Patrick Modiano: La place de l’étoile

Modiano, Patrick (1968, édition revue et corrigée 1995), La place de l’étoile, Gallimard.
ISBN 978-2-07-036698-9

DSC_1552After Patrick Modiano won the Nobel Prize in Literature this year, French friends of mine expressed their satisfaction on Facebook. Finally! A readable and popular writer winning a prize infamous for rewarding the difficult and thorny. In my opinion, they couldn’t have meant the recent history of the prize (cf. my rant here), but then, writers from other literatures are often regarded as difficult by that fact alone, regardless of how well their books read. And over the past 4 or 5 decades, few literary writers have been as consistently and convincingly French as Modiano, whose vast and somewhat repetitive oeuvre offers small treasures of memory, walking down French memory lane. Small episodes, misremembered, identities hidden and revealed, the past inescapable but sometimes difficult to retrieve. Drawing on such sources as Maurice Halbwachs and Henri Bergson and incessantly commenting upon French literature and culture, he has become more than a mainstay of French literature. There is practically no newspaper that has not run an interview with him, including such venerable literary magazines as Paris-Match. Documentaries follow him through small French streets as he rediscovers places of French memory. He is that rare creature: the literary writer who sells well, gets great reviews and all this without the sophomoric need to shock his audience like Amis fils or Philip Roth do. A comfortable, popular writer, comforting the French audience. Can you feel me slowly dying of boredom?

DSC_0242However, none of these descriptions, apart from those dealing with memory, apply to Modiano’s debut trilogy, and especially to his explosive debut La place de l’étoile, an unbelievable fever dream of history and literature, of memory and invention, of being Jewish and being French, “JUIF français,” as its narrator exclaims near the end of this novel. I have never read a novel like this one, a novel dealing with the aftermath of the Shoah, and with the resulting challenges to identities. The two books that come close in some small way are Modiano’s own follow-up efforts La Ronde de Nuit and Les Boulevards de Ceinture, both of which are less heated and angry, less over the top playful and insistent, but they can be seen as continuations on themes brought forth by La place de l’étoile. Modiano’s debut is not just a postmodern novel that combines parody and pastiche and piles reference on reference, it’s also clearly powered by the pain and the difficulties of Jewish identity after the second world war. Playful novels taking on the Shoah abound, but books both deeply steeped in a knowledge of literature and history, and fueled by a need to belong and to find an identity in a country that participated and supported the murder of Jews. I was not happy with an overall bland writer like Modiano being deemed nobélisable, but his debut novel is truly singular and masterful. It’s so harsh and poisonous that it was not translated into German until 2010. A great book. Read it.

DSC_0225The plot of Modiano’s novel is difficult to summarize, not just because so much action is crammed into ~200 pages, but because much of it is contradictory and strange. As Charles O’Keefe pointed out in his slightly odd study of Modiano, there are “problems of understanding at the mimetic level” – Modiano’s main concern is intellectual, not narratological. There are whole sections whose main purpose is to provide a pastiche of this or that writer, or to summarize this or that cultural phenomenon, sections that pretend to provide a part of the story. The narrator is Raphael Schlemilovich who may or may not have lived during the Occupation of France, who may or may not have worked with famous collaborators and antisemites, and who may or may not have been the lover of Eva Braun. The postwar history of Schlemilovich is more firm. In it, Modiano’s protagonist makes a big inheritance, travels France and Europe with his father, a Jewish-American businessman, opens at least one brothel and traffics white, pure-bred French women to become prostitutes in others. He becomes a student and a teacher, a writer and a collector of books. There’s a lot of life to be lived and in a dramatic turns of events, eventually, he ends up in Israel. Explaining any of the plot or telling you how one thing leads to the other would be to spoil your fun. Trust me, it’s a wild ride – and one not entirely interested in consistency. As Ora Avni has said, “literature, like dreams, is not subject to the same logical imperative to choose from among several contradictory alternatives.” Modiano offers us multiple realities at the same time. Places become mutable, servants to narrative and memory. This is not to say that Modiano’s novel gives us empty intellectual blather that is as unreadable as it is hard to summarize. I may be partial to that kind of book, but La place de l’étoile is not it. The story is gripping, the prose intentionally dips into melodrama and eroticism, as well as into slapstick and more elaborate humor. Reading Modiano’s later work is a sophisticated enjoyment, the dry fun of measured intellect. His debut is more riotous fun, but like the bar in From Dusk till Dawn, it’s fun constructed on an abyss of darkness.

chamissoThere are many literary and historical references, too many to recount. The three main intertexts, however, are Adelbert von Chamisso’s Peter Schlemihls wundersame Geschichte (there’s a translation into English by Leopold von Loewenstein-Wertheim, published by Oneworld Classics, maybe you should seek it out?), Marcel Proust’s À la recherche du temps perdu and Louis-Ferdinand Céline’s work, particularly the infamous Bagatelle and the more widely accepted and praised Voyage au bout de la nuit. Chamisso’s influence is underappreciated in commentary on the book. While it’s true that Modiano’s spelling puts his protagonist closer to the yiddish word “schlemil”, meaning idiot or fool, Chamisso’s book provides and interesting angle. Chamisso, while publishing his novella in German and exerting a certain influence on German literature (he was friends with E.T.A. Hoffmann, of “Sandman” fame; and the main German award for foreign-born writers is named after Chamisso), was French by birth and kept returning to France. A nobleman, he fled revolutionary France for the more accommodating arms of Prussia, where he worked in literature and botany. His only novella recounts the story of a man who sells his shadow to the devil, manages to keep his soul, however, in a mixed bag of bargains with Satan. It was written to provide a metaphor for Chamisso’s pain of losing his home and living in exile. His character, the eponymous Peter Schlemihl, roams the earth, infinitely rich (the bargain won him a bag of infinite gold), but rejected everywhere he went. For a book that trades as heavily in antisemitic stereotypes as La place de l’étoile, this wandering character offers an appealing mixture of pure-bred French nobility and a character who is close to the antisemitic stereotype of the rich wandering Jew. Not to mention the fact that for parts of his novel, Modiano’s Schlemi(h)lovich constructs himself as being in a sort of permanent exile from France, and being, quite literally, a rich, wandering Jew. Modiano’s novel appropriates and discusses the rich history of French antisemitism, from the middle ages to the French complicity in the Shoah. A character that both fits the stereotype and was conceived of, written and identified with by a French nobleman is such a great fit for this book as to appear an invention of Modiano. Except for the fact that, delirious narrative aside, there’s little that’s actually invented out of whole cloth by Modiano. His method is one that fuses reality and literary history, that uses literature in the same way a historian would employ his sources. And those sources don’t end with Chamisso.

DSC_0221Another source, perhaps the major source, is Proust. This one keeps turning up in the book, as a major Jewish intertext of whose influence the narrator has to be purged. Some parts of the influence are pastiche or parody. Proust’s novel begins with “Longtemps,…” and Modiano begins with “C’était le temps….”. He revises the George Sand scene from Combray by explaining that “Maman me délaisse pour des joureurs de polo. Elle vient m’embrasser le soir dans mon lit, mais quelquefois elle ne s’en donne pas la peine” and in one of the most erotically charged parts of the book, his admiration of a French nobelwoman is a whole glorious pastiche of Proust’s descriptions of the Guermantes in his book, until he breaks off the scene by having the heiress accost him with bare breasts and a hunger for a Jewish lover. This juxtaposition of elegance and description with racist, antisemitic or misogynist crudeness serves to keep the novel organized. Its chaos is anything but. Modiano doesn’t sneak pastiches into the book. He announces them by a change in style and mood, and announces similarly when they have passed. I’m sure there are parodies or pastiches that I’ve missed, but most are rather forward and open, like the parody of Celine’s style in the opening pages. These breaks additionally keep us on our toes. The use of Proust is more than decoration, it’s an active agent. The constant use of Proust is nagging us to read Modiano’s novel in terms of memory, of self creation and décreation, to borrow a term from Simone Weil. Modiano dissolves all involuntary memory in a present that basically co-exists with the past, an effect that transposes an interior mechanism of Proust’s into exterior action and narrative. With Bergson, Proust saw memory as fusing with the present in a creative, if involuntary act. Modiano goes ahead and just fuses everything in a more or less co-temporary plane. For the question of WHY Modiano would do such a thing we could offer different answers.

DSC_0220Some would touch on the basic concept of memory being important in literature after the Shoah. The Shoah, with its wholesale destruction of culture and living witnesses is a hazard to the production of memory as outlined by Halbwachs and others. This is why writers like Shoshana Felman and Dori Laub spoke of a “crisis of witnessing”. Personal, individual memory is not enough. It needs to be infused into culture, into cultural memory. In one of the more ‘outrageous’ moments of the book, a friend of Schlemilovich’s explains that, “[n]on content de débaucher les femmes de ce pays, j’ai voulu aussi prostitué toute la littérature française [et la] [t]ransformer.” This transformation, on the face of it, is an act of vandalism, of “vengeance”, as his friend says. But on a broader level, it also describes what needs to be done for the memory of the Shoah to survive and for the horrors of it to be contextualized. It didn’t come out of nowhere and tirelessly, Modiano drags out ancient and modern instances of French antisemitism. Another use of Proust could be suggested if we read Beckett’s famous and masterful study of Proust. In a summary of a particular episode, Beckett tells us

But this resumption of a past life is poisoned by a cruel anachronism: [Marcel’s] grandmother is dead. For the first time since her death […] he has recovered her living and complete, […]. For the first time since her death he knows that she is dead, he knows who is dead. […] This contradiction between presence and irremediable obliteration is intolerable.

Modiano’s book, with its turns and quirks, its changes and challenges, can be seen as a recovery of a presence, that of Jewish life in France, of French Jews, “un JUIF français,” as Schlemilovich throws out defiantly towards the end of the book. This reading is supported by the fact that the further we burrow into the book’s madness and the closer we get to its end, the more loudly Modiano speaks of the Shoah. In a scene towards the end, a drunkard on Vienna’s streets yells loudly “6 Millionen Juden! 6 Millionen Juden!”

DSC_1554There is also a movement towards a more precise sense of place. In its early goings, Modiano’s book mixes real and fictional places. A womanizer early on tells him stories of women he’s been with, and that list contains famous prostitutes, as well as “Odette de Crecy”, the courtesan from Proust’s novel. Modiano makes Bardamu, the WWI veteran and doctor of Celine’s novel Voyage au bout de la nuit, into a real person, who Schlemilovich interacts with, just as he interacts with Freud, Himmler, Eva Braun and a veritable who-is-who of the French collaborator scene, including complicated figures like the Jewish collaborator (and Catholic convert) Maurice Sachs. At the end of the book, however, we get a genuine sense of place, as the Gestapo sites in Paris are named one by one:

31 bis et 72 avenue Foch. 57 boulevard Lannes. 48 rue de Villejust. 101 avenue Henri-Martin. 3 et 5 rue Mallet-Stevens. 21 et 23 square de Bois-de-Boulogne. 25 rue d’Astorg. 6 rue Adolphe-Yvon. 64 boulevard Suchet. 49 rue de la Faisanderie. 180 rue de la Pompe.

This is a sudden return to reality, to what Pierre Nora called “Lieux de Mémoire”, places of memory. If you want to get a brief but succinct summary of Nora’s role in creating a postwar political and historical memory in France, I recommend Hue-Tam Ho Tai’s essay “Remembered Realms: Pierre Nora and French National Memory” – overall, suffice it to say that France has been particularly enganged in gauging the workings of cultural and public memory and that places, be they monuments or remembered, enshrined or described places, play a central role in this. But to get back to Chamisso and Proust: Modiano’s project is private as well as public (and I don’t mean odd ideas like O’Keefe’s theory of fratricide). It’s about the identity of being a French Jew. A Jew in a France that, as reactionary intellectuals like Maurras have said, can only be understood by those whose roots are deep in French history, excluding the “wandering Jews” – Jewishness can be an involuntary identity, as many German and French Jews learned during the Third Reich, when it was declared that everybody’s a Jew who has Jewish ancestry – not only those who openly identified as Jews. There’s a sense in which Jewishness is circumscribed by writers about Jewishness, that’s it’s defined by others – and Modiano’s Schlemilovich takes on the role of those who do the defining for parts of the novel. This leery attitude towards history writing is also one of the ways in which Modiano sets himself apart from later, lesser works. The bloody, overly sexualized reality of Jonathan Littell’s barnburner is anchored to an idea of reality that equals or exceeds historiography (see my review of HHhH). No such pretense makes it into Modiano’s pages.

DSC_0219The book’s furor and inventiveness – as well as the age of its 23 year old author – preclude it from tying up its issues in a neat knot. Echoing many readers, its last lines are a declaration by Schlemilovich: “Je suis bien fatigué”. The followup novel, published only one year later, La Ronde de Nuit, doesn’t neatly continue the book’s trajectory, but does elaborate on its themes in a language not far removed from the debut. It’s about a double agent in Vichy France, but it does not name and use places as heavily as the latter third of La place de l’étoile. Les Boulevards de Ceintures, the third novel, is more explicit in naming places and dealing with the occupation. Like the debut, it delves deeply into issues of Jewish identity, of guilt and collaboration. At its center is a father/son relationship, which doubles as an analogue to the French/Jewish identity conflict. How, as a writer in a France that persecuted its Jews, do you construct a Jewish identity that is also a French one? The conflict is overwhelming, and the dark and involved language of Modiano’s first three books, especially of his debut, is testament to those difficulties. Boulevards de Ceintures ends with the exhortation by a barman lecturing the young Jewish son, researching his past (and by implication, France’s Vichy past) that, in the protagonist’s words, “je ferais mieux de penser à l’avenir”. If we look at the rest of Modiano’s work, it’s as if Modiano’s passion and the pain powering those books burned itself out. There are book that work as reprises of smaller themes, such as the research at the heart of Dora Bruder that recalls the search in Boulevards de Ceintures, but the pervasive search for memory and identity is more anodyne in the later books, more personal, less political. Mind you, it still puts Modiano heads and shoulders above writers like Paul Auster, who was inspired by books like the 1978 novel Rue des Boutiques Obscures to create his New York Trilogy, but doesn’t invest it with any of the historical urgency that Modiano still drags through his books, even if it’s in a reduced, backgrounded way. It’s a disappointment if you come to later Modiano after being introduced to him through his amazing debut, but at the same time, knowing how Modiano framed and discussed the cultural and personal stakes of postwar identity helps read his books in a deeper context.

lacombe_lucienPart of my reading of Modiano’s work as one of diminishing returns includes the fact that all his best work happened within his first ten years as a writer, with La Place de l’Étoile and Rue des Boutiques obscures as standout milestones at each end of it. I have already explained that I consider his debut to be his best work, but there is another text that comes close, and it, too, was written in that early period. This work is the script for Lacombe Lucien (1974), which he co-wrote with Louis Malle. Now, while I am hesitant to proclaim the greatness of Modiano, I would suggest it’s fairly agreed upon that Louis Malle is among last century’s greatest directors. Lacombe Lucien is a transcendent movie, excellent from start to finish. From casting to script and cinematography, there are few faults to find with this movie. The story is centered around the eponymous Lucien, a strange boy living in a French village during WWII, who wants to join the Résistance to indulge his taste for violence, but is rebuffed. Instead, he ends up joining the “German police” or rather a French militia that resides in a villa and hunts down members of the Résistance. Immediately, he informs on his old school teacher, of whom he knows the role in the Résistance. Many of Modiano’s topics recur in the movie: the guilt during wartime France, the historical burden of French antisemitism, the lies and secrets. And as in much of his work, the focal character is a boy. And while in most of Modiano’s work after the debut, stories of wartime France are cushioned in a framework of memory and remembrance, sometimes aiming, but obviously missing, for the poise, elegance and urgency of Proust, Lacombe Lucien‘s effect is immediate and stark. Much of the movie’s tension comes from its viewers (and secondary characters) never really knowing where this story would take them. Lucien is an unpredictable character, cold, cruel, yet at the same time possessed of a queer innocence. The movie reclaims much of the strangeness and oddity of Modiano’s debut. The characters in the villa are not meant to be realistic – there’s a famous bicycle champion, an actress, a small, angry antisemite, a horny, mildly disloyal servant with a lazy eye, a smooth black gunman, dressed like a Chicago mobster and the head of the operation, who employs his mother as a secretary. They might look like a joke, but they proceed with violence and efficiency, terrorizing the whole countryside.

220px-LacombeLucienThe slightly surreal quality that much of the movie has, the sometimes dreamlike sense of unreality is something that Modiano already perfected in his debut, together with the sexual politics of wartime antisemitism. There’s a blonde Jewish woman, who Lucien falls for immediately; she tells Lucien, in an intoxicated moment that she’s tired of being jewish. There are German Nazis in the movie but the only actual German we hear, apart from one phone call, is from the dialogue of a Jewish tailor who hides in the area. I feel like I’m doing a terrible job explaining the excellence of how the scenes and characters are constructed. The movie has an odd way of dealing with realism. It’s not just the strangeness of scenes and characters, sometimes Malle will keep the camera on a scene for long enough, that a sense of alienation creeps into the scene despite nothing odd having been added. One great example of this is an early scene, where a horse dies, and the villagers drag it onto a cart. This, already, takes quite some time, but then, Lucien is left behind with the horse, and he looks at it quizzically, caressing its face. It’s a frightening scene, it’s an encounter with animal physicality and death that shows us a clearer and deeper look into the desolation of Lucien’s soul than any other scene. To be clear, the movie is strange, surreal, but also highly realistic. Like Modiano’s other work, it becomes part of a process of collective memory, a contribution to critical debates about history, about the French role in WWII and so on. Yet, much as I might like to talk about this movie in terms of Modiano’s work, I don’t actually know how involved Malle was in the script. After all, Modiano, who was born in 1945, never lived through this period that was so important for his work. Modiano’s commitment is to cultural memory and its workings, not personal memory. Louis Malle, in contrast, was born in 1932, and has memories of being a boy in wartime France. I’m obviously more focused on Modiano here, but as a whole, it feels as if it’s more of a piece with Modiano’s work than Malle’s and yet given his novels, Modiano was no longer able to produce this kind of work. Maybe he needed Malle to return to the heights of his debut. Lacombe Lucien is truly extraordinary.

DSC_0228I keep saying this about books I admire, but my reading has barely touched on the complexities of La place de l’étoile. It’s a truly great book, and it rewards reading, rereading and analysis. I might even be wrong about it, and I suspect had my reading of Deleuze’s Proust book and Halbwachs’ work on memory been more recent (or if I had more time to reread them, as well as Proust and Céline) I could have made a better case in my arguments on memory. There is a whole line in French collaboration history that’s connected to homosexuality that, in the novel, can be read to tie into its discussions of Jewish sexuality (Otto Weininger might be apropos), as well as Proust and Céline, but I don’t have the room here for that nor do I have time to go back into research on this. I encourage everyone who made it to this part of the review to not only read the novel but to also use it to research at least all the names and places of it, reread their Proust and Céline, maybe some famous antisemites like Weininger. I know that it made me personally want to reread Gilles by Pierre Drieu La Rochelle, which, given the appropriate amount of leisure, I will do. If you want to support me in buying/reading books, there are ways to do so, too 😉

*

As always, if you feel like supporting this blog, there is a “Donate” button on the left and this link RIGHT HERE. 🙂 If you liked this, tell me. If you hated it, even better. Send me comments, requests or suggestions either below or via email (cf. my About page) or to my twitter.)

Advertisements

Just dumb

Well. Yesterday I was poking fun at Nigel Beale’s absurd idea of how to read literature and art. This is from the first post of his on this topic.

Based on what we have here, what I know of Proust’s life , and my experience reading Holmes and Coleridge, Marchand and Byron, Ellmann and Joyce, Steegmuller and Flaubert, for example, I’m with Sainte-Beuve. Knowing about Coleridge’s life struggles, his politics, his relationship with women (and I’m relying on the accuracy of Holmes’ research), knowing Coleridge this way, enriched my experience of his work, influenced the way I understood it, and increased my appreciation and enjoyment of it. The text remains the same. Its intrinsic aesthetic qualities remain the same, what changes is my reception of them. Because of the biographical information additional layers of interpretation open themselves up to me. Because of the new tenderness I feel for the man, my reading is more sympathetic. Biography obviously doesn’t replace close reading, it augments it.

Well. If you look at yesterday’s post, you’ll notice that actually, in his case, as in most cases, it may open layers of interpretation, but it closes many many more. In my reading experience as a reader of literature and as a reader of literary criticism, inclusion of biographical facts almost always leads to a narrow interpretation.

I hold that the critic is free to consider biographical material for inspiration. But it can never, ever, turn up later as a way of argument. Beale doesn’t understand this crucial division, as is visible in his own abysmally poor remarks, for instance on Picasso. Moreover, such a biographical reading should never be mixed up with a marxist reading, such as Lucien Goldmann’s take on Racine and Pascal in Le Dieu Caché (which is fraught with errors of its own, but that’s a different story). I think I sorted the two out somewhat in this essay.

Biography, in short, doesn’t augment close reading, instead it hampers it. Thousands of essays done this way are ample proof of this, pick up any one of it, I have never read one that wasn’t frustrating, after all was said and done. If you want an example: Gwiazda’s book on Merrill and Auden is exasperatingly bad, not because the author’s such an idiot, but because you can see how the author’s bothered by the weights imposed on him by the biographical details, so much indeed, that the whole book reads like a bizarre experiment in bad literary criticism.

It’s a whole other kettle of fish, of course, when you are reading for fun. I have, personally, read dozens of biographies, I am currently aswim in the wonderful letters of Schwartz and his publisher Laughlin. When literary criticism is not concerned, it’s different. Then, often, it’s also less about the texts as texts, instead, the texts are part of the biography, even as the biography can never be part of the texts.

Nigel Beale, it appears, is a twat.

Wovon man nicht sprechen kann (Überarbeitet)

Jorge Sempruns Debütroman Le Grand Voyage, schon früh als wichtiger Teil der noch jungen Lagerliteratur erkannt, ist ein Buch, das “modern in der Form, aber bei aller Kompliziertheit doch einfach und verständlich” (Möckel 1059) ist. Seither hat Semprun verschiedene autobiographisch gefärbte Bücher geschrieben. Obwohl sich Le Grand Voyage mit der Shoah beschäftigt, “befaßt sich [Semprun] allerdings nicht speziell mit der Judenfrage” (Möckel 1055), es ist ein Roman, der aus der Perspektive eines Rotspaniers, wie man zur Zeit des Dritten Reichs spanische Mitglieder der Résistance nannte, verfasst ist. Die “Große Reise” des Titels meint eine Zugreise im Viehwagon aus Frankreich ins Konzentrationslager Buchenwald.
Der zentrale erzählerische Trick des Romans ist, daß der Erzähler von dieser Reise 16 Jahre nach der Befreiung von Buchenwald erzählt und in seiner Erzählung Erinnerungen, die zu verschiedenen Zeiten abgerufen werden, intertextuelle Bezüge und politische Anmerkungen vermischt. Es ist aber nicht nur dieses Netz aus Erinnerungen und Literatur, das seinem Shoah-Zeugnis besondere Kraft verleiht, sondern auch die Lücken in dem Netz, zwischen dem Wissen und Erzählen die Unwissenheit und das Schweigen, neben der Erinnerung das Vergessen.
An diesem Punkt setzt die vorliegende Arbeit an. Es wird sich zeigen, daß nicht die Erinnerung der wichtigste Aspekt des Romans ist, soweit es die Shoahverarbeitung betrifft, sondern daß vielmehr das Vergessen und Schweigen die Grenzen und Möglichkeiten von Erinnerung aufzeigt. Dafür wird die Reise als dreistufige Auseinandersetzung mit Erzählen, Erinnern und Schweigen begriffen. Nachdem wir die Erzählkonstellation des Buches und ihrer Verbindung zum Erzählen nach und von Auschwitz, ihre Verbindung zum traumatischen Erzählen, dargestellt haben, wenden wir uns der Erinnerung und der literarischen Auseinandersetzung mit autobiographischer Erinnerung zu. Schließlich werden wir zu der besonderen Form der Erinnerung, die das Zeugnisablegen darstellt, kommen. Zum Schluß werden wir dem Schweigen begegnen, als Nicht-Erzählen ebenso wie als Nicht-Erinnern, und diese zwei Seiten des Schweigens, die in diesem Roman vorgestellt werden, besprechen. Es wird sich zeigen, daß das Schweigen sowohl absolut notwendig ist, als auch überwunden werden muß, soll die Shoah Teil unseres kulturellen Gedächtnisses werden und nicht vielmehr eine obskure Fußnote der Geschichte.

In der Rezeption von Le Grand Voyage wird regelmäßig auf die autobiographische Natur des Romans verwiesen, obwohl es bei genauer Betrachtung von den sogenannten autobiographischen Büchern Sempruns gerade dasjenige ist, das formal betrachtet, zumindest wenn man sich auf Lejeune bezieht, im Grunde der einzige in der Sekundärliteratur herangezogene Theoretiker, gerade nicht autobiographisch ist, “according to the minimal criteria proposed by Philippe Lejeune: the author’s name is identical to the names of the narrator and of the protagonist.” (Suleiman 137). Weder ‘Jorge’ noch ‘Semprun’ kommen im Roman vor, also kommt ein “autobiographischer Pakt” nicht zustande.
Dennoch, da “he used several pseudonyms during his years in the Resistance and in
the Communist Party, Semprun’s names have been multiple” (Suleiman 137). Der “Ich-Erzähler, der innerhalb der Handlung von den französischen Romanfiguren Gérard und von den spanischen Manuel genannt wird” (Küster 43) trägt zwei dieser Namen und außerdem, wie z.B. Küster gezeigt hat, stimmen die Biographien des Ich-Erzählers und die Sempruns “völlig überein” (43). Es wird wohl diese Übereinstimmung sein, die in der Kritik die Auseinandersetzung mit der autobiographischen Hypothese vermissen läßt, es scheint offensichtlich zu sein, daß Le Grand Voyage einen autobiographischen Text darstellt.
Die so verfahrenden Autoren verweisen jedoch recht selten auf die Tatsache, die gerade in ihrem Text- und Autorenverständnis schwer wiegen sollte, daß Semprun in späteren Werken verschiedene Details in früheren Texten in Bezug auf ihren Wahrheitsgehalt korrigiert. Semprun scheint ein unsicherer Kantonist zu sein, was die autobiographische Wahrheit seiner Texte angeht. Dies aber bedeutet, daß die Entscheidung, Romane wie Le Grand Voyage aufgrund von Übereinstimmungen einfach als autobiographisch zu markieren, von einer unsauberen kritischen Methode zeugt .

Schon Paul De Man verweist in seinem Essay “Autobiography as De-facement” (cf. De Man, Rhetoric of Romanticism, 67ff.) auf die methodischen Schwierigkeiten, die bei einer Bestimmung der Autobiographie als Genre, das sich z. B. von der Fiktion oder der Reportage klar unterscheidet, auftreten. Was ich zuvor als ‘autobiographische Hypothese’ bezeichnet habe, begründet de Man mit der “illusion of reference” (69). Gerade aber in Arbeiten, die sich mit der Shoah beschäftigen, sollte die Beziehung zwischen Fiktionen und anderen Illusionen ausreichend geklärt sein, um nicht in die Situation gedrängt zu werden, die Wahrheit der Shoah verteidigen zu müssen, gegen Angriffe, die insinuieren, daß, wer in einem Detail lügt, dies vielleicht auch in anderen, wesentlicheren Details macht.
Im Folgenden wird daher der Roman als ein fiktiver Text behandelt, in dem zwar Zeugnis abgelegt wird, aber nicht Zeugnis vom Schicksal des Schriftstellers Jorge Semprun, sondern vom Schicksal des Rotspaniers Gérard. Alle im weiteren Text auftauchenden Aussagen über Erinnerung, Zeugnis oder Erzählung beziehen sich auf den Erzähler Gérard, nicht auf Semprun.

Das gros des Romans ist in der ersten Person Singular geschrieben, es beschreibt die Zugreise Manuels, eines spanischen Résistancekämpfers der seit seinem Eintritt in eben jene Résistance unter dem Kampfnamen Gérard bekannt ist. Die Geschichte wird sechzehn Jahre nach der Befreiung von Buchenwald von Gérard erzählt, wobei dies nicht die einzige Ebene bleibt, auf der jemandem etwas erzählt wird. Die zentrale Erzählkonstellation des Romans ist in dem Gespräch zu finden, das Gérard mit einem namenlosen Mithäftling im Zug führt, der dem Leser lediglich als ‘gars de Semur’ bekannt ist. Kaplan schlägt vor, den ‘gars de Semur’ als Erfindung zu betrachten, die Gérard in seine Erzählung einführt, “because the memory of taking the gruelling journey alone would have been difficult to reconstruct without an interlocutor” (Kaplan 322). Das Gespräch ist also nicht nur ein erinnertes Gespräch, es erfüllt außerdem noch eine Funktion innerhalb der Erzählstruktur des Romans. Zu dieser Doppelbelegung von wichtigen Ereignissen werden wir jedoch später kommen.
Diese Figur des Zuhörers hat jedoch einen weiteren Vorteil für die Erzählung von Gérard 16 Jahre nach der Befreiung. In Anlehnung an modernistische Prosavorbilder wie Proust und Faulkner, stellt Gérards Erzählung eine Flickenteppich aus Erinnerung und literarischen Anspielungen dar, in dem verschiedene Zeitebenen überlappen. Es ist vorgeschlagen worden, daß ein Erzählen von episodischem Erinnern dann besonders kohärent erscheint, wenn “very personal emotive attitudes, evaluative beliefs and emotional associations of a remembered episode” (Bublitz 378) ins Spiel kommen. Aber dies ist mit einem so außergewöhnlichen Ereignis wie der Shoah nicht leicht zu erreichen. Die Einführung eines ‘echten’ Zuhörers zusätzlich zum impliziten Zuhörer, der sich aus der informellen, mündliche Rede nachahmenden Sprache des Romans ergibt, kann als ein Versuch gelesen werden, eine Ebene der geteilten Erfahrung zu erreichen, indem Gérard dem ‘gars de Semur’ nach und nach alles was ihn in die Situation brachte, in der er nun ist, kleinteilig erklärt.
Damit erklärt er dem ‘gars de Semur’ aber auch das, was gerade passiert, die Zugfahrt ebenso wie die Greuel während und die antizipierten Greuel nach der Fahrt. Im Zusammenhang mit der Traumaforschung ist ein solches Sprechen über schlimme Erfahrungen als positiver Mechanismus bekannt, der dafür Sorgen kann, daß die ‘live’ beschriebene Erfahrung nicht zu einer traumatischen Erinnerung wird (cf. Shabad 201). Diese Konstellation allerdings sorgt auch dafür, daß Buchenwald weitgehend ausgespart bleibt, eine Lücke bildet, denn das Lager, wie sich im Laufe des Romans herausstellt, kann er niemandem mehr erzählen, d.h. verständlich machen. Es ist dann auch das Lager, das den Grundstock seiner traumatischen Erfahrung bildet. Der Erzähler klagt: “Il n’y a plus personne à qui je puisse parler de ce voyage. La solitude de ce voyage va me ronger […] toute ma vie.” (GV 165)

All dies wird mit den erzählerischen Mitteln vollbracht, die Marcel Proust zu einem Bestandteil der Weltliteratur machte . Im folgenden Unterkapitel werden ein paar der literarischen Techniken dargestellt, die zu diesen Mitteln gehören, wie von Gérard Genette in Figures III dargestellt.
So kann das Gespräch mit dem ‘gars de Semur’ und die Reise als Analepsis gesehen werden, jedoch liegt es in der Natur der Darstellung dieses Romans, daß der Leser häufig vergisst, daß es sich bei der jetzt-Ebene keineswegs um die Reise-Ebene handelt, so daß Bezüge ins Jetzt und in die Jahre nach der Befreiung dem Leser als Prolepsis, also als Vorgriff erscheinen. Beide Begriffe kann man unter dem Begriff der Anachronie zusammenfassen (cf. Genette 76-120).

Man muß nicht so weit gehen wie Edwards und Potter und sagen, daß

“reality is not a stable phenomenon that can be used to validate memories but is instead established by memories” (Lebow 12).

Jedoch ist im Roman von Semprun die Wirklichkeit, auf die Gérards
Erzählung rekurriert, nicht zu trennen von literarischen Reminiszenzen und Konstrukten, zu denen, wie oben angeführt, unter Umständen auch der ‘gars de Semur’ gehört. Die Unterscheidung von Wirklichkeit und Erinnerung soll jedoch hier noch nicht geleistet werden, das wird anderorts geschehen. Vielmehr möchte ich an dieser Stelle Erzählung, also literarische Mittel, Konstrukte und ähnliches, abgrenzen von genuiner Erinnerung, verstanden als zunächst einmal unabhängig vom ‘tatsächlichen’ Wahrheitsgehalt in Bezug auf die Welt. Diese Unterscheidung ist schon dann sinnvoll und notwendig, wenn man sich ins Gedächtnis ruft, daß erinnernde Erzählungen, ihren Gegenstand, die autobiographische Erinnerung “modellieren” (Tschuggnall 58). Gerade im Fall von Gérards Erzählung ist angesichts der vielen metonymischen und symbolischen Elemente die Vermutung sinnvoll, daß der Erzähler die Reise wieder aufnimmt, nachdem er sie vergessen hat, “in order to create myth” (Haft 181).
Der ‘gars de Semur’ ist zum Beispiel unter Umständen eine erinnerte Figur, in jedem Fall aber hat er eine bestimmte literarische Funktion, nämlich den des Zuhörers in der Geschichte, der dafür zuständig ist, daß das Erlebte nicht aus der Erinnerung verschwindet oder zum Trauma wird. So ist auch die Reise, abgesehen von ihrer erinnerten Tatsache, auch eine Figur, es “is made to encapsule every element of the concentration camp universe” und “it contains within itself the camp experience” (Haft 40). Es ist also eine Figur die das darstellen soll, was der Erzähler, Gérard, zu erzählen nicht imstande ist. Im Grunde, könnte man sagen, gewinnt so das Nicht-Erzählte Konturen durch das Erzählen des sich davor und des sich danach Ereignenden. Eine andere Art dem Nicht-Erzählten eine Form zu geben stellt die Figur des Hans von Freiberg zu Freiberg dar, aber dazu später.
Ähnlich funktionieren die literarischen Anspielungen die diesen Text überfluten. Die zwei wichtigsten dieser literarischen Bezugspunkte bilden marxistische Texte und das Werk Marcel Prousts. Besonders auf das letztere wird oft zurückgegriffen. Ob es sich nun um Abwandlungen berühmter Formulierungen handelt, so wird etwa ” Longtemps je me suis couché de bonne heure” umgeschrieben zu ” Je me suis longtemps couché de bonne heure” (cf. Kaplan 325), oder um eine Parallele zwischen einer literarischen Reminiszenz und einem erinnerten Ereignis, das zu einer zentrale Episode des Romans ausgebaut wird, der Begegnung mit einer Jüdin nämlich, die Gérard nach dem Weg fragt (cf. Haft 43), oder schließlich um die sprachlichen Strukturen und Figuren wie der mémoire spontanée, die bei Semprun wie bei Proust die erzählerische Darstellung von Erinnerung bestimmt, Proust ist allgegenwärtig. Ein anderer wichtiger literarischer Bezugspunkt ist der Reisetopos, weist der Roman doch zumindest Beziehungen zu zwei anderen Reisetexten der Weltliteratur auf, zum einen zu Baudelaires Gedicht “Le Voyage” und zum anderen zu Dantes Divina Commedia (cf. Ferrán 283).
Wortspiele und Anspielungen, die weder literarische Referenz noch eigenständige Figuren sind, bilden das dritte wichtige Element im Erzählkonstrukt, das in Le Grand Voyage über das Erinnerungskonstrukt gelegt ist und sich so mit ihm verbunden hat, daß an vielen Stellen unentscheidbar ist, was Erinnerung und was erzählerische Struktur ist. In diese Gruppe gehören Ortsnamen wie das Tabou, das als Wortspiel für sich stehen kann, oder Semur, das in dem Gebiet liegt, in dem wichtige erinnerte Ereignisse situiert werden, und das sich ausgerechnet als Teil der Bezeichnung des namenlosen Gesprächspartners im Deportationszug wiederfindet. Erwähnung findet auch die Tatsache, daß Buchenwald bei Weimar gelegen ist, der Stadt, wo einige der großen Klassiker der deutschen Literatur weite Teile ihres Lebens verbracht haben, darunter Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. Die Tatsache, daß dessen Werk missbraucht wurde für völkisches Denken war sowohl zur Zeit der Fahrt, man denke nur einmal an Walter Flex, als auch zum Zeitpunkt, da Gérard die Geschichte erzählt, wohlbekannt . Und schließlich, auf dem Weg ins Lager, passiert der Zug Trier, die Geburtsstadt von Karl Marx, der seine wichtigsten Werke außerhalb der Grenzen Deutschlands verfasst hat und dessen Gesellschaftsanalyse Gérard dazu dient, sich, dem ‘gars de Semur’ und dem Leser den Faschismus zu erklären. Zusammen bildet diese Erzählschicht die über der Erinnerung liegt, nicht nur die Möglichkeit, eine Geschichte zu erzählen, sondern sie hilft auch der Erinnerung aus, denn Erinnerung ist in Le Grand Voyage kein einfacher Prozeß und das Erzählen von Erinnerung schon gar nicht.

In Le Grand Voyage ist es mit der Erinnerung keine einfache Sache. Das Projekt des Erzählers ist es zweifellos, sich zu erinnern, “refaire ce voyage” (GV 29) und jemandem davon zu erzählen. Jedoch bekommt dieser Impuls zum Erzählen, zum Erinnern, immer wieder negative Entsprechungen, so wie das stete Vergessen und das fast körperliche Unwohlsein, das im Erzähler spontan auftauchende Erinnerungen auslösen: “J’étais immobile, […] une fois encore blessé à mort par les souvenirs de ce voyage” (GV 152). Die erwünschte, vom Impuls gedeckte Sorte Erinnerung ist offenbar die memoire volontaire. Diese Sorte Erinnerung errfolgt im Allgemeinen langsam und nach und nach, und zwar in einer der Gelegenheit angemessenen Ordnung (cf. Helstrup et al. 295). Es ist vergleichsweise leicht, diese Art Erinnerung in eine Erzählung umzuformen und “present the situations and episodes such that within the reader a sensibility is created […] and hereby make him share the world of the Narrator.” (Bartsch 120). Wie man auch zum Beispiel an der Episode mit dem deutschen Soldaten sieht, sind solche Erinnerungen auch recht strukturiert und können, wie in der angeführten Episode (cf. GV 47ff.) sogar die Form eines Arguments annehmen. Diese Eigenschaft von willkürlichen Erinnerungen wird im Roman durchaus erkannt und als positiv verbucht: “Il y a une autre méthode, aussi. C’est de profiter de ce voyage pour faire le tri.” (GV 34).
Jedoch, “involuntary memories do not simply capture schematic knowledge” (Helstrup et al. 295). Unwillkürliche Erinnerungen erscheinen spontan, ohne den Willen, sie hervorzurufen (cf. Helstrup 293f.), so sagt Gérard über eine davon, daß “elle a explosé tout à coup” (GV 253). Sie sind der wichtigste Bestandteil von Gérards erzählten Erinnerungen. Es kann sogar sein, daß die als kontrolliert dargestellten Erinnerungen eigentlich nur erzählerisch aufbereitete unwillkürliche Erinnerungen sind, die deshalb bearbeitet sind, “um […] die Vorrangstellung des Geistes gegenüber dem unwillkürlichen Einbruch der Vergangenheit ins gegenwärtige Bewußtsein zu behaupten.” (Küster 53f.). Die direkte, verletzende Wirkung traumatischer Ereignisse wirkt sich auch auf die zerrissene Form des Textes, die sich in den ständigen Tempuswechseln zeigt, aus (cf. Suleiman 136).

Es ist jedoch bereits eine enorme Leistung Gérards, aus der traumatischen Erinnerung, die manche “as an underground river of recollection” (Winter 271) mit sich herumtragen, eine zusammenhängende Erzählung zu konstruieren. Paradoxerweise ist es nicht das Sprechen oder Erzählen das ihn darauf vorbereitet, sondern das Schweigen, vielmehr: das Vergessen. Das Schweigen nach dem Ereignis, das ja hier ein öffentliches Schweigen ist und noch kein echtes Vergessen “était la seule façon de s’en sortir” (GV 125). Schweigen als der einzige Ausweg, das erscheint im Zusammenhang mit der Traumatheorie, in der das Sprechen über das Trauma der beste Weg ist, damit fertig zu werden, paradox. Nun präzisiert Gérard jedoch, daß es sich nicht darum handelt, nicht darüber zu reden, sondern eher, nicht Fragen zu beantworten. Hier klingt die berühmte Antwort nach, die ein Aufseher Primo Levi gibt und die Lanzmann in seinem opus magnum Shoah übernimmt: “Hier ist kein Warum” (Levi, Ist das ein Mensch, 18). Gérard betont auch an anderer Stelle, daß seinen ehemaligen Mithäftlingen nicht geholfen ist mit Erklärungen: “[ils] n’ont pas besoin d’explication” (GV 89).
Also ist dieses Schweigen zunächst ein sich-Verweigern an die ‘üblichen’ Fragen. Andererseits macht es auch den Eindruck eines Selbstschutzmechanismus’, wobei diese beiden Konzepte schwer zu trennen sind. Schließlich beschließt Gérard sogar, bestimmte Episoden zu vergessen. Aber es ist nicht klar, ob Gérard, wenn er sagt “j’avais tout oublié” (GV 193), wirklich meint, er habe alles vergessen. Schließlich scheint er sich der Präsenz der Erinnerungen wohl bewußt zu sein, denn er vertraut darauf, daß die Erinnerungen einfach wieder zur Verfügung stehen werden, wenn er das will, “tout était là” (GV 29), schreibt er an anderer Stelle. Das ‘Vergessen’ kann also kein Vergessen im herkömmlichen Sinn sein, es ist vielmehr festzustellen, daß es sich bei dem Vergessen wohl eher um das eben beschriebene Schweigen handelt, das ein Nichtssprechen über bestimmte Aspekte oder alle Aspekte der Reise und der auf der Reise erfahrenen Greuel ist.
Wenn dies der Fall ist, dann kann man in diesen Passagen einen ersten Hinweis dafür sehen, daß das Schweigen eine Art Vergessen nach sich ziehen kann. Wenn es aber nicht plausiblerweise als persönliches Vergessen gelesen werden kann, schließlich ist der Text durchzogen von unwillkürlicher Erinnerung, dann muß es eine Art öffentliche Erinnerung sein. Die enorm häufige Verwendung von Stilmitteln wie der oben beschriebenen Prolepsis stellt dabei die verschiedenen Grade des Schweigens dar, indem ein Ereignis, das auf der Zugebene stattgefunden hat, zu späteren Zeitpunkten gespiegelt wird, außerdem wird Gérards Umgang mit diesem Ereignis dargestellt . Gleichzeitig wird durch Bemerkungen wie “il va mourir” (GV 165) die Zeitebene der Reise, die so wie sie ist, schon nicht als ‘unschuldig’ gelten kann, mit weiterer schwerer Bedeutung aufgeladen und die Ereignisse in ihrer vollen traumatischen Form gezeigt. Dies ist relevant, wenn man beachtet, daß LaCapra unterscheidet zwischen “the traumatic […] event and the traumatic experience” (LaCapra, History in Transit, 55). Das traumatische Ereignis, also die Reise kann eigentlich ohne weiteres Teil einer Erzählung werden, aber die traumatische Erfahrung läßt sich gerade nicht auf einen bestimmten Zeitpunkt festlegen, also nicht in die Chronologie eines Erzählens einfügen. Gérard jedoch gelingt es durch die Anachronien, dennoch eine recht präzise Darstellung dieser traumatischen Erfahrung zu zeichnen.

Trauma, beziehungsweise das sogenannte Posttraumatische Belastungssyndrom folgt oft einem besonders emotional belastendem Ereignis. Die Erinnerung an ein solches Ereignis ist begleitet von Angst. Weiterhin gilt: “One of the […] features of this disorder […] is that the memory of the traumatic experience remains powerful for decades and is readily reactivated by a variety of stressful circumstances” (Kandel 343). Das heißt, daß das Besondere an einem traumatischen Erlebnis im Grunde eine Verschärfung der Proustschen Erinnerung ist. Das Problem in traumatischen Erinnerungen ist nachgerade nicht die Verdrängung, oder ein wie auch immer gearteter “Gedächtnisschwund”, sondern die Dauerpräsenz von Erinnerungen, die “ungewollt und beharrlich immer wieder” (Caruth 87) zurückkehren. Aus der “überwältigende[n] Unittelbarkeit und Genauigkeit der Erinnerungen” (Caruth 87) ergeben sich dann gewisse Probleme bei der Wiedergabe des Erfahrenen.
Vor allem zwei dieser Probleme sind relevant für diesen Roman. Zum einen der besondere Umgang mit Zeit, denn die sogenannte traumatische Zeit “is circular or fixed rather than linear” (Winter 75). Das bedeutet aber für den Erzähler, daß er mit der gewöhnlichen chronologischen Erzählweise brechen muß, denn das “Fortdauern der Holocaust-Zeit, die als beständig neue Zeit erfahren wird, bedroht die Chronologie der erfahrenen Zeit” (Langer 56, seine Hervorhebung). Gérard löst die Chronologieprobleme, indem er das Zirkuläre, das Wiederkehrende, mit der häufig variierten Figur der Reise zu fassen sucht, es wird die Reise nach Buchenwald zweimal unternommen, und zusätzlich eine Rückreise nach Frankreich und so weiter. Jedoch, es scheint einen Bereich des Romans zu geben, der sich beharrlich dieser Zirkularitätsthese widersetzt, das ist das vergleichsweise konventionell, mit einem traditionellen auktorialen Erzähler erzählte, zweite Kapitel des Romans. Es ist aber nun so, daß für besonders schwierige Ereignisse, deren Erinnerung besonders belastend für den Erzähler ist, eine objektivierende Erzählweise durchaus häufig ist, es “serves as a protective shield” (LaCapra, History in Transit, 70). Im Fall des vorliegenden Romans ist es die “nuit de folie” (GV 236, et passim), die nicht einmal als “vide” (GV 236) bezeichnet wird, wie die der “Nacht des Wahnsinns” direkt vorausgehenden Stunden einmal bezeichnet werden . Denn das ‘vide’ bezeichnet einfach eine Lücke in der Erinnerung, die man mit Anstrengung füllen kann, wenn auch erst nach 16 Jahren. Eine Leere, sofern nichts anderes gesagt wird, impliziert schließlich immer die mehr oder weniger temporäre Abwesenheit von etwas.
Dieses etwas ist aber, um zum zweiten Problem zu kommen, im Falle besonders traumatischer Erinnerung so belastet, daß man seine Stelle nicht einmal als Leere bezeichnen kann, denn es ist wohl, wenn wir die Natur traumatischer Erinnerungen, wie oben angerissen, betrachten, gar nichts abwesend, sondern sehr wohl anwesend. Die Schwierigkeit liegt also eher im Beschreiben als im Erinnern der traumatischen Ereignisse. Daß es aber Gérard gelingt, aus dem Bereich der traumatischen Erinnerungen, dessen Subjekt “essentially passive” ist, in den Bereich der “narrative memory” (beide Zitate Suleiman 139) zu wechseln am Ende ist wichtig, denn nicht nur ist die Trauer und das Verarbeiten ein Teil der narrative memory (cf. Suleiman 139f.), sondern eine erzählerisch glaubwürdige Distanz ermöglicht auch das Ablegen eines Zeugnisses und das damit verbundene Überwinden des Schweigens über ein historisches Ereignis.

Dies ist die entscheidende Funktion des Ankommens, denn um nichts anderes handelt es sich bei der nuit de folie, im Zusammenhang mit dem Ablegen von Zeugnis: “[l]e moment décisif qui fera d’un survivant un témoin est […] la brutale arrivée” (Nicoladzé 233). Die Funktion des Zeugnisablegens in Le Grand Voyage kann gut mit Gérards Ausruf beschrieben werden: “Mais oui, je me rends compte et j’essaie d’en rendre compte” (GV 79): es sich und anderen klar machen, was da passiert ist. Es geht, wohlgemerkt, nicht darum etwas zu erklären, das heißt, nach Ursachen zu suchen. Vielmehr handelt es sich um ein ‘einfaches’ Erzählen des Erlebten. Dies hat verschiedene Folgen, zum einen bedeutet es, daß man auch für jene Zeugnis ablegen muß, die das Lager nicht überlebt haben: “witnesses have special standing as spokesmen for the injured and the dead” (Winter 239). Auch Gérard ist sich dieser Verantwortung bewußt: “il faut que je parle au nom des choses qui sont arrivées pas au mon nom personnel” (GV 193). Wichtig ist, von dem Unglück zu erzählen, von den Toten, nicht von Gérard selbst, sagt er. In der hochemotionalen und sehr persönlich wirkenden Darstellung scheint jedoch durch, daß er die Geschichte auch deshalb erzählt, damit er selbst die Nachkriegszeit überstehen kann . (). Aus dieser Doppelbeziehung, persönliche Notwendigkeit einerseits und historische Verantwortung andererseits, ergeben sich schwerwiegende Probleme. Das bekannteste Problem des Zeugens für die Shoah wurde von Primo Levi beschrieben: die Scham.

In Levis Buch Die Untergegangenen und die Geretteten spricht er von einer Scham , überlebt zu haben. “[D]as undefinierbare Unbehagen, das mit der Befreiung einherging, [war] möglicherweise keine eigentliche Scham, aber als solche wurde sie empfunden.” (Levi, Die Untergegangenen und die Geretteten, 72). Die Scham schließt zwar auch “verschiedenartige Elemente” (Levi 74) ein, aber hier wollen wir uns lediglich auf eines dieser Elemente beziehen, die Scham nämlich überlebt zu haben, während so viele andere gestorben sind. Es ist wiederholt darauf hingewiesen worden, daß bei Le Grand Voyage ein weiterer, erschwerender Problemkomplex hinzukommt:

Unlike Jews, resistance fighters were interned in the concentration camps due to acts of will rather than genetic heritage and, as grim as deportation and camp conditions were, members of the resistance were better treated and consequently had higher survival rates than Jewish prisoners. (Kaplan 328)

Nicht nur hat Gérard also überlebt während Millionen anderer gestorben sind, sondern er hatte in der Zwischenzeit auch ein angenehmeres Schicksal. Dies bleibt ihm selbst nicht verborgen, so berichtet er, daß “il y a encore une autre façon de voyager, pour les Juifs, j’ai vu cela plus tard” (GV 110). Zwar wird in diesem Zusammenhang in der Forschungsliteratur immer die Funktion der Jüdin, der Gérard den Weg zum Bahnhof zeigt, aufgeführt, als der diesem Problemkomplex entsprechende Erinnerungsteil (vgl. z.B. Kaplan 327), ich möchte aber im folgenden einen weiteren Textteil in diesem Zusammenhang besprechen.

Aus der Figur Hans von Freiberg zu Freiberg, ein deutscher Jude, der in die Résistance eintrat, um nicht aufgrund seiner Abstammung zu sterben, sondern aufgrund seiner Handlungen, ergeben sich verschiedene wichtige Verbindungen zu den zuletzt besprochenen Themen. Während der Zugfahrt, während sich die Zugfahrt im Grunde dem Ende näherte, spricht Gérard mit einem Widerstandkämpfer über seinen Freund Hans, der, während Gérard schon einsaß, mit der Nachhut einer Résistancegruppe verloren ging, womöglich aufgerieben wurde. Während der Fahrt und des Lageraufenthalts “läßt sich die Hoffnung, sein Freund könnte überlebt haben, noch aufrecht erhalten” (Neuhofer 112). Später jedoch, als Gérard auf alte Freunde trifft und auch eine Reise in das Gebiet unternimmt, in dem er und Hans zu Résistancezeiten aktiv waren, zeichnet sich ab, daß Hans wohl nicht überlebt hat. Gewissheit ist jedoch über dieses Faktum nicht zu erlangen, denn niemand der überlebenden Mitkämpfer hat Hans sterben sehen. Zuletzt gibt Gérard auf: “je réalise subitement, que nous ne retrouverons jamais la trace de Hans” (GV 213).
Aus dieser noch wenig spektakulären, wenn auch sentimentalen Geschichte läßt sich erst Gewinn ziehen, wenn wir uns die in Kapitel 2.3 dargelegte Doppelstruktur ins Gedächtnis rufen. Es wird im Text, wenn man darauf achtet, sehr stark auf das Konstrukt “Hans” hingewiesen, beginnend damit, daß der mitteilende Widerstandskämpfer nur “une voix” (GV 205 et passim) ist und ausgeweitet durch Namen wie etwa ‘Tabou’. Der entscheidene Hinweis für die Funktion von Hans als Teil der Erzählstruktur ergibt sich aus der Auflösung eines Rätsels. Während Gérard mit einem Freund auf der Spur von Hans ist, werden ihm die Umstände von Hans’ Verschwinden erzählt. Hans, als Teil der Nachhut, ging mitsamt der Nachhut, auf einem nächtlichen Marsch durch die Wälder verloren. Dies löst in Gérard eine ganz andere Erinnerung aus: “[d]epuis que le type nous a raconté leur fuite, à travers la forêt, la nuit du ‘Tabou’, j’ai l’impression que je vais me souvenir d’une autre marche de nuit das las forêt” (GV 223). Diese Erinnerung plagt ihn fortan. Dieses Rätsel wird spät aufgelöst: das zweite Kapitel des Romans, in dem die nuit de folie beschrieben wird, enthält eben diesen ‘anderen’ Marsch. Es ist der Marsch von der Verladerampe des Zugs zum Lager Buchenwald.
Durch die Parallelisierung der Juden, die zum Lager marschieren und Hans der durch die französischen Wälder marschiert, wird, neben der Bestätigung des Erfolgs von Hans’ Vorhaben, seinen Tod betreffend, eine metonymische Beziehung suggeriert, in der Hans’ Schicksal für das Schicksal der Juden stehen kann. Hans, dessen Spur sich verliert in der Geschichte, weil niemand seinem Tod beiwohnte und niemand sein Schicksal bezeugen kann. Hans stirbt nicht, er verschwindet einfach (vgl. besonders GV 221 et passim), und das stellt die Wirklichkeit seines Todes infrage, denn womöglich ist man nicht wirklich tot, wenn man sich einfach verliert (vgl. GV 232f.). Es wird so eine Frage des Umgangs mit dem Schweigen.

Das Verschwinden von Hans ist nicht das erste Mal, daß Vergessen bzw. Verschweigen als Problem, was die Beziehung Erinnerung/Wirklichkeit betrifft, vom Roman thematisiert wird. Das andere Mal betrifft die von Gérard erinnerte Episode mit einer Jüdin, an die sich besagte Jüdin nach dem Krieg nicht erinnern kann, was Gérard wiederum zur Feststellung verleitet: “si vous avez oublié, c’est vrai que je ne vous ai pas vue” (GV 114). An dieser Stelle ist das jedoch noch ambivalent, schließlich ging der Leser mit dem ‘Wissen’ um die Episode in diese Passage, was die Möglichkeit einer Deutung des Satzes als übereilt möglich macht, schließlich hat Gérard die Frau doch wiedererkannt, er kann sie sich mithin nicht völlig eingebildet haben.
Im Fall von Hans ist die Lage jedoch prekärer. Das Schweigen beziehungsweise der Mangel an Zeugnissen bewirkt das Verschwinden von Hans. Metonymisch gelesen weist dies auf die ebenso prekäre Lage der Lagerzeugnisse hin, jedoch schweigt gerade der vorliegende Roman, von kleinen Nebenbemerkungen abgesehen, vom Lagerleben. Es scheint, als ob dieses Schweigen angesichts der möglichen verheerenden Auswirkungen schwer zu rechtfertigen sei. Jedoch stellt dieses Schweigen eine kraftvolle Aussage dar, denn es macht deutlich, daß man etwas nicht aussprechen muß, um es zu erzählen.

The Holocaust as the very figure of a silence […] which our very efforts at remembering […] only reenact and keep repeating, but which a certain silent mode of testimony can translate and thus make us remember” (Felman 164)

Es geht also offenbar nicht unbedingt um ein explizites Erzählen, sondern vielmehr um ein Mitteilen. Entscheidend ist ein inneres Engagement, so wie es bei Gérard der Fall ist, als er beschließt, daß er Hans’ wahrscheinlichen Tod einfach für sich annehmen muß, damit Hans ‘sterben’ kann, er muß ihn Teil seines Lebens werden lassen (cf. GV 233).
Wenn man dieses individuelle Erinnern und Vergessen nun aber auf die kollektive Ebene hebt, denn “forgetfulness […] undoubtedly subsists in a collective version as well” (Wallace 104), dann sieht man schnell, welche Schlüsse dieses in diesem schmalen Roman erörterte Problem in bezug auf das kollektive Erinnern und Vergessen, kurz: auf das kollektive Gedächtnis, zulässt. Es geht um eine kollektive Anstrengung, ein Gedenken, durch das auch Fehlstellen in den individuellen Gedächtnissen ausgeglichen werden können. Die Vergangenheit bleibt ja ohnehin “nicht wirklich im individuellen Gedächtnis verhaftet” (Marcel und Mucchielli 200), denn das kollektive Gedächtnis ist nicht einfach ein Sammelbecken für die verschiedenen individuellen Gedächtnisse. Vielmehr bedingen sich nach Maurice Halbwachs individuelle Gedächtnisse und kollektive Repräsentation gegenseitig, so daß nur beide zusammen “wirkliche Erinnerungen” (Marcel und Mucchielli 200) produzieren. Wirklichkeit und Erinnerungen sind nur an dieser Stelle fest miteinander verbunden. Es gibt also eine Notwendigkeit des Zeugnisablegens, um das Schweigen zu überwinden, so wie Gérard sich schließlich dazu entschließen will, Zeugnis abzulegen vom Tod Hans’. Das Schweigen hat zwar, sofern es nur ein Schweigen über bestimmte Aspekte und eine nach Gründen suchende Fragestellung ist, durchaus positive, bewahrende Funktion. Schließlich aber hat sich das Schweigen als Gefahr für die kollektive Erinnerung herauskristallisiert.

Seitdem es Literatur über die Shoah gibt, gibt es auch das Problem, wie man mit dieser Entsetzlichkeit umgeht. “Holocaust writing is a literature not simply of violence but of atrocity. Atrocity is a form of violence that is capricious, unexpected, and above all, without apparent reason” (Gartland 47). Dies macht es schwierig, darüber vernünftige Literatur zu schreiben. Noch 1994 schrieb der bekannte Holocaustforscher Dominick LaCapra, er sei noch auf der Suche nach einer Sprache, mit der man das, was in den Lagern passierte und die Schlüsse, die man daraus ziehen soll, angemessen beschreiben kann (cf. LaCapra, Representing the Holocaust, 202).
Das vielbeschworene ‘Unsagbare’ hat jedoch bereits Ausdrucksformen gefunden, das Schweigen nämlich, das uneigentliche Sprechen und das Fragment, in dem oftmals beides zusammenkommt. Problematisch wird, wie wir gesehen haben, das Schweigen erst in dem Augenblick, in dem es ein Verschweigen wird. Aber dieses Verschweigen setzt ein Verstandenes voraus, das ver-schwiegen werden muß. In der Literatur über die Shoah muß jedoch Zeugnis abgelegt werden von etwas, das nicht so einfach zu verstehen ist und über das noch viel schwieriger zu erzählen ist.
Wittgenstein schrieb im Tractatus, worüber man nicht sprechen könne, darüber solle man schweigen. Das trifft auch auf den vorliegenden Roman zu. Man soll unbedingt sprechen über die Shoah, aber wenn man dies nicht vermag so soll man in andere Möglichkeiten ausweichen, wie der Roman demonstriert, kann das Schweigen eines davon sein. Es ist besser zu schweigen als nichts zu sagen, und etwas muß passieren.
Und schließlich kann man immer auch Berichte, Zeugenaussagen unter dem Aspekt betrachten, daß das “Schreiben eines Überlebenden nach dem Holocaust […] der Beweis dafür [ist], daß er über die ‘Endlösung’ gesiegt hat” (Young 69). “The literature of silence is not without a voice; it whispers of a new life” (Hassan 201), und obwohl dieser Roman nicht auf einer versöhnlichen Note endet, was bei dem Thema auch eher unangebracht wäre, steckt in der erzählerischen Kraft, die den Roman vorantreibt tatsächlich der Keim von etwas Neuem.

Agamben, Giorgio. Was von Auschwitz bleibt: Das Archiv und der Zeuge. Frankfurt a. M.:
Suhrkamp, 2003.
Bartsch, Renate. Memory and Understanding: Concept formation in Proust’s A la recherche du temps perdu. Amsterdam/Philadephia: Benjamins, 2005.
Brewer, William F. “What is recollective memory?” Remembering our past: Studies in autobiographical memory. Ed. David C. Rubin. Cambridge: Cambridge U.P., 1996. 19-66.
Bublitz, Wolfram. “It utterly boggles the mind: Knowledge, common ground and coherence”
Language and Memory: Aspects of Knowledge Representation. Ed. Hanna Pishwa. Berlin/New York: De Gruyter, 2006. 359-386.
Caruth, Cathy. “Trauma als historische Erfahrung: Die Vergangenheit einholen” ‘Niemand zeugt für
den Zeugen’: Erinnerungskultur und historische Verantwortung nach der Shoah. Ed. Ulrich
Baer. Frankfurt a.M.: Suhrkamp, 2000. 84-100.
Dana, Catherine. Fictions pour mémoire: Camus, Perec et l’écriture de la shoah. Paris: L’Harmattan, 1998.
De Man, Paul. The Rhetoric of Romanticism. New York: Columbia UP, 1984.
Dunker, Axel. Die anwesende Abwesenheit: Literatur im Schatten von Auschwitz. München: Fink,
2003.
Faber, Richard. Erinnern und Darstellen des Unauslöschlichen: Über Jorge Semprúns KZ-Literatur.
Berlin: edition tranvia, 1995.
Felman, Shoshana. “After the Apocalypse: Paul de Man and the Fall to Silence” Testimony: Crises of Witnessing in Literature, Psychoanalysis, and History. New York/London: Routledge, 1992. 120-165.
Ferrán, Ofelia. “‘Cuanto más escribido, más me queda por decir’: Memory, Trauma, and Writing in the Work of Jorge Semprún” MLN 116 (2001): 266-294.
Fitzgerald, J.M. “Autobiographical Memory and Conceptualizations of the Self” Theoretical Perspectives on Autobiographical Memory. Ed. Martin A. Conway, David C. Rubin und Hans Spinnler. Dordrecht/Boston/London: Kluwer, 1992. 99-114.
Gartland, Patricia A. “Three Holocaust Writers: Speaking the Unspeakable” Critique 25 (1983): 45-56.
Genette, Gérard. Figures III. Paris: Du Seuil, 1972.
Haft, Cynthia. The Theme of Nazi Concentration Camps in French Literature. The Hague/Paris: Mouton, 1973.
Hassan, Ihab. The Literature of Silence: Henry Miller and Samuel Beckett. New York: Knopf, 1967.
Helstrup, Tore; Rosanna de Beni; Cesare Cornoldi, Asher Koriat. “Memory Pathways: Involuntary and
voluntary processes in retrieving personal memories” Everyday Memory. Ed. Sven
Magnussen und Tore Helstrup. Hove/New York: Psychology Press, 2007. 291-316.
Kandel, Eric R. In Search Of Memory: The Emergence of a New Science of Mind. New York/
London: Norton, 2006.
Kaplan, Brett Ashley. “‘The Bitter Residue of death’: Jorge Semprun and the Aesthetics of Holocaust Memory” Comparative Literature (2003): 320-337.
Küster, Lutz. Obsession der Erinnerung: das literarische Werk Jorge Semprúns. Frankfurt a.M.: Vervuert, 1989.
LaCapra, Dominick. Representing the Holocaust: History, Theory, Trauma. Ithaca/London: Cornell U.P., 1994.
LaCapra, Dominick. History in Transit: Experience, Identity, Critical Theory. Ithaka/London: Cornell
UP, 2004.
Langer, Lawrence. “Die Zeit der Erinnerung: Zeitverlauf und Dauer in Zeugenaussagen von
Überlebenden des Holocaust” ‘Niemand zeugt für den Zeugen’: Erinnerungskultur und
historische Verantwortung nach der Shoah. Ed. Ulrich Baer. Frankfurt a.M.: Suhrkamp, 2000.
53-67.
Laub, Dori. “An Event without a Witness: Truth, Testimony and Survival” Testimony: Crises of Witnessing in Literature, Psychoanalysis, and History. New York/London: Routledge, 1992. 75-93.
Lebow, Richard Ned. “The Memory of Politics in Postwar Europe” The Politics of Memory in Postwar Europe. Ed. Richard Ned Lebow, Wulf Kansteiner and Claudio Fogu. Durham/London: Duke U.P., 2006. 1-39.
Lejeune, Philippe. Le Pacte Autobiographique: nouvelle edition augmentée. Paris: Du Seuil, 1996.
Lejeune, Philippe. “Avant-propos” Genèses du “Je”: Manuscrits et autobiographie. Ed. Philippe Lejeune und Catherine Viollet. Paris: CNRS Editions, 2001. 7-14.
Levi, Primo. Die Untergegangenen und die Geretteten. München/Wien: Hanser, 1990.
Levi, Primo. Ist das ein Mensch? München: dtv, 1992.
Marcel, Jean-Christophe, Laurent Mucchielli. “Eine Grundlage des lien social: das kollektive Gedächtnis nach Maurice Halbwachs” Maurice Halbwachs: Aspekte des Werks. Ed. Stephan Egger. Konstanz: UVK, 2003. 191-228.
Möckel, Klaus. “Bücher wider das Vergessen” Sinn und Form 18 (1966): 1050-1060.
Neuhofer, Monika. “Écrire un seul livre, sans cesse renouvelé”: Jorge Sempruns literarische Auseinandersetzung mit Buchenwald. Frankfurt a.M.: Klostermann, 2006.
Nicoladzé, Françoise. La deuxième vie de Jorge Semprun: Une écriture tressée aux spirales de l’Histoire. Castelnau-le-nez: Climats, 1997.
Rosenfeld, Alvin. Ein Mund voll Schweigen: Literarische Reaktionen auf den Holocaust. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2000.
Schacter, Daniel L. Searching for Memory: The Brain, the Mind, and the Past. New York: Basic, 1996.
Schacter, Daniel L. Aussetzer: Wie wir vergessen und uns erinnern. Übers. Hainer Kober. Bergisch Gladbach: Lübbe, 2001.
Semprun, Jorge. Le Grand Voyage. Paris: Folio, 1972.
Shabad, Peter. “The most intimate of creations: Symptoms as Memorials to One’s Lonely Suffering” Symbolic Loss: The Ambiguity of Mourning and Memory at Century’s End. Ed. Peter Homans. 197-212.
Sodi, Risa. “The Rhetoric of the Univers Concentrationnaire” Memory and Mastery: Primo Levi as Writer and Witness. Ed. Roberta S. Kremer. Albany: State University of NY Press, 2001.
35-59.
Suleiman, Susan Rubin. Crises of Memory and the Second World War. Cambridge: Harvard U.P.,
2000.
Thompson, Richard F.; Stephen A. Madison. Memory: The Key To Consciousness. Washington, D.C.: Joseph Henry Press, 2005.
Tschuggnall, Karoline. Sprachspiele des Erinnerns: Lebensgeschichte, Gedächtnis und Kultur. Gießen: Psychosozial-Verlag, 2004.
Wallace, Nathaniel. “Cultural Dormancy and Collective Memory from the Book of Genesis to Aharon Appelfeld” The Conscience of Humankind: Literature and Traumatic Experiences. Ed. Elrud Ibsch. Amsterdam/Atlanta: Rodopi, 2000. 101-115.
Weigel, Sigrid. “Télescopage im Unbewußten: zum Verhältnis von Trauma, Geschichtsbegriff und Literatur” Trauma: Zwischen Psychoanalyse und kulturellem Deutungsmuster. Ed. Elisabeth Bronfen, Birgit R. Erdle und Sigrid Weigel. Weimar/Wien: Böhlau, 1999. 51-76.
Winter, Jay. Remembering War: The Great War Between Memory and History in the Twentieth Century. New Haven: Yale U.P., 2006.
Young, James Edward. Beschreiben des Holocaust: Darstellung und Folgen der Interpretation. Frankfurt a.M.: Jüdischer Verlag, 1992.