#TDDL: a summary. Part 2: The Good

So you have seen me announce my TDDL coverage and then nothing happened? Apologies, did NOT have a good week. Anyway, yesterday the awards were voted on by the jurors, and I thought that’s a solid opportunity to summarize the past 3 days of readings for you.

I split my summary into three parts: the writers I did not like, or didn’t like enough, my favorites, and then a third about the actual results. Here is part 1: The Bad, which you should read first.

My favorites are, in this order:

Helga Schubert

Laura Freudenthaler

Egon Christian Leitner

Lydia Haider

Audience Award: Hanna Herbst

In the first summary I grouped the writers by similarities rather than by chronological order or preference. I would like to continue doing it here, and there are two obvious groups. The odd woman out is Laura Freudenthaler. I’ll begin with an admission: I listened to the story and was bored, looked at the text and was a bit nonplussed by some elements of the style and was ready to dismiss it, until one of the readers I value most suggested I have another look (because of that reader I had another look at Lisa Krusche too, but that did not help. More on Lisa Krusche at the very end of Part 1). And I was wrong. Freudenthaler’s story is an extraordinary achievement. Structurally it moves like a melody, with a devastating, literally explosive ending – and it’s a testament to her skill that a big, devastating, fiery end, after only 8 pages of story, feels earned, and not like a gimmick. Freudenthaler, like Ally Klein at TDDL 2018, does a remarkable job of making anxiety feel real. Moreover, she excels at using real scientific facts about the developments of peat fires or other phenomena of spontaneous underground combustion organically, as a way to illuminate the knowledge we have about her story. As a writer, Freudenthaler has a knack for the curious detail – like the sound of a burning fire, sucking in oxygen, and its similarity to the sound of an asthmatic person having an attack. Freudenthaler connects insides and outsides, a personal violent episode leads us into the story and a massive conflagration leads us out. It touches on political concerns, but indirectly, trusting the protagonist’s anxiety to carry us over.

Much more overtly political are Egon Christian Leitner and Lydia Haider. Both of them extraordinarily Austrian in their talk and both of them explicitly, directly and forthrightly political. Neither of them really helped their texts by reading them aloud. Egon Christian Leitner has a large body of work of largely fragmentary or rather: episodic prose about life on the margins. Unlike exploitative texts, like Bachmann participants Neft and Schutti, Leitner is always empathetic and clear about his own speaking position. The language evades simple emotive tendencies, it doesn’t try to manipulate the reader, it grounds marginalized people in the details of their own realities. Despite the clarity of the language, it’s not plain or journalistic, instead Leitner’s tone is deliberate and clean. His reading, regrettably, was offered in a monotone that emphasized some of the structural repetitions, but undersold his skills at deploying sarcasm and other forms of pointed humor. Leitner stood out, and is one of my favorites because his work felt genuinely unique – not filled with the phraseology of Bachmanntexts past, or leaning on the imagery of 1990s fiction or nonfiction, it felt almost sui generis, though particularly 1970s Austrian literature can offer further examples of work written in Leitner’s style. A similar mixture of sui generis with echoes of brilliant texts in the Austrian tradition is found in Lydia Haider’s text. Where Leitner’s text was dominated by the reasoned speaker’s voice, Haider’s story teems with voices. A text about contemporary politics, violence and right wing rhetoric, it borrows from a completely different Austrian tradition, most famously Jelinek, whose later novels and plays interrogate the violence inherent in common and popular phrases. I will admit, I am not as well read in other examples of that tradition. At the end of her presentation, Haider reads from a copy of plays by Werner Schwab, furnishing us further venues of reference and interpretation. The text is dense, and Haider’s intensely dramatic reading regrettably covered up its details – revisiting it quietly, its well-turned language reveals a skilled writer, with an urgency that’s equal part literary and political. Much of it is flashy, clearly, but the unusual language, the thoughtful engagement with a tradition, and the examination of contemporary issues lift it beyond all the texts discussed in the previous section. Both Leitner and Haider’s texts are unthinkable without assuming that these writers see themselves, as Otoo noted, as citizens as well as writers, and they present us also with an answer to some of the lazy reactions to Otoo’s speech, such as irritated (and irritating) complaint, Otoo were expecting us to learn a bibliography before or instead of engaging with the issues. What Otoo did instead, with several examples early in her speech, is ask for a literature that’s thought- and careful, that considers questions of solidarity, and that brings empathy to not just its characters, but its readers, as well. The jury could have noted any of that or other links to Otoo’s speech, which would have been especially apropos in Leitner’s case, but they decided to ignore it instead.

And finally, my favorite writer of the competition – she was my favorite before everything started and consistently my pick to win it all: Helga Schubert. Helga Schubert and Hanna Herbst presented texts about parents, and they did so one after the other. Of all the writers in this post, Hanna Herbst is the weakest, and on the level of writing, she does not reach some of Lisa Krusche’s heights. At the same time, her texts also do not evince some of the downsides to Krusche’s text. Herbst is not, as far as I can tell, primarily a literary writer – and this text, though it may become part of something larger, feels specific to a moment. Herbst’s text is gimmicky – a remembrance of a father that’s filled with small bits and bobs, frequently unpleasantly precious. If you’ll think of the music of Belle & Sebastian, the films of Jean-Pierre Jeunet or Silvain Chomet, you can guess at the tone. Through it all, the text, however, retains a genuine, a moving core, and unlike other texts in the previous section, never reproduces racism. In fact, it’s the rare text that feels carefully crafted even though it’s sometimes overrun with unexamined common phraseology. There’s a sense of a kind of writing that came out of creative writing departments in the early 2000s, like Paul Harding’s Tinkers. One episode had the father ask his daughter to bring her three favorite books to him, only to burn them without explanation, a story that Hanna Herbst manages to invest with a sense of connection and mystery – everything seems polyvalent, resonating with different energies, a good text. Its biggest disadvantage was to be presented immediately after Helga Schubert gave us a story about remembering a mother. Schubert’s text swings wildly, it can be tender, cruel, warm, violent, personal, political – it’s a rich text by a writer who has been ignored by the literary establishment for a long, long time. A psychoanalyst by training, the prose she published in the 1980s is at times staggering in its use of economy. The story “Schöne Reise,” collected in the collection of the same name, reads like Carver after Lish was through with him. And Schubert preserved this quality. Politically, Schubert had always been complicated, I recommend reading a conversation she had with Rita Süssmuth, published as Gehen die Frauen in die Knie? in 1990, where Schubert evades expectations of feminist assumptions, harshly critical of GDR society and politics. The politics of the story she presented at TDDL were similarly complicated, but ultimately overshadowed by the portrait of a difficult mother – a mother who tells her daughter on her dying bed that she wasn’t wanted, and that she wants acknowledgment for giving birth to her despite that. It’s part of the power of Schubert’s story, that she ends up outside of the hospital, giving her mother that gratitude, without rancor, or damaging resentment. And though it’s tempting to retell bits and pieces of the story which can move the attentive reader to tears, what truly sets it apart is Schubert’s stylistic sharpness. Take sentence length for example – the normal sentence here is short, but not remarkably so; yet when she expands her sentences, they immediately fill up with detail and direction. Strangely, the story never feels like Schubert had to fight to get it into this shape – she’s just this skilled. I feel obligated to state that the story is not as good as some of the 1980s work, but it’s more generous and expansive than that work.

My next post discusses the actual awards (spoiler: I’m not unhappy).

#TDDL: a summary. Part 1: The Bad

So you have seen me announce my TDDL coverage – and then nothing happened? Apologies, did NOT have a good week. Anyway, today the awards are voted on by the jurors, and I thought that’s a solid opportunity to summarize the past 3 days of readings for you.

And boy did we have some readings. There were no truly excellent texts on the first day, balanced out by some odd walks on the Caucasian side, and then there were two to three spectacular readings on the second day, and a solid third day. I’m not going to go through them chronologically, so as not to needlessly repeat myself. Writing about everything at once allows me to be slightly less vitriolic than I usually am – seeing the arc of a year’s crop of invitations is intriguing.

One of the most significant developments was the dialogue that the texts had with Sharon Dodua Otoo’s speech that introduced the events. Otoo’s speech very calmly discussed the role of race in German literature – she spoke clearly and eloquently about solidarity, lived experience, about the room to write yourself in a white society when you’re Black, when you’re Othered, by readers, publishers, other authors. What does representation mean to Black artists? The most urgent question, regarding this year’s competition, surfaces early in the speech: do some white writers write the way they do because they imagine their readership exclusively white? What are the expectations regarding literary “speech” – Otoo cites Chinua Achebe, who declared that “writers are not only writers, they are also citizens.”

And so to these three days of readings, with one (1) writer with Egyptian roots and one (1) writer with Kosovan roots, and everybody else with less complex backgrounds. How did these writers rise to the challenge of being “not only writers, [but] also citizens?” Poorly, for the most part.

I’m splitting the post into the writers I did not like, on the one hand, and a second post about my favorites, and then a third about the actual results.

My favorites are, in this order:

Helga Schubert
Laura Freudenthaler
Egon Christian Leitner
Lydia Haider
Audience Award: Hanna Herbst

This post, however, is about the others.

Let’s begin with the interesting, inoffensive, but banal – Meral Kureyshi and Jasmin Ramadan offered light texts that were written with skill and invested with some intriguing energy, but fell flat, ultimately. Both concerned with questions of gender, they differed in tone – Kureyshi read us a soft, pensive monologue about a woman’s love life. There isn’t one bad sentence in the whole story, on the contrary, it contains several striking observations and comments, but it lacks, ultimately, something to draw the reader through it. The opposite is true for Jasmin Ramadan. Author of several novels, her story is punchy – a sharp look at modern gender dynamics, written in a light, quick style, which, for this kind of award and environment, was a bit too light. Acknowledging the difficulties of calling something “literary” without qualifying the precariousness of that judgment, this text still fell short of what is considered literary, at least in this context. And there are certainly questions here, questions I would have liked the judges to ask, about representation of female writing, and of writers of color, and what the limits of our idea of literary writing mean for this kind of writer, particularly because Ramadan consistently works with the most fascinating notions of representation in her literary work. Hers was the first text, and a fantastic opportunity to tie a discussion of the text into the Rede zur Literatur, which supposedly frames the whole week. Spoiler alert: the judges did not refer back to Otoo’s speech a single time. Not that first day, nor any day thereafter. Not surprised, but still disappointed. It feels off, slotting Kureyshi and Ramadan somewhere into the middle of the field, but it is what it is.

Similarly in the middle, but for entirely different reasons, is another pair of writers, Jörg Piringer and Levin Westermann. Every year, there’s at least one poet – and it is remarkably often that poet who wins an award. Nora Gomringer won the main award, for example. Poets writing prose can be exciting. Unexpectedly, this year, we were offered poets writing poetry. And not just text that is written in short lines. In their readings, both Piringer and Westermann emphasized the structural qualities of poetry. Jörg Piringer offered a history of our current reality, connected to a metaphor from martial arts. He worked in free rhythms, but scrupulously emphasized the ends of lines, forming the poem as much orally as he did on the page. The reading was more rhythmic than the writing – a veteran of the digital poetry scene, indeed, often considered a pioneer, Piringer’s reading was impressively sharp, powerful enough to make readers read past many of the less than sharp observations of history and the present. The martial arts metaphor sits uncomfortably in the middle of a text which does not in any way reflect on the patriarchal nature of historiography, written for an implied audience that does not particularly need that kind of reflection: white, tech-savvy men. The masculine obsession with martial arts fits this pattern too well, not to mention the pronounced performance of the whole text. Still, until I reread Lydia Haider’s remarkable text quietly tonight, I considered Piringer’s poem one of the four best texts of the competition. I was never in danger of considering Levin Westermann’s text one of those. Westermann is an accomplished, widely published poet – and in his text, he shows himself to also be widely read. An early quote from a Matthew Zapruder poem cannot but make us think of Zapruder’s recent, mildly controversial book Why Poetry, a defense of poetry, which may as well serve as an explanation of why Westermann offered up this text. Other writers cited in the text include Rilke, Dillard and Jorie Graham. The text itself consists of rhythmic but irregularly metered and highly irregularly rhymed lines, making strong use of repetition and other kinds of form to produce a formally dense text, which has next to nothing to say that cannot be found in Zapruder’s text. The occasional political notes struck are bland, and drown in the incessant formal games that Westermann, unlike some late Graham, never convincingly connects to something that matters. The effect is strangely masturbatory, a display (sound, fury etc.).

Speaking of masturbatory – male writers tend to come to Klagenfurt with texts celebrating, well, themselves, in one way or another, and it’s never the stylistically brilliant ones either. Last year, an award was handed out to a navel-gazing story of a writer writing about his day walking through his city, picking up groceries (details may vary), having a series of extremely minor epiphanies, presented in the flattest prose imaginable. And the streak continues, unabated, with the next pair. Leonard Hieronymi and Matthias Senkel offered badly written stories that were largely pointless literary exercises with the sole purpose of centering the writers in question, though, superficially, their stories appear to be different. Matthias Senkel presented a story about a mystery, about an archaeological dig, written like a mosaic, composed of sections set in different periods. It tries to use scientific vocabulary to make the story discursively complex, with notes of Richard Powers and similar writers, but he entirely lacks a broader view or any sense of style. His is not the worst written story of the competition, but it’s also not too far off. His goal is one of faking layers of complexity to catfish readers into overlooking the blandness of the actual writing on the page. Some of the dialogue is downright risible, the information in the story closer to wiki-sourced infodumps than to well-digested and productively used knowledge, and the various attempts to play or toy with the reader a transparent ploy to engage in dialogue with a very specific (white, male) readership, which is curiously popular in German literature, as attested to by the popularity of the Barons of Blandness Thomas Glavinic and Georg Klein, both of whom have made a career of papering over poor writing with various kinds of metafictional games, in the case of Glavinic with some additional limp masculinity. Speaking of which: Leonard Hieronymi entered a story into the competition that read like a carbon copy of the travel stories written by Christian Kracht and friends in the earlyy and mid-1990s. It’s almost not worth discussing. Hieronymi, member of a group called “The Rich Kids of Literature” (it’s an English-language title, because of course it is), writes about getting horribly drunk, then taking a trip to the Romanian city of Constanta by the Black Sea, meeting famed Romanian poet Mircea Dinescu. There, he evokes Ovid and his exile, which he wrote about in the beautiful Tristia. In between all this he offers observations of Romania that switch between the banal and the offensive, and in the end he returns, having learned nothing. The expectations inscribed in books like this, the sense of who writes, who reads and who gets written about is stark, but at least, let me say that, Hieronymi comes close to making his politics explicit.

That’s not true for the next group of writers, Katja Schönherr, Lisa Krusche and Carolina Schutti. Let me start with Schutti, because I have very little to say about her story that I hadn’t said about her novels before. To quote my pre-Bachmann review:

Carolina Schutti has a tonal consistency that is admirable, if maddening. In her very first book she zeroes in on a style that seems derivative, but really isn’t epigonal in any typical sense. She doesn’t echo specific writers as much as a general tone. As a concert pianist she has said in an interview that she always writes for listeners as well – and indeed, from the first line you can hear the voice in these books. And you know, eerily, what this voice is? It’s the typical note struck by the average reader at the Bachmannpreis – this measured pronunciation that situates texts right between light and somber, investing pauses and turns with meaning that they don’t have on the page.

And

these books are… specific cultural performances, with a specific audience in mind. Schutti, from page one, line one of her first novel, immediately seizes on a tone and style and never abandons it. Open any page at random, and you can hear it spoken slowly into a microphone in Klagenfurt. And honestly, they probably make for great analyses by scholars and judges, just not for particularly good literature. The expectation behind this style is what’s truly remarkable – it’s an inherent expectation of importance, an arrogance of whiteness that is at times breathtaking.

I also note the sense of exploitation of marginality. All of this is exactly true for the story she presented. Tone, style, exploitation, all there. Again, someone on the margins, again, someone struggling with language. And like other Bachmann-writers in previous years, for example Stephan Lohse, she doesn’t shy away from indirectly using Blackness as a way to feed and expand her already dubious narratives of marginality. Her protagonist, in a moment of crisis, sees a documentary about Africa on TV, exclaiming “Ich bin in Afrika.” Schutti’s text is a paint-by-numbers Klagenfurt text, in the worst way. Her books sound like they should be read at TDDL, so did her story, which she read exactly this way, and she uses the same tropes of marginality to elevate her text into a borrowed relevancy. At least, one is tempted to say, Katja Schönherr’s protagonist isn’t marginalized. Just a regular white female character. But Schönherr also, almost aggressively, makes it clear that she has a very specific implicit audience. I’ll admit, it’s bad luck that her story came out when we are all so much more aware of the necessity of elevating marginalized voices, when people march to protest the disregard for Black and trans lives. Let me tell you what Schönherr’s story is about in the least judgy vocabulary: a (white) woman goes to the Zoo with husband and daughter, struggling with her life, worried she might die (she’s not ill). She sees an orangutan who picks up a sign (we are never told which) and holds it up. A conversation between various onlookers ensues, as they debate whether the apparent demonstration by the ape is right-, or leftwing, or neutral. Complaints arise that the demonstration isn’t narrowly tailored to ape-relevant concerns, and the protagonist slowly comes around to feeling solidarity with the orangutan, who, she feels, should be allowed to have its say. After the sign is abandoned, she acquires orangutan costumes and goes to the zoo with her daughter, costume-clad, with the sign, to continue the protest, until she gets kicked out. To cite Otoo, as the judges have conspicuously not done: who is this for? Who is this about? Who is included, who is not? If every writer is a citizen, and if we are to look at who the writer’s empathy is for, how do we read texts like Schönherr’s? Using the figure of public protest merely as a mirror for a white woman’s ennui and an a fear of death is deeply strange and unpleasant – and shows a profound disengagement with the reasons for such public protests, not to mention other…issues with the story. Similar problems of disengagement are displayed in the text by Lisa Krusche. Of the three in this final group, it is by far the most well written. I admit, I had to read it multiple times to engage with the tone and the writing, but there you are. That said, her story about disaffected youth, a sense of connection with an environment that in Krusche’s pen turns even the inorganic organic, and virtual spaces suffers from the exact same problem as Schönherr’s story. The same questions apply – though she masks it better than Schönherr’s plain offering. The central theoretical text for Krusche’s story is Donna Haraway’s late-career book Staying with the Trouble, in which Haraway completes a disengagement with real, tangible change, with a connection to intersectional feminist issues, in favor of a loose examination of kinship and inter-species solidarity that was a long time coming in her work. This excellent essay by Sophie Lewis explains in detail where the problems with Haraway’s book are. Krusche’s story would have been tonally off in any year of the competition, but it sounds a particularly discordant tone this year, particularly. It’s not just that the police as an institution is noted and dismissed as “maybe inherently humorous,” which, I have no words. The use of virtual spaces in narratives is especially fraught. There are copious essays noting why texts like Ready Player Go are structurally racist, and what the imagination of whiteness in virtual spaces really means. Afrofuturism has offered much pushback to these imagined spaces, and clarified why there are no real neutral visions of the future. Krusche does not engage any of these questions and offers, at the end, a general pessimism, a view of revolution that is colorblind in the worst way. It’s an unpleasant text, masked by a sometimes stunningly beautiful sense of reality, borrowed straight from JG Ballard’s unpleasant dystopias of white distress. Sophie Lewis makes it abundantly clear that Haraway’s avoidance of empathetic solutions to patriarchal and racist violence (in fact, she specifically reproduces racism in the book) isn’t a byproduct, but an essential structural component of elevating oddkins and “kinnovations” over families and the masses of humans. The same is true, though less focused, of Lisa Krusche’s text. To connect the text to Sharon Otoo’s speech: who is its audience? Who do we have empathy for? Krusche’s text is about whiteness in multiple problematic ways. Nam Le, in his sticky book-length essay on David Malouf, notes the role of the bush, the untamed wilderness, in the imagination of colonial settler writing. He writes that for immigrants, “whiteness is our bush” – for Lisa Krusche, the old oppositions are active. The bush is still the bush, dystopian, wild, decaying. The contrast even to writers like Vandermeer, with all his flaws, is instructive. A text inspired by a past that we should be learning to read critically instead.

More on the writers I wanted to win in the next post.

 

#tddl: Germany’s Next Literary Idol, 2020 edition.

If you follow me on twitter,you’ll see a deluge of tweets this week from Thursday to Saturday under the hashtag #tddl, let me explain.

I will be live-tweeting the strangest of events from my little book cave. Read on for Details on the event in general, what happened in the past years and what’s happening this year. Here are some anticipatory remarks from earlier in the week.

So what is happening?

Once a year, something fairly unique happens in Klagenfurt, Austria. On a stage, a writer will read a 25-minute long prose(ish) text, which can be a short story, an excerpt from a novel, or just an exercise in playfulness. All of the texts have to be unpublished, all have to be originally written in German (no translations). Also on stage: 9 to 7 literary critics who, as soon as the writer finishes reading, will immediately critique the text they just heard (and read; they have paper copies). Sometimes they are harsh, sometimes not, frequently they argue among each other. The writer has to sit at his desk for the whole discussion, without being allowed a voice in it. This whole thing is repeated 18 to 14 times over the course of three days. On the fourth day, 4-5 prizes are handed out, three of them voted on by the critics (again, votes that happen live on stage), one voted on by the public. All of this is transmitted live on public TV and draws a wide audience.

This, a kind of “German language’s next (literary) Idol” setup, is an actually rather venerable tradition that was instituted in 1977. It’s referred to as the “Bachmannpreis”, an award created in memory of the great Austrian writer Ingeborg Bachmann, who was born in Klagenfurt. The whole week during which the award is competed for and awarded is referred to as the “Tage der deutschsprachigen Literatur” (the days of German-language literature). Since 1989, the whole competition, including all the readings and all the judges’ arguments are shown on live TV, before, the public was only shown excerpts. The writers in question are not usually unknowns, nor are they usually heavyweights. They are usually more or less young writers (but they don’t have to be).

This year there’s a Coronavirus-related shift online. Only the moderator is in Klagenfurt, Austria. Everybody else joins via video. The readings are pre-recorded, while the judging happens on live video. Since everything is on a three-ish second delay, this might get messy.

So what happened in the past years?

The 2016 winner was British expat writer Sharon Dodua Otoo (here’s my review of some of her fiction), who read a text that was heads and shoulders above the sometimes lamentable competition. And you are fortunate – you can now purchase it in a bilingual edition here and I *urge* you to get a copy. Incidentally, the German judges were still slightly upset about Otoo’s win the following year, which explains why 2017’s best writer by a country mile, John Wray, didn’t win. It’s the revenge of the Bratwurst. The 2017 winner, Ferdinand Schmalz, was…solid. A good example of the performance based nature of the event – having one effective text can win you the pot. It was overall not, you know, ideal.

Given the issues with race in 2016 and 2017, it was interesting that the 2018 lineup skewed even whiter and much more German. It was thus no surprise that the best text, a brilliant reckoning with Germany’s post-reunification history of violence, Özlem Dündar’s text in four voices, did not win, but she did win second place. But the overall winner, Tanja Maljartschuk, a Ukrainian novelist, produced a very good text, and was a very deserving winner. And Raphaela Edelbauer (whose brilliant book Entdecker I reviewed here) also won an award. Three out of five ain’t bad folks, particular with people like Michael Wiederstein in the jury. So of course, 2019 went even worse. None of the adjudicated awards went to someone challenging the order of things. Here is my summary from 2019. It was depressing.

So what’s happening this year?

Somehow, the organizers came up with a brilliant idea. Each year, a writer introduces the events with a so-called “Rede zur Literatur” – a State of the Literature speech. This year, they gave Sharon Dodua Otoo the reins, who delivered a brilliant speech on Wednesday night (read/see it here) that managed to be trenchant and measured and relevant all at the same time. She ended it by mentioning some important Black German writers – none of whom have been invited this year, or last year, or the year before. Because of course not.

As for this year’s field – it’s…interesting. Not for diversity reasons, that’s still clearly off the table – except for Jasmin Ramadan, a writer with Egyptian roots, and Meral Kureyshi, born in Prizren, it’s as white as you’d think. That said, there are two writers this year who count among classic writers in their or any field. Most important: Helga Schubert. Schubert has been an important writer for all my life. She wrote a bona fide classic nonfiction book about female complicity in the Third Reich, the still-powerful Judasfrauen. She also writes short stories which are so unbelievably well made, I cannot help but have the highest expectations for this year. The other is Jörg Piringer, who is an important figure in early digital poetry. I have written reviews of the work of Meral Kureyshi (which is good) and Carolina Schutti (which is not), linked below.

I have misgivings about the field! And yet…I cannot help but be excited. Follow along! There’s a livestream! You can also read the texts during the competition here. So here’s the full list, which I posted below, sorted by reading days/slots.

Thursday
10.00 Uhr Jasmin Ramadan
11.00 Uhr Lisa Krusche
12.00 Uhr Leonhard Hieronymi
13.30 Uhr Carolina Schutti
14.30 Uhr Jörg Piringer
Friday
10.00 Uhr Helga Schubert
11.00 Uhr Hanna Herbst
12.00 Uhr Egon Christian Leitner
13.30 Uhr Matthias Senkel
14.30 Uhr Levin Westermann
Saturday
10.00 Uhr Lydia Haider
11.00 Uhr Laura Freudenthaler
12.30 Uhr Katja Schönherr
13.30 Uhr Meral Kureyshi

 

 

 

A Darwinian-Ovidian Tale

“There are four young friends wandering about in an underground world full of the debris of the past. One of the young people is called Donatello. The story involves a delivery to an unknown address. It is centered on a father figure. What is the text? Both the movie Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and The Marble Faun. (…) Like the film, Nathaniel Hawthorne’s novel (…) is a Darwinian-Ovidian tale of a creature halfway between man and animal”

– Barbara Johnson

#tddl: the winner is…privilege?

So, man what a bummer this day was. Yesterday I wrote “what’s notable about today’s writers is just a continuation of things I already noted. This is the first time that the selection and treatment of writers seems so cohesive – and not in a good way. Following along in real time is like looking at a thesis statement, of a thesis you do not particularly care about.”

This absolutely continued in the award voting. In my German language commentary I wrote a 1000 word mini-essay on how these awards exemplify the typical Bachmann-text and I cannot summon the energy to do it a second time. But the main thing to understand is this: there are always typical Bachmann texts, and texts that are different. If your text is good enough, it will make it onto the awards list even if it doesn’t fit the mold.

There was no room for exceptions this year. The special kind of voting leads to every award coming down to a two-text runoff ballot, so for four awards you can have up to 8 texts competing – and since the shortlist (voted on before the beginning of the public awards voting) consists only of 7 texts, you’d assume all texts get a look-in. Not so. Each of the four runoff votes involved Yannic Han Biao Federer’s text, until it won the fourth award. The winner is Birgit Birnbacher’s text – excellent and fitting for Klagenfurt. Leander Fischer’s and Yannic Federer’s catnip won second and fourth place respectively, and Julia Jost won third place. The only other text that made it into the runoff election was, bizarrely, Daniel Heitzler’s absurdly bad story. Although both Sarah Wipauer and Ronya Othmann had made it to the shortlist, neither of which even received runoff consideration, not to mention an award, which is enduringly strange.

It felt like a circling of the wagons around the cultural capital that is amassed by the gatekeepers represented by the Bachmannpreis-jury and the whole unsavoury theoatre surrounding it. “We are important and the texts we like are important” seems to be the message. As all people of privilege in Germany and Europe and the world are circling the wagons, whether it is men, or white people or the financially dominant class, afraid of losing that privilege, this group of critics, professors and academics replicates a process that is happening everywhere, shutting the door hard on difference. But what today’s awards also make clear is that a solid portion of the public is no longer behind them. In this small microcosm, this is represented by the public vote – which went to Ronya Othmann’s important, excellent text, who thus won the fifth, public award. This tension, the closing of doors by the gatekeepers is regrettable, but what’s most remarkable that the two best writers of the competition are two young women, who have not even published one book of prose – and thus represent an exciting future.

Below is my list of all my posts about this year’s award:

#tddl: Germany’s Next Literary Idol, 2019 edition.
#tddl, Day One: Holes In Space
#tddl, Day Two: A Privilege Sandwich
#tddl, Day Three: Mollusks and Nazis

 

 

 

 

#tddl, Day Two: A Privilege Sandwich

If you follow this blog you are likely not fluent enough in German to have followed the Bachmannpreis livestream (see my post about the  2019 event) so here is a brief summary of how day two (of three) went. The writers who read today* were, in this order: Yannic Han Biao Federer, Ronya Othmann, Birgit Birnbacher, Daniel Heitzler, Tom Kummer. You can read all the texts here, if you are so inclined. For day one click here. For a German summary of the whole thing, which I also wrote, for Faustkultur, click here.

There was a strong sense on Tuesday of what the gatekeepers of culture want to be written and published and what they would rather wasn’t. Yesterday had two excellent texts, Sarah Wipauer’s story, which is clearly top of the class this year, and Julia Jost’s. There was one mediocre story by Andrea Gerster, as well as one badly executed, but interesting story by a very talented writer and then, there was a mess of historical revisionism, with a dose of literary cliché. There was no clear sense, as there often is during Bachmannpreis-competitions of texts that fit a mold and texts that don’t. Day two had it in spades.

The first text was written by Yannic Han Biao Federer, a writer with a perfect biography, who has won several literary awards, and has very quickly become part of the cultural gatekeepers himself with his work at the Literaturhaus Köln. Biographically, he appears to be straght from central casting: academical background. work in journalism, work in cultural institutions, awarded some key prizes, and debut novel with one of the leading literary publishers in Germany. No wonder his story, taking almost no risks, offers such a flat take on personal narrative. There are small metafictional twists, slow, detailed observations, and just enough relevance to save the story from utter blandness. It’s not that Federer’s text is bad – it is not. It reads like a chapter from his novel (review likely forthcoming here) – a consistency which points to strong literary control and skill. The blandness is not accidental: Federer’s story is carefully, and skillfully designed to be bland. One is tempted to read the story and the environment its read in in terms of Bourdieu’s theory of practice, in that the (sub-)field of Bachmannpreis is a very specific field. The judges, as well as the audience consists of people of varied background. Academics, successful writers, journalists, people who have or are working as gatekeepers in various cultural institutions. It’s a big field, but also narrow in that they all share a similar sense of references. They have all read this kind of text before. This is like New Yorker poetry, where, dependent on who is editor of the poetry section, the kind of poetry that gets published almost becomes its own genre which you then can see turn up in all kinds of other journals and places. Reading and rereading Federer’s story, it becomes clear that its very specific kind of dullness – it’s a kind of writing that develops when you write a lot of submissions for places, and have to be aware of word count. There is no description that is wrappped in one, two fitting phrases, it’s all extended to the point of maximum ennui. Despite the author’s Asian heritage, which is also mentioned in the story, there’s also a sense of whiteness about the whole thing – or rather: privilege. This was highlighted by two things: the enormous praise by the judges, and by the next story to be read.

Ronya Othmann was on the mound next and immediately hit us right between the eyes with a fastball. A story that couldn’t be more different. Not drowning in descriptions, she used the names of places and people to carry a lot of the descriptive weight, it is a story about how a young yazidic woman who lives in Germany comes to terms with the genocide committed against her people by the IS. Othmann, trained in an MFA, uses this training to make sharp observations about what temporal and geographic distance means. What language means. How do you speak about something that has never been widely or fairly represented in the media of the languages you use to speak or write. The violence against the Yazidis has often been framed in terms of a broader war against the IS – the complicity of the Turkish government, clearly stated by Othmann, never really plays a role in these narratives. What’s more, there is an obsession with particularized, sexualized violence in the media – what does this mean for a young woman, whose family is only alive due to a quirk of personal history. Without being able to migrate (or having a car), her family would have suffered the same fate as all teh murdered and raped people of her ethnicity who stayed behind. Witnessing survival has a long and harrowing literary history, and has perhaps been best described by Primo Levi. There are many survivors of the Shoah who did not really survive – they stayed alive, until they couldn’t any more. People have been writing about this for decades and it is remarkable and laudable that Othmann found new and fresh literary ways to examine this same issue. She discusses quite specifically the question of how to comprehend the fact that she and her family are alive. Are they alive or have they merely survived? Othmann struggles with the binary language between life and death. It is not an accident that one of the best and clearest books on suicide, which attacks the morally freighted binary of life and death has been written by a survivor of the Shoah, Jean Améry. Whereas Federer’s text turned on a metafictional chuckle of bourgeois life in Cologne, Othmann’s text turned on the question of identity. Othmann uses several layers of writing: there is the typing up of recorded conversations, journal entries, and of real actual travels. The story ends with the narrator seemingly shedding the ambiguity of language, coming up right against questions of reality and speech. A remarkable story – not without flaws, but executed with enormous skill. The first sign that Othmann might be in trouble was the Twitter commentary. The twitterati, among them people with some cultural influence, reacted – oddly. There was a worry (yes, worry) that one would be guilted into…what? praise? attention? I feel that if you read a story about genocide and your primary comment is – “Oh no, I’m being morally blackmailed” – I feel I cannot help you. What is this “blackmail” you speak of? Blackmailed into caring? That’s such a remarkably white statement – and it was sort of echoed by the judges. Hildegard Keller felt she couldn’t properly criticise the text’s deficient grammar with a Yazidi survivor sitting right there. I mean, how dare she just turn up and tell a story that is unpleasant. What happened to the long meandering descriptions of mint-colored walls? I mean, the nerve! Other judges decided to re-open the very well trod paths of debates on witnessing and fiction, on truth and literature. There are literally hundreds of thousands of books on the topic. Frankfurt, for example, has a whole frigging professorship dedicated to the topic. What’s the need to re-legislate the topic? I mean literally yesterday, for inexplicable reasons, a judge decided to use Imre Kertesz’s searing work as a comparison for Silvia Tschui’s German nonsense – Imre Kertesz addresses the topic in his work! To be honest, I am not sure it’s plausible NONE of them were aware of this. The longer this discussion went on, the more it seemed like they needed an excuse not to engage with the text. The unwillingness to have a literary discussion about a text, which is written with such excellent literary skill (if anything, one of its flaws is that you can see the MFA training a bit too clearly in it) struck an unpleasant note this fine Friday morning.

The final text this morning combined two things: being palatable to the judges and exquisitely written. A absurdist-but-relatable story about a woman who’s relatively poor, struggles with a life that is less than she and others hoped for. She takes smaller jobs to not preclude the possibility of writing A Novel, but what sounds like depression, family struggles and other issues prevent her from giving her life a shape that she would be satisfied with. It’s a ramshackle, unfinished, unformed life, like many people still lead it today. Suddenly, a cabinet appears mysteriously. Birgit Birnbacher, already one novel under her belt, writes this story with enormous skill – it is much funnier than I made it seem, it is cleverly structured, addressing racial, gender and other concerns, even metaphysical ones, without ever having to strain. It’s not quite as flawless as Wipauer’s tale, but that’s in part because where Wipauer sticks the landing perfectly, Birnbacher stumbles in the last sentence. If this was a poem, every reader would tell her to just strike it and be done with the whole thing. That seems like a minor flaw in a major, excellent story, and it is. Birnbacher joins Wipauer and Othmann among the favorites to win it all. The judges, meanwhile, agreed. Praise was unanimous and detailed. There was no sense of “we have a thirty-something woman in front of us, how can we discuss a story about a thirtysomething woman,” meanwhile. One wonders why.

Birnbacher’s story concluded the morning readings and the good portion of the event. The two afternoon readings – hoo boy. The first, a story by Daniel Heitzler, is hard to talk about. I mean you’ve all heard of Poe’s Law, right (definition here) – this was a perfect literary equivalent. On the surface, this is just a very bad story. A very bad story, structured badly, drowning in adjectives and adverbs, mindlessly run through a thesaurus, like that high school essay we’ve all seen (“Students: Stop. Halt. Discontinue. Terminate. Cut it out with all the thesaurused smart-person words in your essays.”). I remember, on a literary forum that I’m not entirely sure still exists, someone once explained to me that Julian Barnes’ novel The Sense of an Ending wasn’t a cliché-riddled mess, but specifically invoked the clichés involved in talking about death. There was nothing in the text that suggested that, except that forum member’s goodwill. I mean, the books Barnes has published since have disproved that theory, but as an approach, it stuck with me. It’s a literary Poe’s Law: an awful literary text is indistinguishable from a very good parody of an awful literary text, if there’s no wink in the parody. Sometimes the sheer skill involved provides the wink: Robert Coover is probably the best example: his parody and homage to Louis L’Amour-style WEesterns, Ghost Town, or his homage to Noir novels in, uh, Noir, are written with enormous skill. On the “wink” side of things is maybe John Barth’s The Sot-Weed Factor, which is hilarious. Not his best book, but Barth incorporates winks into the style he parodies. There is nothing, nothing of the sort in Daniel Heitzler’s story. The best we get is a comment in the intoductory video that he’s a fan of American postmodern literature, especially Beat and David Foster Wallace. Sure, nothing bad has happened with young devotees to DFW’s work. Sure. You know I was once at a meeting of the DFW society at a conference where they had a roundtable dedicated to salvaging the bad reputation of DFW’s work, created by his acolytes and the unsavory facts that had come out about DFW’s own misogyny. So faced with a young man, essentially subscribed to a problematic literary tradition, the judges decided that the text could not possibly be this bad – it had to have been done on purpose. i have thought long and hard on the fact that all the judges except one insisted on reading the text this way and I think this goes back to the assumption, shaken by Otoo’s nonchalant interview after her win: “we are smart and important people. A writer wouldn’t dare come here with a text this bad. Ergo, it has to be good.” That this judgment appears to be solely a creation of the subfield of Bachmannpreis thinking becomes clear once you look at the unanimous rejection of the text on Twitter.- there wasn’t a torn opinion. Nobody read the text and thought: oh this is intentional. Personally, I have limited patience for intentionally bad writing anyway. If you make me read ten pages of bad prose that you artfully and cleverly shaped to be this friggin bad, I still have to read ten pages of bad prose. There’s a masturbatory quality to this kind of writing, and let me tell you, I have never seen it practiced by female writers. I feel that says something right there.

I don’t know what to say about the final story that I didn’t already suggest even before he read. Read my original TDDL post for notes on who Tom Kummer is. Kummer is a kind of inverted mirror of Federer, the first guy to read today. Kummer is also a production of gatekeepers’ goodwill, but not by following all the rules and pleasing all the right people. He did it by projecting an image of being “the last Gonzo writer” (snort), a literal quote. The bad boy of literature. He turned up, and read a story in a kind of faux-Clint Eastwood drawl that sounded sleazy and unpleasant. His story, about a limousine driver was unpleasant and bad. For someone, who became infamous faking exciting interviews with celebrities, his dialogue was dragging and boring. The story was entirely without ambiguity or tension. Everything was stated plainly and then, for the people in the back, re-stated. The story is unpleasant start to finish, from some lazy racism to literary and explicit misogyny, as well as the weirdest description of a father caressing the naked body of his child i have ever seen. The protagonist’s dead wife re-appears as an octopus-like monster, the only other woman, an accomplished researcher, is, wait for it, an antifeminist who produces a drug to further male sexual enjoyment, because, no kidding, we have too long been interested only in female lust and pleasure – which, I mean, she has never seen any porn or TV or movies, I assume? Or commercials? I mean, what? And for some reason, this turns the protagonist on to the point of considering sexually assaulting his passenger, a thought that he discards after a long struggle. There are no, zero, zilch redeeming qualities in this story, but its invitation shines a light on what’s acceptable and what’s not. Writing a story about genocide gets the judges to equivocate and stay distant. Writing indirectly about rape, on the other hand, raises no red flags. Tom Kummer and Yannic Federer, each in their own way, offer a take on what privilege means in German-language literary culture.

So it’s a day where two of the competitions two best texts so far get sandwiched by an odd duo. At the end of the day, the four best texts are, in this order. Sarah Wipauer, Ronya Othmann, Birgit Birnbacher and Julia Jost.

Below is my list of all my posts about this year’s award:

#tddl: Germany’s Next Literary Idol, 2019 edition.
#tddl, Day One: Holes In Space
#tddl, Day Two: A Privilege Sandwich
#tddl, Day Three: Mollusks and Nazis

 

*this post is about a week late, let’s pretend it IS “today”

#tddl, Day One: Holes In Space

If you follow this blog you are likely not fluent enough in German to have followed the Bachmannpreis livestream (see my post about the  2019 event) so here is a brief summary of how day one (of three) went. The writers who read today were, in this order: Katharina Schultens, Sarah Wipauer, Silvia Tschui, Julia Jost, and Andrea Gerster. You can read all the texts here, if you are so inclined.

Ah, what a day, what a day! Five women, two science fiction stories, murder, Nazis, and divorce proceedings. I’m telling you, things were on fire! Well, maybe not so much on fire as occasionally slightly warm. Tepid maybe? Look, honest to God, a clear favorite emerged today, reading a story without any recognizable flaws, and a runner up turned up as well, also very well executed, mostly, and the rest, well, tbf, there are five slots to fill every day, not everyone can be a winner.

The first reader was Katharina Schultens. Schultens is an exquisite poet, and what’s more, a poet of the kind that should be easily transferable to prose – long, looping sentences, complex rhythms, all of that. What’s more, there is a strong vision behind the text she read. Not everything became clear – it is an excerpt from a novel, but it appears that the text is a Ballardesque vision of a future (it is set two hundred years after 1984) after some ecological collapse. Regrettably, one would have, given the very real ecological threats today, hoped for a more relevant kind of catastrophe, say, speaking of Ballard, something like The Drought; instead her vision veers towards the post-human, with Vandermeeresque landscapes threatening deformed or changed descendants of humanity. She’s not just somewhat apolitical regarding our very real ecological crisis, which is a bit problematic – but in addition, completely (apparently) randomly, she uses the heat of Africa as a metaphor, which seems a bit tone deaf given that any ecological disaster would hit countries in Africa harder than, say, Germany, so if you are steering clear of politics, maybe not lean into the Africa-as-metaphor too much, yes? I mean, it’s white blindness, I suppose. And then there is the confusion and dullness of some of the fiction. Speculative fiction that takes such a big leap needs a proper story telling backbone – which this text, very specifically, does not have. There are great, meaty descriptions of situations and things, and there are rail-thin, meandering sections of what you’d have to call plot? It is very odd, how strong talent and strong vision somehow leads to a mediocre text.

The second reader was Sarah Wipauer. Wipauer’s text, almost irritatingly, has no flaws that I can see. Last year, a hole was discovered in the ISS – seemingly drilled from the inside though it wasn’t clear who drilled it and why – it necessitated an unscheduled spacewalk to plug it from the outside. As far as I can tell, it is still entirely unclear what happened. As a writer, Wipauer is intrigued by space stories, and by the quirks and oddities of small news stories, and she took this event and turned it into a ghost story set in Austria. There’s everything in it that  you could possibly fit – provincial history, medical oddities, and Wipauer appears to be able to manipulate syntax at will to fit the story and the individual voices in it haunting these events. Towards the end the story tightens even further, including social pressures regarding class and gender. There is not one word too much, and the story wraps up beautifully. No matter what the rest of the days bring – this has to be one of the five best texts.

It is with text three that things started going off the rails. The author, Silvia Tschui, appeared to present at first a bucolic story (an excerpt from a novel), written with tight craftsmanship – oh how I was mistaken. It became clear real fast that #1, she pursued a kitsch kind of writing, offering a cliché depiction of a childhood on a farm, with mild doses of violence, lessons, and the kind of dialogues that someone who grew up in the city assumes are spoken in the countryside. So far so dull, but then the story took a bad turn. I mean, excuse me, for not immediately assuming the worst – but it’s true: bucolic clichés have a special function in literature, especially German literature. Farmers are often used to show a nation’s real backbone, and attacks on farmers are the way the political right tends to frame foreigner invasions. In Germany, the so-called conservative revolution was particularly enamored with that figure – the work of Hermann Löns – in particular the 1910 Wehrwolf – was used as inspiration (Löns died in 1914), and many books in the 20s, and particular 30s, repeated and enlarged these motifs. In the early-to-late oughts, German literature added another trope, that of Germans-as-victims. The Germans in today’s Poland and the Czech Republic and Hungary fled the approaching Soviet army and often lost everything. Tschui’s text connects the bucolic motif with those revisionist stories of victimization. They are all the rage in German TV shows and movies. In Tschui’s text there are German farm boys scared of an Enemy who is sudden, cruel, mean, and is connected, in the broader narrative of the novel, to a East European mythical figure, that the Germanic boys have been told to be afraid. The (post)colonial aspects of German/Prussian occupation of Poland have not been discussed as broadly as they should have, but this text reads exceptionally exploitative, with an almost archetypical and racialized sense of an Other. As a result, the text was both literarily bland and politically dubious. Did this come across in jury discussions? Except for Hubert Winkels’s fairly clear words, the other judges steered fairly clear of the text’s issues. Honestly, what would you expect?

The afternoon readings were less eventful overall – the first story, a story from the Austrian countryside by Julia Jost, was very well done – mostly. A story about an Austian childhood, with pedophile priests, knives, Nazi heritage and more. The story is written with enormous energy and humor, clearly, CLEARLY the second-best story of the day, magnificent in many ways – though the ending is a bit of a dud – the writer had to tie up all her plot points so it becomes plodding real fast.

And finally, the final story – a banal tale of child custody and motherhood – the story itself isn’t necessarily banal – we are quick to label women’s stories as banal because they don’t conform to masculine hero narratives. And indeed, there are issues in the story here and there that piqued my interest – but the story is told with no literary energy, no skill beyond the routine of a prolific novelist. She needs to get from one end of the story to the other – and by Jove, she will get there. Choice of words seemed almost random in its banality.

On Friday the readers will be

10.00 Yannic Han Biao Federer
11.00 Ronya Othmann
12.00 Birgit Birnbacher
13.30 Daniel Heitzler
14.30 Tom Kummer

 

Below is my list of all my posts about this year’s award:

#tddl: Germany’s Next Literary Idol, 2019 edition.
#tddl, Day One: Holes In Space
#tddl, Day Two: A Privilege Sandwich
#tddl, Day Three: Mollusks and Nazis

 

#tddl: Germany’s Next Literary Idol, 2019 edition.

If you follow me on twitter, you’ll see a deluge of tweets this week from Thursday to Saturday under the hashtag #tddl, let me explain.

I will be live-tweeting the strangest of events from my little book cave. Read on for Details on the event in general, what happened in the past years and what’s happening this year. CLICK here if you want to read a summary of Day One.

So what is happening?

Once a year, something fairly unique happens in Klagenfurt, Austria. On a stage, a writer will read a 25-minute long prose(ish) text, which can be a short story, an excerpt from a novel, or just an exercise in playfulness. All of the texts have to be unpublished, all have to be originally written in German (no translations). Also on stage: 9 to 7 literary critics who, as soon as the writer finishes reading, will immediately critique the text they just heard (and read; they have paper copies). Sometimes they are harsh, sometimes not, frequently they argue among each other. The writer has to sit at his desk for the whole discussion, without being allowed a voice in it. This whole thing is repeated 18 to 14 times over the course of three days. On the fourth day, 4-5 prizes are handed out, three of them voted on by the critics (again, votes that happen live on stage), one voted on by the public. All of this is transmitted live on public TV and draws a wide audience.

This, a kind of “German language’s next (literary) Idol” setup, is an actually rather venerable tradition that was instituted in 1977. It’s referred to as the “Bachmannpreis”, an award created in memory of the great Austrian writer Ingeborg Bachmann, who was born in Klagenfurt. The whole week during which the award is competed for and awarded is referred to as the “Tage der deutschsprachigen Literatur” (the days of German-language literature). Since 1989, the whole competition, including all the readings and all the judges’ arguments are shown on live TV, before, the public was only shown excerpts. The writers in question are not usually unknowns, nor are they usually heavyweights. They are usually more or less young writers (but they don’t have to be).

So what happened in the past years?

The 2016 winner was British expat writer Sharon Dodua Otoo (here’s my review of some of her fiction), who read a text that was heads and shoulders above the sometimes lamentable competition. And you know what, the German judges were still slightly upset about it the following year, which explains why 2017’s best writer by a country mile, John Wray, didn’t win. It’s the revenge of the Bratwurst. The 2017 winner, Ferdinand Schmalz, was…solid. A good example of the performance based nature of the event – having one effective text can win you the pot. It was overall not, you know, ideal.

Given the issues with race in 2016 and 2017, it was interesting that the 2018 lineup skewed even whiter and much more German. It was thus no surprise that the best text, a brilliant reckoning with Germany’s post-reunification history of violence, Özlem Dündar’s text in four voices, did not win. But the overall winner, Tanja Maljartschuk, a Ukrainian novelist, produced a very good text, and was a very deserving winner. And Raphaela Edelbauer (whose brilliant book Entdecker I reviewed here) also won an award. Three out of five ain’t bad folks, particular with people like Michael Wiederstein in the jury.

So what’s happening this year?

Michael Wiederstein is a bit of a caricature, it seems to me. I noted his invitee Verena Dürr and the dubious discussion of her text back in 2017 (go read it here), and this year he really, REALLY brought his F game. In the most dubious field of writers since I started writing about the award, he made the…ah, just the most exquisitely bad choice of all. His invitee, Tom Kummer is famous. Now and then there’s a famous writer – John Wray is an example. Tom Kummer isn’t famous for being a good writer. Tom Kummer is famous for being a plagiarist. Caught not once, but multiple times. For falsifying interviews first. For cobbling together texts from his own and others’ older texts. For falsifying quotes and using incorrect details. He was given chance after chance after chance.

German and Swiss tastemakers have decreed: this man deserves more chances. He is precious. He is our gonzo hero. The usually very good Philip Theisohn called Kummer’s elegy to his deceased wife – like all of his work of questionable originality – “moving.” What it is, most of all, is fucking awfully written. There’s a bad tendency in German literature to look at some American writers – Thompson, Salter, Hemingway – and see their simplicity as simple. All of this is facilitated by translation, of course. I love Hunter Thompson’s work. Thompson was a fantastic writer. Not always, not in all of his texts, but his stylistic sharpness and moral clarity are rare in literature. Philip Theisohn cites Kummer’s admiration of Thompson in writing that “Kummer, the last real gonzo, was led by the conviction that a world of lies doesn’t deserve truth either, only more lies, which led to his infamous fake interviews in Hollywood.” – #1 there are still New Journalist writers out there, and the masculinist veneration of “Gonzo” has always been suspect to begin with. and #2, if you ever read Thompson with dedication and care – he primarily cares about the truth. Post 1974-Thompson is a bit complicated in his approach to the self in his work, but the use of fictionalized self, and using your own perspective as a distortion to better see the truth has a profoundly moral impetus with Thompson, whatever other faults he had (he had a lot) – there’s none of that in Kummer, and even Theisohn knows better than to claim otherwise. Kummer, his deceptions, his toying with truth and originality never had a goal beyond the celebration of one Tom Kummer. This navelgazing white masculinity is all too common in literature, and at least half of the TDDL field often suffers from that; and Michael Wiederstein, the juror, is the perfect embodiment of this white male navelgazing element in German literary culture. Da wächst zusammen was zusammen gehört.

The rest of the field is also a bit dubious. Among the writers I have read in preparation, Ines Birkhan is very original but very bad, Andrea Gerster and Yannic Han Biao Federer seem flat and dull. Lukas Meschik is prolific, somewhat interesting, but boring. And then there are the three writers I have the highest hopes for. Ronya Othmann and Katharina Schultens are very good poets – Othmann in particular writes exceedingly well and should be immediately seen as a favorite, based on potential. And there’s Sarah Wipauer, who has not published very widely, but she has a blog here which contains short, exquisite prose, and I have read texts unpublished on- or offline, which are similarly exquisite. Wipauer, Othmann and Schultens, in my opinion, lead the field here, by quite a solid margin.

I have misgivings about the field! And yet…I cannot help but be excited. Follow along! There’s a livestream! You can also read the texts during the competition here. So here’s the full list, which I posted below, sorted by reading days/slots. You’ll see the whole thing kicks off with two of my favorites on day one, in the two first slots.

Thursday
10.00 Katharina Schultens
11.00 Sarah Wipauer
12.00 Silvia Tschui
13.30 Julia Jost
14.30 Andrea Gerster

Friday
10.00 Yannic Han Biao Federer
11.00 Ronya Othmann
12.00 Birgit Birnbacher
13.30 Daniel Heitzler
14.30 Tom Kummer

Saturday
10.00 Ines Birkhan
11.00 Leander Fischer
12.30 Lukas Meschik
13.30 Martin Beyer

 

Below is my list of all my posts about this year’s award:

#tddl: Germany’s Next Literary Idol, 2019 edition.
#tddl, Day One: Holes In Space
#tddl, Day Two: A Privilege Sandwich
#tddl, Day Three: Mollusks and Nazis

 

Diversity: #tddl and the Tin House workshop

If you follow this blog, you may have seen my complaints about Anselm Neft’s reading on the second day of TDDL and its aftermath on social media, where Neft defended his use of racist and sexist slurs because of his use of a specific voice. Of course, his “friends” came out in support of literature and against “censorship” and attacked his critic. So far, so German.

But as it turns out, Neft’s awfulness is maybe part of a larger political moment. I recommend the most recent episode (Jul 19) of the excellent Still Processing podcast. To summarize: apparently, during this year’s Tin House Summer Workshop in Portland, Wells Tower, an established author, presented a text which sounds eerily similar to Neft’s: like Neft, Wells Towers appropriates the voice of a marginalized person, a homeless person in both cases, and uses this set-up as an excuse to be offensive and insulting to other margínalized people. Apparently, there was an intervention there, particularly after a night of reflection.

This is also an indicator of the different ways in which the two counties deal with this moment. No such reflection appears to have helped Neft and the various supportive voices in the German-language literary community.

Again, I recommend you listen to the July 19 episode of the Still Processing podcast.

#tddl: the winner is…

On Sunday, the winners of the four prizes plus the audience award were announced. Yes, that’s right, I’m a bit late. Sue me.

If you feel you need to catch up with what’s happened over the three days of readings – and I recommend you do take a gander – here is my summary of Day One., a day about whiteness and the blindness of writers and judges in the face of it. Here is my summary of Day Two, a day mostly about mediocrity and the praise it can elicit if it is narrowly tailored to MFA standards (in this country: Literaturinstitut (see this review). And finally, here is my summary of Day Three, a day which saw the competition’s best text by a country mile, and one of its worst and if you’re still completely lost as to what the hell is going on, here is my general post about this year’s event. If you want, you can read all the texts here, though you should hurry, they won’t be online forever.

The five winners

So on Sunday, the venerable judges voted in a dramatic fashion. The day was full of surprises. You know what wasn’t a surprise? That the best text, a brilliant reckoning with Germany’s post-reunifaction history of violence, Özlem Dündar’s text in four voices, did not win. It didn’t even come in second, not until Bjerg’s MFA-by-numbers meditation on fatherhood and sad white men had its place in the spotlight.. Last year’s decision to sideline the politically interesting texts for Schmalz’s solid, but politically empty monologue was, as it turned out, a sign O’ the times. At least this year’s winner, Tanja Maljartschuk’s text, was very good, and sharp enough in focus and moral clarity, likely the second best text in a field that was, overall, stronger than last year’s.

Indeed, of the five texts I personally considered best, my three favorite texts also won three awards. Only Corinna T. Sievers, whose sharp text about womanhood, sex and the struggles of addiction confounded the judges, and Ally Klein, whose text about anxiety and panic attacks, a text which I would not have properly understood without help myself, went unrewarded.

The five writers as I would have liked them to win

Dündar did win an award – the third place Kelag award. And Raphaela Edelbauer won an audience award. Regrettably, the second and fourth place awards went to Bov Bjerg and Anna Stern respectively. I want to talk about these for a moment: most observers of the voting that led to Anna Stern award saw judges changing their vote, voting tactically – because here’s what almost happened: Joshua Groß’s bad text almost won, because Klaus Kastberger suffered some kind of mental breakdown and kept throwing his hat in the ring for Groß’s text which was politically and literarily dubious.

It was stunnning. I could not believe it – but in the end the explanation is simple enough. Despite women winning the majority of this year’s awards, the structure of the Bachmannpreis favors men. The reason women did well this year (unlike last year, for example) is that Edelbauer, Dündar and Tanja Maljartschuk have written texts that are generally considered among the best texts, across the board. Nobody could have excluded those three texts from awards. But that a mediocre writer of MFA or Literaturinstitut pabulum like Bov Bjerg not only gets praised , but also takes home an award at least three women would have deserved more, is a sign of a certain tolerance of white male mediocrity – or rather, a certain critical appreciation for a tone and style of writing, a nonchalant irrelevance.

Indeed, Kastberger compounded his sad performance when he praised Bjerg as one of the most relevant German writers of our time – which, if true, is a horrible indictment of contemporary German literature. Honestly, I don’t think it’s true, but it’s instructive that this is where Kastberger’s brain went, this is his category for Bjerg – and maybe that also explains his support for Joshua Groß. Important Male Novelist – a category he leaped to defend.

There’s another little nugget that turned up in the award’s aftermath: Anselm Neft, whose text used slurs and appropriated the voice of a socially weaker person with a language of cliché and stereotype that aimed for effect rather than depth, went on a Facebook rant about a critical voice on Twitter. He defended his use of that language and slurs and assembled a crowd of angry Germans who agreed with him. That crowd contained almost every signifcant participant in the #tddl-discussion on Twitter, plus some of the judges. Everybody agreed that it should be fine to use slurs against Roma and stupid, biased or cowardly to complain about this minor matter. Interestingly, among his supporters appear to be people involved in running the award: in the comments, he noted that someone had told him that he had only barely lost out on the audience voting, which Raphaela Edelbauer had ended up winning.

The whole sorry affair both underlined why texts like Dündar’s that critically interrogate German narratives have a steep hill to climb to win an award like this one, and why writers like Neft and Bjerg will for the foreseeable future have a shortcut to such honors. There’s no topic like the vague sadness of adult white men to win awards. That’s been true for decades, and at least on the basis of this year’s TDDL, it still appears to be true.

be15b04908

#tddl: Day Three: The Best of Times, The Worst of Times

Things are coming to an end. Day Three closed the active portion of the Bachmannpreis with a thoroughly interesting set of texts. Tomorrow prizes will be awarded. At least one of today’s writers should win one, as we have seen the best text of the competition (as well as one of the worst) but we’ll get to that. Meanwhile, here is my summary of Day One. Here is my summary of Day Two. Here is my general post about the event. If you want, you can read all the texts here. The writers today were Jakob Nolte, Stephan Groetzner, Özlem Özgül Dündar and Lennardt Loß.

It was a short day, and not overall as annoying as some previous days – apart from one very bad text, there were two meh texts, one fantastic text, I did not run out of white wine and also I took a nap which is always lovely.

Jakob Nolte, whose novel I’ll review soonish, started the day with a story that seems a bit boring and written slightly sloppily, but upon reading his novel it appears to be written in – his style, I guess? That does not make it good though – it was mostly boring and uninteresting. A couple of crooked metaphors, odd grammatical choices etc. It’s a perfect middle-of-the-road text. Not good enough or bad enough to create excitement, but after day one started with death, and day two started with anal sex, starting day three with a mostly meaningless story about a woman on a beach wasn’t such a bad change of pace. The racial politics of the text were a bit dubious, but so is Nolte’s work generally. His novel uses various people of color to provide meaning and depth to the tale of ethnically German twins born in Norway, which is the whitest possible constellation. In comparison, the story wasn’t that bad.

In a sense the whole day was slowly building to Dündar’s excellent text, as the second writer, Stephan Groetzner, produced a humorous, clever and satiric text about – look, I’m not entirely sure. The text was partially set in Moldova and in Austria, and in its Moldovan sections it sidestepped the usual German tendency of filling these texts up with local color that always feels at best a bit exploitative (see Nolte, Jacob) and at worst a bit racist (see Neft, Anselm). Instead, the text was filled with Austrian terms – from local Austrian myths to Austrian vocabulary – specifically signposting his intentions by having models in Moldova have vegetable based nicknames, all of which were words that only exist in the Austrian variety of German. Groetzner is German, and this rubbed Klaus Kastberger the wrong way – mind you, this is the same Klaus Kastberger, who last year listened to a story about service personnel of color – and urged us to re-learn how to deal with servants.

Thank God the next text was brilliant. Özlem Özgul Dündar presented a brilliant text. A chorus of mothers, echoing various writers from the German tradition (I particularly heard Jelinek, but I am biased) presented the facts and emotions around an unnamed calamity, where neo-fascists burned down a house inhabited by foreigners. The most likely reference is to the 1993 Solingen arson attack, but other elements appear to be referencing other arson attacks that happened at the same time. I say “neo-nazis” but the people involved in the Solingen attack were largely “normal” young men, some with solid background. And in other arson attacks, like the one in Rostock-Lichtenhagen, which happened around the same time, a whole mob joined the attackers. Dündar’s story touches on many of these beats, and also provides a harrowing and moving account of what it feels like to have been there, to have died there, to have survived it. Her textual means were precisely attuned to the needs of the material – and while the text was presented as prose, it showed the author’s background in playwriting and poetry. An enormous text – slighly marred by some of the reception, as some of the judges, in particular Michael Wiederstein, who grew up near SOlingen, appeared to have no great interest in neo-nazis.

There’s a weird thing in Germany where this country has an obsession with Nazis in the period between 1933 and 1945, but attempts to blank out the topic of Nazis after that period, especially Nazis that were born after the war, or even later. That explains why Wiederstein, Mr. No Historical Memory of Events Happening After 1990, invited Lennardt Loß, whose awful, awful text, an excerpt from a very likely lamentably awful novel, is centered around an old Nazi (a “real” Nazi) and someone who was part of the RAF, the left wing terrorism that was particularly active in the 1970s in Germany. There are so many distasteful things about the text, from the dumb use of parallel guilt between someone supporting the RAF and an actual Nazi – but the text itself, with its stilted dialogue, miserable prose and misshapen structure, was almost as offensive on a purely aesthetic level. Loß, with no particular interest in history outside of Wikipedia entries ended day three on a bad note.

I mean it’s a fool’s game to predict the jury but Dündar’s text was so goddamn good that only a moron wouldn’t vote for it to win, but we’ll see.

#tddl: Day Two: The Unbearable Whiteness of Being Boring

If you follow this blog you are likely not fluent enough in German to have followed the Bachmannpreis livestream (see my post about the event) so here is a brief summary of how day two (of three) went. The writers who read today were, in this order: Corinna T. Sievers, Ally Klein, Tanja Maljartschuk, Bov Bjerg and Anselm Neft. . You can read all the texts here, if you are so inclined. For a summary of the first day click here.

The day started with a text about a nymphomaniac female dentist, in a story by Corinna T. Sievers. With a few exceptions here and there, Sievers’s style was exceptionally clear and sharp, mostly, again, with a few exceptions, allowing the writer to modulate events and tone with some ease. Oh, and the story was largely pornographic. The scene ends on a slowly and carefully described blow job, performed by the dentist on one of her patients. This was not a surprise. In the novels I’d previously read of hers, explicit sex scenes were the rule rather than the exception. But it’s worth a closer look. These are novels about child abuse (in fact, two out of three novels broach the topic), crime, alcoholism, dysphoria. Two out of the three feature middle aged female protagonists who are struggling with the pressures and expectations placed on them in some way or another. To note one in particular, the widely acclaimed novel Maria Rosenblatt: it takes up the stucture and language of crime novels, with frightening ease, and inverts many of its assumptions. How does the story change if we turn the boozing detective who fucks around into a woman? How do other elements of the story have to stretch and adapt? Reviews of the book all mention its sexual explicitness – by comparison, just among the books I reviewed this week – I can assure you, despite the incredible flood of penises in Stephan Lohse’s novel, no review focused on the homoerotic or queer centering of male genitalia – we’re used to dick, as described by dudes. So far, each novel makes specific, different use of the explicit sexuality that appears to be Sievers’s hallmark – so if this writer is so clever what’s the point with the story as presented at the Bachmann-Preis? To understand you have to look at the complicated history of the Bachmannpreis. In the very first instalment, in 1977, Karin Struck presented a story involving female bodily functions and was severely upbraided by one of the critics: nobody is interested in the thoughts of a woman who menstruates! By contrast, a few years later, Urs Allemann took an award home with a story about a man who admits his pleasure in sleeping with infants. And there is one more possible contextual allusion: in her introduction, Sievers mentions Martin Walser as a writer she admires. On the one hand, yuck! On the other hand, a few hours after the reading, I had to think of the year Walser’s daughter, Alissa, presented a half-incestuous atory about a woman who uses her father’s money to purchase sex and then talks to him about it. Walser also took home an award – with a story that had possible autobiographical implications. Now, Sievers is, by profession, a dentist, and choosing to present a story about dentistry, when she had not done so in any of her previous novels, seems strategic, implicating her audience in the performance in a way that she could not have done with a written story. Her slow, strangely paced reading contributes to that theory. And there’s more: the reaction to the text, particularly by the male jurors, some of whom, like Klaus Kastberger, joked that they would want to get an appointment at her practice, “though we should talk about the price,” appears to have justified most of her literary choices. The story, much like Raphaela Edelbauer’s story that opened the first day, had significant problems, but, like Edelbauer’s text, on balance more good things than bad things and in my opinion had been the second best text presented at the competition thus far.

This assessment didn’t change after the second text of the day, an excerpt from a forthcoming novel by Ally Klein. Klein’s story did not appear to be any good – bad imagery, a surfeit of adjectives, flabby structure, more like a pile of excited descriptions than a serious piece of fiction. But as I browsed twitter, I came across a series of tweets by Sarah Wipauer, a writer who suffers from periodical and incapacitating panic attacks and as a sufferer of this affliction. She immediately recognized the symptoms in Ally Klein’s text. She was not just moved to tears, but brilliantly explained how the very deficient seeming nature of the text, like its images and adjectives and banal seeming prose was actually further evidence of its literary treatment of specific symptoms, and what seemed vague and imprecise was, in reality a well-made, precise text about this particular affliction.

The morning was brought to a close by a story by Tanja Maljartschuk. Maljartschuk has published multiple award-winning novels in Ukrainian – she has never published a longer narrative originally written in German. That said, her story was absolutely enjoyable. The most classically written story so far, written with professional routine, it is a story about a migrant who is constantly in danger of being picked up by the police, and an older woman with dementia. Their paths cross, as a strange combination of acts takes place, in a scene of biblical and literary allusion, the protagonist steals some money from the old lady, but ends up washing her feet, as he is, at the story’s end, arrested, with certain doom in his future. The benign theft has echoes of two texts in particular – there’s the encounter of Bishop Myriel and Jean Valjean in Hugo’s classic novel – and a sequence of scenes from Clemens Meyer’s debut novel Als wir träumten, where a whole group of impoverished, disillusioned young men steal from an older woman, but also take care of her, in a strange sense of symbiosis between two disadvantaged groups. Much as in Lohse’s racist text from yesterday, this echo connects racial and class issues, but unlike Lohse, Maljartschuk connects the two levels with skill and ease. If anything, the story is too well made, hiding its skill under a clear, startling veneer. By far the best story of the competition so far.

The two afternoon readings were kicked off by Bov Bjerg. I don’t have a ton to say about this one, in part because my initial and also my second impression are/were wildly at odds with the audience reaction on Twitter and the jury’s enthusiastic reaction. I’ll write a review of his bestselling novel Auerhaus one of these days and will use the opportunity to go into more detail. What it is, is a very well made story about a father and a son, about depression and the fear of your child inheriting your own suicidal ideation. I may not understand panic attacks, but boy do I understand that fear. I want no child of mine to grow up suffering as I did and do. And on some days that does translate to: I want no child(ren). That said, the story is incredibly flat and boring and banal – incredibly so. It’s not its simplicity. I love well made simplicity. But I think the right comparison here is with the Maljartschuk story that preceded it. Both texts were well made, but while the achievement of Maljartschuk’s story is that of an experienced writer who has worked on their craft – the “well-made” aspect of Bov Bjerg text is that of MFA-taught well made writing. I have complained about the MFA-taught slickness before, particularly about the two major MFA mills in Germany, the Literaturinstituts in Leipzig and Hildesheim. I believe that the positive reaction to the story and the inability to see the exceptionally formulaic nature of its achievement (in other words, it’s literally institutionally well-made not literarily well made) is connected to the way the literary critical system in this country is set up – with Leipzig and Hildesheim producing a specific kind of writing, influencing the critics’s sense of the literary field – and in turn, the critics’s expectations shaping what is taught as a “well-made story” in Leipzig and Hildesheim. In a sense, this story was made for this stage, in a terribly boring cercle vicieux. This is not a bad story by any means, just an awfully dull one, the wrong kind of well made, with a fundamental expectation of universality that is typical of white men, which is why the lack of diversity this year is such a problem.

At least with the day’s final story, written and presented by Anselm Neft, we were back on more reliably German ground, as Neft appropriated the experience of marginalized people, used racist slurs against Roma, absolutely crowded his text with clichés and sloppy prose, and was generally not so much an embarrassment to the proceedings, but a solid representation of a year of this award with the largest percentage of German writers of recent years (Edelbauer was the only Austrian writer on the list this year). I admit, reader, I fell asleep during the story. I reread it later, but honestly, it wasn’t even offensive enough to keep yours truly awake.

Tomorrow’s group of writers is odd. I have no sense of who I really want to win the award. Tomorrow starts with Jakob Nolte, whose well received last novel is actually pretty bad (review forthcoming), and Stephan Groetzner, who reads exceptionally obnoxiously. God knows.

+

#tddl: Day One, the Great White Nope

If you follow this blog you are likely not fluent enough in German to have followed the Bachmannpreis livestream (see my post about the event) so here is a brief summary of how day one (of three) went. The writers who read today were, in this order: Raphaela Edelbauer, Martina Clavadetscher, Stephan Lohse, Anna Stern and Joshua Groß. You can read all the texts here, if you are so inclined.

The day began with the writer I was most excited to see. Not because I thought it was the best writer in the competition, but because Raphaela Edelbauer‘s book is such a lovely accomplishment and yet I had no idea how she’d approach the writing of fiction proper. One of her book’s strengths is a sense of how the languages of fiction and science and history are connected – and in her text she achieved much of the same thing. A text that ended up being about the terrors of history implicated both science and the people who partake in it. How we deal with nature and how we deal with our fellow human beings – at the same time, the parts of the text that were fiction proper were not nearly as good as the nonfiction sections. Edelbauer does not have a mastery of the first person narrative yet – indeed most disappointingly, she does not bring the same attention and care to the first person fiction narrative that she brings to the nonfictional work. The prose in the latter is multifaceted and complex, while her first person narrative frequently falls flat. The text overall had a curiously conservative and polished feel despite the author’s young age – the skill in the nonfictional passages still meant that the text ended up being an above average achievement. What a way to start the day!

Particularly since the second author of the day was Martina Clavadetscher, whose novel I loved, and who brought prize winning cachet to the competition. Her text, on the printed page, looked like her novel, short, poetry-like lines, and occasionally poetry-like rhythms and small rhymes even. In the early goings, her text about death and the predicaments of the female experience, was dense with well turned phrases and potential. Quite soon, the text flattened out into – I guess, boredom? As it turns out, Clavadetscher appears lost in the short form – she was unable to impose any kind of real structure on the text, which meandered from paragraph to paragraph. On the way to the end it shed all of the well turned phrases from its beginning and picked up a large assortment of empty clichés. A big disappointment.

Stephan Lohse’s text on the other hand – hoo boy. Lohse’s debut novel, published last year, had an underlying, but underdeveloped queer narrative that was among the strongest points of that otherwise middle of the road coming of age novel. His story is about two poor marginalized white boys – and as in his novel, he has a very good handle on the male teenage experience. The best part of the story is an interesting though underdeveloped queer facet. There’s a twist here though – the main character identifies with Congolese revolutionary Patrice Lumumba – although in a key paragraph of the novel Lohse complicates this and it’s worth explaining in detail: when during a class discussion children pick who they want to be when they grow up, he answers “black.” His teacher – the only non authorial voice of authority in the text – defends him against the derision of his fellow students: being black isn’t about the color of your skin, it’s about how you feel on the inside, whether you are “dem Wesen nach ein Schwarzer” – whether you are a black man on the inside. Like some nightmare James Schuyler had in the 1930s, that’s that in the story. The rest of the story is split between a conversation between the two boys and infodumps about the life of Patrice Lumumba. At its core the story is a story about marginality and struggling with marginality by appropriating the language and experience of another race, but the author never undercuts the basic assertion of the teacher in the story – and is unpleasantly comfortable with giving the boy, who just goes by Lumumba, numerous lines where they boy uses a form of Bantu as a way to fill in the gaps of his white experience.

But while authors can be blind to these kinds of faults in their work, the panel of literary professionals that judged him should have seen and noted the issues. Nora Gomringer came closest by noting that the story is a bit delicate (“heikel”). As for the other judges, they continued their sterling performance from years past by just sailing past the racial or even, really, class issues of the text. New judge Insa Wilke even saw this text as a significant contribution in a current progressive conversation about race – and if you believe that I have a racially dubious bridge to sell you. But as it turns out, her own invitee had his own problems in this regard.

First however, after the much needed break, was Anna Stern. Her first novel was a mess of names and structure, and though her second book was much clearer and more readable, her text was a messy, unstructured chaos that read like a first draft in literally every single sentence. Most of the audience on twitter admitted to being confused, although in text we did not pass, riverrun, past Eve’s and Adam, but merely through the crucible of a text of modest means and no proofreader.

The day was brought to a close by Joshua Groß. I had previously read three of his books though not reviewed here. Groß’s writing is an update on 1990s pop writing, particularly on the German tradition of the writers around Christian Kracht. Groß uses ironically refracted misogyny and an affected lightness of tone and inconsistently applied contemporary references to write a pop cultural tableau without the depth of his forebears. In his 2014 novella Magische Rosinen, his protagonist is a “rapper” who travels to Brooklyn a lot – he’s no Patrice Lumumba, but there’s an uncomfortable sense here of a white bourgeois writer of enormous privilege to use the terms of black culture to fill in the margins of an ultimately meaningless contemporary identity in our social media age. And it’s not just Groß – young privileged white German writers have seized on this moment to explain why they feel so uprooted. Simon Strauß, Botho Strauß’s son, has just published a novel about youthful nihilism that veered – like its author – sharply right. Strauß, like his father, has written a book and essays that align him with the rise of the far right in all areas of German cultural and political life. Joshua Groß’s project – such as it is – appears different, but it’s only different to a point. He’s also very happy to work on shaping white German identity by means of appropriation – and as some of Christian Kracht’s career has shown, the line between this kind of party nihilism and right wing celebration is a precarious one.

I haven’t even mentioned the actual text Groß read yet, but it’s a forgettable riff on American culture, particularly on mechanisms and events surrounding an NBA game in Miami. The text is replete, as all of Groß’s work, with misogynist staples and clichés etc etc etc. The most notable part of it is the defence of the text by Insa Wilke, the judge who invited the author to read. Wilke appears to believe the text is cutting edge, giving a much-needed update on 1984’s panopticon. In doing so, she not only ignores Thomas Mathiesen’s 1997 coinage of the synopticon in his classic essay “The Viewer Society” (and its web 2.0 updates, for example Doyle 2011), but also literally the whole body of pop literature and the body of work of writers like William Gibson and many others. It’s baffling, but it is evidence that the Bachmannpreis, over the past years, has turned into a search for the Great White (literary) Hope, and the racially troubling texts in the last three years are no accident, and the praise for texts like Lohse’s and writers like Groß isn’t either.

Raphaela Edelbauer’s text is the best of the bunch so far, but apparently, Lohse is the frontrunner. I mean who the fuck knows.

#tddl: the winner is…

Today, in an unusually brief voting round, the winners of the four prizes plus the audience award were announced. If you feel you need to catch up with what’s happened in the past 3 days: I did a bit of daydrinking, I have a horrible sunburn from today’s Pride, my cat doesn’t like her new food, and, oh, yeah, three days of the Tage der deutschsprachigen Literatur (TDDL). Here is my summary of Day One. Here is my summary of Day Two. Here is my summary of Day Three and if you’re completely lost as to what the hell is going on, here is my general post about the event. If you want, you can read all the texts here, though you should hurry, they won’t be online forever.

That said: only TWO of these texts are worth keeping around (though some of the lesser texts will become parts of novels and collections): the stories by John Wray and Jackie Thomae. They are not equally good, but both are complex and interesting on the page and are worth rereading. John Wray’s story in particular is excellent. It is by far the best piece of prose in this year’s competition. But, as I said in my commentary on Day One:

Based on the text alone, he should win the whole competition, easily, but with the insurrection of the small minds and literature gatekeepers, one never knows.

And indeed, they picked Ferdinand Schmalz to win the big prize. Schmalz is part of the German literature business, he gives off, as we say in German, the right smell (der richtige Stallgeruch). He is a playwright, he knows all of these critics, if not directly then by a degree of separation no higher than two. And his native language is German. Klaus Kastberger’s huffing and puffing about not getting enough respect from these foreigners on day one truly showed the way. Wray won second place almost unanimously, which almost read like an admittance of guilt by the jury, who was really pulling for an insider but couldn’t credibly have placed Wray worse than second.

Which also explains why Eckhart Nickel won third place. His text is not, by any honest measure, the third best text. At least Schmalz’s text-cum-performance was really something, almost flawless for what it was. Nickel’s story was well made, but uninteresting au fond. Nickels biggest advantage was the fact that he is German literature royalty, a founding member of the Popliteratur scene, some of whose members went on to become influential titans of German literature. He definitely has the right smell. I suggested yesterday he might have a chance at getting one of the awards, but that’s because a similar writer had won a third award before, and because this resentment towards upstarts and foreigners had been in the air since day one. The reactions to the (much better) texts by Jackie Thomae and Barbi Markovic were sad and an indictment of the jury.

As was the fact that it took until the fourth and last award for a woman to win something. The field is split 50/50 between men and women, and on my score board, the four best writers were also similarly split 50/50. In a way, we were lucky Gianna Molinari won that fourth award because on the shortlist was, inexplicably, the unspeakable text by Urs Mannhart. Mannhart and Nickel were both nominated by Michael Wiederstein, who is exactly the worst person you want to be influential in judging literature: well off, white, male, and unaware of his privilege to a pathological degree.

There was also an audience award, but I’m not discussing it. A bad text won it, but the real issue was that Barbi Marcovic’s text, one of the three or four best ones in the competition, was temporarily blocked from public voting due to ‘technical’ issues. Icing on a very unpleasant cake.

And you know what? I have a pile of books by writers from the competition, and am slowly sobering up, and next year, you know where I’ll be? Right here: in front of the livestream, following the next, 42nd, Tage der deutschsprachigen Literatur. Did I get upset at this year’s awards? Sure. But you don’t stop watching basketball just because the fucking Warriors won the Finals like of fucking course they did.

Below is my list of posts about this year’s award:

#tddl: Germany’s Next Literary Idol
#tddl, Day One: the Wraypocalypse
#tddl, Day Two: The Jurypocalypse
#tddl, Day Three: The Nopocalypse

#tddl, Day Three: The Nopocalypse

Things are coming to an end. Day Three closed the active portion of the Bachmannpreis with a thoroughly underwhelming set of texts. Tomorrow prizes will be awarded. None of today’s writers should win one, but we’ll get to that. Meanwhile, here is my summary of Day One. Here is my summary of Day Two. Here is my general post about the event. If you want, you can read all the texts here. The writers today were Eckhart Nickel, Gianna Molinari, Maxi Obexer, Urs Mannhart.

I’m not going to dwell overmuch on this damp squib of a day. Two of the texts were good, but not as good as the four texts I already highlighted, and two of them were bad, but also, somehow, in an underwhelming way. The day came, passed, I ran out of alcohol, etc. Well, let’s get on with things: to the crapmobile!

Eckhart Nickel wrote a story that one of the judges correctly connected to Adalbert Stifter (I have a bad? review of his masterpiece Indian Summer here), but that, in the end, had more in common with that German master of awful short stories, Bernhard Schlink. This was regrettable because Nickel, who is German literature royalty (outside of Wray the “biggest” name in this year’s lineup) started his text with extraordinary skill. From top to bottom, the technical execution was clean and nice, but the payoff was uninteresting. In the ease and skill of execution he reminded me (despite no overlap in plot or themes) of last year’s third place winner Zwicky. It was the best text today and while I’d rate it a distant fifth overall, it’s the only of today’s texts that should be in a prize discussion at all.

Gianna Molinari offered a text based on a real life case where an unknown refugee fell from a plane and died, nameless. In her attempt to give him back some dignity, she uses photos, and a careful examination of the workers who found him and the way the state dealt with him. I liked much about the story, but not so much the story itself? Regretfully, she reminded readers of the many writers in German who did much of this better, particularly Sebald and Lenz. The story was so directionless and boring that the audience, when the writer took a sip, applauded in apparent relief for the story to be over. Alas, no dice.

Maxi Obexer – man. So Molinari did make use of the experience of a refugee to write a German story (to apply for a German story award), but she did it with care: she was interested in that person. Maxi Obexer however also wrote about the refugee crisis, but the story was blind to the author’s own privilege, degraded other foreigners, appropriated the difficult experience of thousands to tell a small story that moved a persona very similar to the white author, who had teaching gigs in Georgetown and Dartmouth, front and center. Obexer is talented enough for the writing to be solid, and smart enough to include some good observations, but the overall feeling was creepy and unpleasant. It came really close, as a story, to offer the same blindness as the jury did yesterday. She also kissed a girl.

Urs Mannhart closed out the day and the competition and, I mean, I don’t know what to say. Molinari and Obexer both used foreignness as a trope and foreigners as props, but Mannhart told a story about wolves and men and rugged nature and horses that was set in an unnamed country (Kirgizstan?), overloaded with foreign names, occasional flat out racism; the worst aspect of the story was the undeniable solid skill of the text. Written in a 19th century adventure novel tone, it had no obvious stylistic problems or weaknesses. Except, you know, for the, uh unimaginative racism and toxic masculinity.

Tomorrow, awards will be handed out. There will be a first award, the Bachmannpreis, a second award, the Kelag Preis, and a third award, the 3sat-Preis. There’s also an award voted on by the audience. As I said yesterday, the only two writers who are on an almost equal footing in competing for first place are John Wray and Ferdinand Schmalz. Barbi Markovic, Jackie Thomae and maaaaybe Eckhard Nickel should be competing for third place. That’s not to say that this sad spectacle of a jury will vote this way. I think that the unbearable Verena Dürr stands a real chance of beating one of the better texts. And the audience is a real wild card. My ideal order is Wray, Schmalz, Thomae. Fingers crossed?

#tddl, Day Two: The Jurypocalypse

So Day Two of the Bachmannpreis ended. Here is my summary of Day One. Here is my general post about the event. As I said yesterday, I’ll assume your German is not fluent enough to follow along, but if you want, you can read all the texts here. Today was exhausting to watch. Yesterday, we had 4 bad texts and one excellent one. Today we had 3 good texts and two awful ones. But if yesterday’s theme was the one of the adult competing with the children, today was the day of horrible jury discussions. I barely stressed the role of the jury yesterday, but each text is allotted roughly an hour: 25 minutes reading, 30 minutes discussion and a 5 minute short introductory film curated by the writers themselves. Sometimes, the jury discussions are about taste, about interpretation, issues like that. Sometimes, like today, they betray blind spots of the jury. Class and race are such blind spots. The jury, consisting of German, Swiss and Austrian critics had such a horrific performance today that I was embarrassed to be German myself (not that there isn’t recurring occasion to feel such shame). But first things first: the writers reading today were, in this order: Ferdinand Schmalz, Barbi Markovic, Verena Dürr, Jackie Thomae, Jörg-Uwe Albig.

Ferdinand Schmalz opened proceedings and it seemed like the day was going to be much better than yesterday. Schmalz is a nom de plume, and appears to be a character. The whole reading was like a performance. A little pork-pie hat, unwashed hair and an excited voice: a reading that elevated a text that was already pretty good. Everything in it worked as needed, sounds, rhythms, plot. This text wasn’t as good as Wray’s story yesterday, but it was good enough that I wouldn’t be upset if it did win the award. A fantastic, greasy, behatted, positively Bernhardian beginning to day two.

Next up was Barbi Markovic, who I had been looking forward to. Markovic, a writer from Serbia, had been doing interesting things with language and literature for a few years now and I was rooting for her. However, the text wasn’t quite as good as it could have been. It was good, it was interesting, and it was relevant, but it needed a good and gentle editor. The story itself, about a family found dead in an apartment, was clearly a metaphor. For what? Well, maybe the way nation states relate to each other or for the way smaller states are subjugated in larger, vaguely totalitarian confederation. The fact that the author is Serbian and her work circles around Serbian topics, seems relevant here. However, one of the judges, Michael Wiederstein, who comes from the area where I currently live, but lives in Switzerland now, proclaimed that texts should not be seen in any such contexts. “I don’t care that the author is Serbian!” he exclaimed, squinting with Germanic self righteousness.

Rough visual approximation of the jury discussing Verena Dürr’s text.

Lucky for him, the next writer was Verena Dürr. Dürr is, I think, an experimental poet who uses the dry and repetitive language of rules and handbooks. As it turns out, when turned into a prose narrative, this is horrifyingly dull. She offered a text about art dealers that was basically a list of expensive objects and of high culture associations. Everybody I follow on Twitter was stunned by the bland and deathly dull nature of the text. It was well made, I mean truly carefully and very precisely done. It’s just utterly uninteresting. However, the real gem was the jury discussion afterwards. Suddenly, judges who complained about a lack of relatable characters in Markovic’s story barely found enough breath to praise this shiny polished turd of a prose narrative. Michael Wiederstein exclaimed how he had so many art dealers among his friends and he was going to show them this story! Suddenly, the possibility of identifying literature and experience appeared, bright (dare I say white?) and shiny on the horizon. Everybody broke for lunch, and I hoped for a better afternoon.

In the afternoon, everything went from bad to worse and I suddenly found myself running out of white wine. Next person up was Jackie Thomae, a writer of color from East Germany. Her story was light but precisely written. It was about a young man of unnamed background who is read by his environment as a Muslim. It’s not relevant for the story which ethnicity he is, because the story’s theme is how his identity is constructed by the power relations around him. He works for a company called Cleanster that offer cleaning services. This is the seventh time working for the company; he’s got a routine, but he’s not a ‘pro’ yet. As he enters the apartment, a few things go wrong and he ends up only partially cleaning the apartment. Wracked with guilt and shame, he flees, onto the next job. The woman who contracted him to clean is unhappy and slips into a strange discourse about how of course these young Muslim men cannot expected to clean, I mean they learned a totally different set of gender roles in their culture. The text is not subtle about its topics: how whiteness and class intersects and constructs subjects in our society. Thomae is incredibly clear about it. It’s a strong story, very clear, very relevant, the writing unflashy but calibrated perfectly. Well, as it turns out that’s not how the jury saw it.

Reading some of the books by this year’s Bachmannpreis-candidates.

No. The jury collapsed in their own Germanic whiteness to an extent that should be part of a curriculum in a critical whiteness course. It was almost like a performance. Klaus Kastberger, who teaches in Graz, said: “we have to learn how to use servants again properly. They used to have rules for that and how we are lost without the rules.” He also asked to be explained the foreigner’s motivation because it wasn’t entirely clear to him. Why would he be intimidated by a washing machine (the story, again, incredibly unsubtle, says, literally: he didn’t want to break another expensive machine that he could never pay for). Meike Feßmann said we need to have a discussion about his cultural background and how it influences his actions, echoing, partially WORD FOR WORD, the statement of the white woman in the story who, in case that wasn’t clear, wasn’t supposed to provide a how-to of white behavior. The protagonist takes selfies “to impress the girls,” but somehow that didn’t reach Hubert Winkels, who thought it was a picture to impress the relatives “in Bosnia, Senegal or wherever” (IN BOSNIA, SENEGAL OR WHEREVER). TWO different judges used the phrase “clash of civilizations” to describe what happened, and Michael Wiederstein, he with the many rich art dealer friends, thought the ‘moral of the story’ was that people should clean more themselves. Kastberger repeated that this was not how you treated servants, that in the 19th century Austrian monarchy, servants were treated much better and we should learn from that and I think it was at this point that I may have lost my mind, my hearing or suffered some other collapse. As a German poet (and, I guess, critic?) I felt such intense shame for these people of similar overall background, I think I may have had an outer body experience.

Jörg-Uwe Albig then closed the day with a strange masculine fantasy, overwritten and undercooked. It is fitting after all that happened that the day ended with a writer called “Jörg-Uwe.” His story is about a man who was left by his girlfriend, has an exoticizing fantasy sequence in Ethiopia (because for Germans, somehow, going to Africa to find yourself is a thing. Yes, I know, Henderson the Rain King exists but, you know, Bellow, he of the “show me the Zulu Tolstoy” was a racist). In Africa he sexually assaults a church (yes, yes, don’t ask). I’m not sure what happens at the end because I stopped caring.

In summary: after today, I think, by rights Wray should still be leading the pack. I think Schmalz, Markovic and Thomae would all deserve one of the two other awards, but except for maybe Schmalz, they didn’t really challenge Wray’s claim to first place. And after today, I think Wray is damn lucky he’s white.

#tddl: Day One, the Wraypocalypse.

If you follow this blog you are likely not fluent enough in German to have followed the Bachmannpreis livestream (see my post about the event) so here is a brief summary of how day one (of three) went. The writers who read today were, in this order: Karin Peschka, Björn Treber, John Wray, Noemi Schneider and Daniel Goetsch. You can read all the texts here, if you are so inclined.

Karin Peschka started the day with a text set in a post-war devastation, with a protagonist just called “Kindl” (“the child”). The writing is intentionally simple and stark, with vast sequences of dull, repetitive description that urgently required culling, and some occasionally very strong images. Peschka’s text was very weak, relying too much on the setting and the protagonist to carry the rest of the text; it was derivative, most of all. Yet, in hindsight, with all the other terrible texts behind me, it wasn’t that bad. At least it was competent and occasionally interesting.

If you’re wondering how to properly watch the competition: like this. On TV, with twitter on the laptop and a coffee mug full of cheap white wine. At least that’s how yours truly does it.

Björn Treber, a very young writer with just a few small publications under his belt offered an unusually brief text, basically a long description of a funeral. It read like an overnight improvisiation before the deadline to hand in the text. There was nothing at stake, nothing interesting, no tension, no direction, no discernable stylistic interest. There were hints of interesting directions, but Treber never explored them. He’s clearly not untalented, but this read more like an early early draft that you’d bring into a writing workshop, to tease out the hints in it of identity, heritage and existentialism. It did not read like a story offered at Germany’s second most prestigious literary award.

John Wray was third, and boy did he save the day. You know, this felt like seeing LeBron playing against a high school basketball team. After Treber’s story that was barely acceptable as homework in a creative writing class, John Wray offered a modulated, shifting story that touched on culture, history, literature, power, gender and race. It told a story that is impossible to summarize, but one that reflects on its own structure, its own language, that touches on realism, science fiction, historical fiction and the current taste for dystopian writing. In it we had a barely-successful writer from Brooklyn, a sister with a mental illness who imagines a story, an ornithologist whose encounter with natives is a paraphrase of turn of the century anthropology, a fascist leader and more. There is a prominent nod (I think) to Alfred Korzybski in there and many other writers. All of this in just a handful of pages that took 25 minutes to read aloud in a slow, somber voice. I wouldn’t be surprised if the story’s movements and turns couldn’t be made to fit the Chaucerian form of the Madrigal (the return of the original rhymes made me think of that). All of this was made without any kind of literary arrogance – you could tell the skill and the exhilaration of the writing throughout but it also reads extremely light. This is not just the best story of the day – but one of the best stories, in the way it is condensed and shaped, I’ve read all year. Everybody broke for lunch and I refilled my coffee mug with white wine and ate some crackers.

This is my cat’s reaction to hearing Noemi Schneider read. I have to say, I agree with her on this!

After the break, 35 year old Noemi Schneider read a text that was, in sound, skill and attitude, a text I’d have expected of a precocious 20 year old. In fact. Young Ronja Rönne read a text in a vaguely similar vein last year. There’s a lot of irony in it, playing with language, expectations etc etc. but it is also just plain terrible. There’s nothing redeeming about the text in any way. Amateurish, flat, and boring, it also left a bad taste in my mouth because Schneider is not above toying with exoticism to flesh out aspects of her characters’ relationship to reality. That’s not new: in her recent novel, she similarly used foreignness as a metaphor, and an asylum seeker as a prop to tell a story about Germany and family relations in this country. Awful, unpleasant and bad. Suddenly, Peschka’s story didn’t seem quite as awful.

The final reader was Daniel Goeltsch, who, look. It was the last reader, first day, maybe that’s why he seemed insufferably dull, but BOY O BOY was he dull. A story about postwar Germany that was so terrible and dull that the discovery that it is an excerpt from a novel made me recoil in shock. Weaponized boredom, is what it was. Lazy imagery, terrible writing about physical intimacy, wave after wave of irrelevant description and, I think?, plot? I don’t think Goeltsch is all bad. I started reading his novel Ein Niemand an hour ago to review it on the blog and it’s not bad? I think Goeltsch needs a loving but mean editor. This story didn’t really go anywhere, it was written in the most plodding dull German I can imagine this side of Martin Walser, and I was so disinterested, I barely paid attention to the jury squabbling over the text.

I don’t know if Wray will win the whole thing. The judges seemed to believe his text was too good (I wish I was kidding) and they still licked their wounds over finding out, post-factum, that last year’s winner, the brilliant Sharon Dodua Otoo hadn’t heard of the competition before. As one judge groused: “at least he’s heard of us before, unlike THAT PERSON last year. He knows there are smart people sitting here.” That person? Exqueeze me? You mean last year’s runaway winner? Anyway, that might count against him. Plus there’s a real heavyweight to come, Barbi Markovic, a genuinely excellent writer. However, Bachmannpreis gives out three awards, and Wray should win one of them easily. Based on the text alone, he should win the whole competition, easily, but with the insurrection of the small minds and literature gatekeepers, one never knows.

#tddl: Germany’s Next Literary Idol

imageIf you follow me on twitter, you’ll see a deluge of tweets this week from Thursday to Saturday under the hashtag #tddl, let me explain. I will be live-tweeting the strangest of events from my little smelly book cave.

Once a year, something fairly unique happens in Klagenfurt, Austria. On a stage, a writer will read a 25-minute long prose(ish) text, which can be a short story, an excerpt from a novel, or just an exercise in playfulness. All of the texts have to be unpublished, all have to be originally written in German (no translations). Also on stage: 9 to 7 literary critics who, as soon as the writer finishes reading, will immediately critique the text they just heard (and read; they have paper copies). Sometimes they are harsh, sometimes not, Frequently they argue among each other. The writer has to sit at his desk for the whole discussion, without being allowed a voice in it. This whole thing is repeated 18 to 14 times over the course of three days. On the fourth day, 4 prizes are handed out, three of them voted on by the critics (again, votes that happen live on stage), one voted on by the public. All of this is transmitted live on public TV and draws a wide audience.

This, a kind of “German language’s next (literary) Idol” setup, is an actually rather venerable tradition that was instituted in 1977. It’s referred to as the “Bachmannpreis”, an award created in memory of the great Austrian writer Ingeborg Bachmann, who was born in Klagenfurt. The whole week during which the award is competed for and awarded is referred to as the “Tage der deutschsprachigen Literatur” (the days of German-language literature). Since 1989, the whole competition, including all the readings and all the judges’ arguments are shown on live TV, before, the public was only shown excerpts. The writers in question are not usually unknowns, nor are they usually heavyweights. They are all more or less young writers but they don’t have to be novelists.

Last year’s winner was British expat writer Sharon Dodua Otoo (here’s my review of some of her fiction), who read a text that was heads and shoulders above the sometimes lamentable competition. This year’s lineup, with the exception of an interesting writer here and there seems similar in quality, minus Otoo and Tomer Gardi whose novel I’ve also reviewed.

The great exception is John Wray. John Wray is an American novelist with Austrian roots who writes in English. I’ve interviewed John Wray on Bookbabble years and years ago. See here. Really, listen. He’s luvverly. On this blog I reviewed his debut novel The Right Hand of Sleep and his third novel Lowboy. His second novel, not under review, is also quite excellent! I’m interested in what text he will be reading. Below is the full list of authors. If you check their publications, you’ll see a sad and unsurprising number of white German language writers writing about immigration and/or people of color from a very Germanic perspective. If you’ve read Jenny Erpenbeck’s awful recent novel, imagine that, but worse. And yet…I cannot help but be excited. Follow along! There’s a livestream! You can also read the texts during the competition here. So here’s the full list:

  • Jörg-Uwe Albig
  • Verena Dürr
  • Daniel Goetsch
  • Urs Mannhart
  • Barbi Markovic
  • Gianna Molinari
  • Eckhart Nickel
  • Maxi Obexer
  • Karin Peschka
  • Ferdinand Schmalz
  • Noemi Schneider
  • Jackie Thomae
  • Björn Treber
  • John Wray

Bachmannpreis

Nobel Prize 2016: My picks.

Since I pick wrong every year, I tend to re-post versions of my old picks. There’s a difference this year. I have insisted every year on a nonfiction award (my picks were usually Umberto Eco and Hilary Putnam, both of whom died since last year’s award), and last year, finally, the quite excellent Svetlana Alexievich won a nonfiction award after a decades-long drought. I have read little of her work, my favorite is a book on suicide, Зачарованные смертью, literally “enchanted with death.” A writer who observes a society enchanted with death, with pain, a society frayed from the pressures of decaying or rotten ideologies. A well deserved award, even if the subsequent deaths of my usual picks did make me regret the missed opportunity, so to say, of giving the award to one of those two.

The feeling of a missed opportunity for an award for the same demographic has been a problem, I feel, for this last group of winners. I probably said this before, but if they wanted to give it to a white, female, important, accomplished Canadian writer of short stories, why not give it to Mavis Gallant, who, in my opinion, is significantly better than Munro. Apart from Munro, the award, long criticized for having too many Europeans, has turned, almost defiantly, more European than at any period since the 1970s. For all the talk about not awarding American literature for its insularity – Patrick Modiano is an incredibly insular writer. He draws mostly in French tradition, works within French literary culture, uses French forms and structures. I wrote a longish piece on Modiano in the wake of his win, you can read it here. He’s very good, but he’s just not Nobel material. None of his work really stands out from the larger body of French postwar literature that examines collective and personal memory. A French Nobel prize – how, after the already dubious (but at least interesting) election of Le Clèzio, could it not have gone to Yves Bonnefoy? Or  Michel Tournier, whose worst work arguably outstrips Modiano’s best? Or Michel Butor? Or if French language, why not Assia Djebar? Djebar, Bonnefoy, Tournier and Butor have all died since Modiano won, all of them with more international resonance and importance, more part of international literary culture and conversations. Not to mention that all four of them are significantly more excellent as writers.

And while we discuss whether another white or European writer should win it (Banville, Roth, Fosse, Oates are among the names I heard over the past weeks), we hear nothing about writers like Nigerian novelist Buchi Emecheta, who writes excellent novels about the female experience in a country between colonialism and modernity. She’s smart, good, popular and significant and yet people dare to name Philip Roth as a deserving writer. Or how about Guyanese novelist, poet and essayist Wilson Harris. Harris is 95 years old, and has not won a Nobel prize yet despite having written an important and inarguably excellent (and extensive) body of work that’s insightful, experimental, political and addictively readable. Why wasn’t he picked yet or why isn’t he at least being prominently discussed? There is an odd sense, and Alexievich’s well deserved award compounds it, that the academy is looking only at European discussions of literature, weighing everything according to the small literary atmosphere on this continent. This strange, blind bias mars my joy about Alexievich’s award. These selections have been so safe, so European-friendly that I’m hesitant to be happy about rumors that László Krasznahorkai, a truly, deeply, excellent writer may win the award. He would be more than deserving, but at this point, the award needs to look at other continents, at other cultures, at other kinds of writers. And by that I don’t mean Haruki Murakami. In lieu of ranting about him, I direct you to this piece written by my good friend Jake Waalk on this blog.

So let’s go on to my picks. There are three groups of picks: Poetry, International Fiction and European Fiction, in this order.

ONE: Poetry  My #1 wish every year is to give it to a poet, being a poet myself and writing a dissertation on poetry. I also think the genre is criminally underrepresented. So in first place is poetry, and the three living poets that I consider most deserving, plus a European option. I used to put Bei Dao on the list (and not just because he’s charming in person), but with an Academy that prefers European mediocrity over Asian excellence, that’s not going to happen. My list of poets tends to be headlined every year by John Ashbery who I consider not only to be an absolutely excellent poet, but whose influence both on American poetry of his time, and on our reading of older poetry is importand and enduring. Another good option, given the circumstances outlined in my introduction, would be the excellent Yusef Komunyakaa. However, if an American poet makes the cut, I would vote, much as last year, for Nathaniel Mackey. Mackey is an African-American poet who has just won the Bollingen Prize, the single most prestigious award for poetry in the US. His work is powerful, experimental, moving and important. He draws from Modernist traditions and from postmodern impulses – but really, at this point, he has become a tradition in himself. Jazz, biography, politics and the limits of poetry are among his topics. There are other influential experimental US poets who are still alive, but few can match Mackey for his mastery of language and his inventiveness in poetry and prose. Mackey would be an excellent and deserving pick. A close/equal second for me is Syrian poet Adonis/Adunis (Adūnīs) whose work, as far as I read it in French, English and German translation, offers poetry that is both lyrical and intellectually acute. He is a politically passionate poet whose sensibilities prevent him from writing bland political pamphlets. What’s more, he is critically important to Arabic poetry as a scholar, teacher and editor. In a region, where weapons often speak louder that words, and words themselves are enlisted to provide ammunition rather than pleasure, Adonis’s work provides both clarity as well as lyrical wellspring of linguistic nourishment. His work in preserving and encouraging a poetic culture in a war torn environment is not just admirable and fantastically accomplished, it is also worth being recognized and highlighted. In a time of religious fights and infights, of interpretations and misinterpretations, his work engages the language of the Qu’ran inventively, critically, beautifully, offering a poetic theology of modern man. A final intriguing option would be Kim Hyesoon. I have read her work in Don Mee Choi’s spectacular English translation, but I don’t read Korean, and can’t really discuss her. I find her poetry of the body, femininity and the frayed modernity intriguing and interesting, but there’s no way I can adequately discuss her. Violence, accuracy, beauty, it’s all there in her work. I have a half-written essay on Hyesoon and Tracy Smith that I am tempted to submit somewhere (interest?). Finally, If they decline to award someone outside of Europe, I can see an award for Tua Forsström being interesting, although I suppose her work isn’t big enough. You can read some of her poems in David McDuff’s translation here. McDuff, by the way, has a blog that you should consider reading if you’re interested in translation and/or Nordic literature.

TWO: International Fiction Meanwhile, the novelist that I most want to win the prize is Ngugi wa Thiong’o. There’s his literary skill. His early novels written in English, as well as the more allegorical Wizard of the Crow and the recent, clear-eyed and powerful memoirs, all of this is written by an excellent writer. He moves between genres, changing techniques and eventually even languages, all with impressive ease. So he’s a very good writer, but he’s also politically significant. As the literary conscience of a tumultuous Kenya, he highlights struggles, the oppressed and shines a light on how his young country deals with history and power. In the course of his literary and cultural activism he was eventually imprisoned for a while by Kenyatta’s successor. After his release he was forced into exile. Yet through all this, he continued, like Adonis, to work with and encourage cultural processes in his home country. Starting with his decision, in the late 1970s, to stop writing in English, instead using Gĩkũyũ and translating his books into English later. He supported and helped create and sustain a native literary culture that used native languages and interrogated political processes in Kenya. A cultural, political and linguistic conscience of his home country, it’s hard to come up with a living writer who better fits the demands of the academy. Of the writers I root for, this one is the only one who would also fit the “obvious choice” pattern of recent decisions. Wilson Harris, who I mentioned in my introduction, is a better writer in my opinion, but would be more of a stretch for the academy.

THREE: European Fiction So the third pick I am least sure. If a white/European novelist were to win it, after all, who would I be least upset about? Juan Goytisolo appears to be worthy, but I haven’t read his work enough to have an opinion worth sharing. Similarly, due to accessibility problems, I have only read parts of the work of Gerald Murnane who is unbelievably, immensely great. But older parts of his work are out of print, and newer parts have not been published outside of Australia yet. First book, no, first page of his I read I could not believe how good he is, but, again, mostly not been able to read him. Knausgaard, maybe, who has had an extended moment in literary circles? But another dark European writer of memory and language? It would make the scope of the Nobel prize even more narrow than it already is. The enigmatic Elena Ferrante is an option, despite the slimness of her work, but her anonymous nature may keep the academy from awarding her. Scuttlebutt has it that Pynchon’s faceless authorship is what kept one of last century’s best novelists from winning the award. Mircea Cărtărescu is maybe still a bit too young, and his oeuvre is too uneven. His massive new novel may turn the tide, but it hasn’t been translated yet into Swedish, English or French. There are three German language options in my opinion, but the two headliners of Peter Handke and Reinhard Jirgl are both politically dubious. So let me pick two books, no excuses. One is the third of the German options, Marcel Beyer. In a time when right wing politicians and parties are sweeping Europe, Beyer’s clear and sharp sense of history, writing from the country that has brought catastrophe to Europe twice in one century, is very welcome and important. His fiction is infused with a passionate reckoning with the wayward forces of history, a work struggling with the complexities of knowledge and narrative. On top of that, he has developed a style that is always clear yet powerful. No two novels of his are truly alike except in the most broad of parameters and his poetry is still different. German literary fiction about German history, when it’s not written by Jirgl, is often either clichéd (Erpenbeck), sentimental (Tellkamp) or dour (Ruge). There’s really no writer like Marcel Beyer in this country, and that’s been true and obvious for a long time. His work is widely translated. And then there’s László Krasznahorkai who is pretty much universally recognized for his excellence. He draws on an (Austro-)Hungarian tradition of paranoia and darkness, but spins it into an intellectually brilliant and musically devastating form that nobody else can achieve right now.  His work is so unique, so incredibly excellent, such a pinnacle of literary achievement that it transcends any representational caveats.

Other picks & speculation in The Birdcage.

Marcel Beyer wins award

büchnerMarcel Beyer, one of Germany’s 5 best poets, one of Germany’s 5 best novelists and a damn good nonfiction writer, has just won the Büchnerpreis, Germany’s most prestigious lifetime achievement award. I mean he should have won it a decade ago, especially if you look at some past winners (Arnold Stadler, Sibylle Lewitscharoff, FC Delius and Martin Mosebach all number among past winners of the award), but this is well deserved to say the least. All of his fiction has been translated into English, and it is uniformly excellent. I’ll try to have something new on him up one of these days but in the meantime, I’m a bit perturbed that the only thing on my blog I can link to is my very bad review of his very good novel Kaltenburg. I feel it should be mentioned again for readers who only know his novels that Beyer has always written poetry as well as fiction and he is one of the very very few writers who excel at both. I have read (despite not owning) his last collection multiple times and the constant excellence of Beyer’s writing through the years that never flagged, never got bad or complacent, is just stunning. His fiction is infused with a passionate reckoning with the wayward forces of history, a work struggling with the complexities of knowledge and narrative. On top of that, he has developed a style that is always clear yet powerful. No two novels of his are truly alike except in the most broad of parameters and his poetry is still different. German literary fiction about German history, when it’s not written by Jirgl, is often either clichéd (Erpenbeck), sentimental (Tellkamp) or dour (Ruge). There’s really no writer like Marcel Beyer in this country, and that’s been true and obvious for a long time. This recognition by the German Academy for Language and Literature is long overdue.

Thank you Mr. Setz

Due to the size of my audience and my irregular posting times I don’t get a ton of review copies (last one I got was the new Gila Lustiger novel, read my review here). This arrived last week and it’s lovely. Review forthcoming (after I finish my reread of Die Frequenzen, meanwhile here is my review of his debut):setz2setz1

Günter Grass (1927-2015)

grass buttThere are very few writers in recent decades that have had such a rapid decline in reputation as German titan of letters Günter Grass who died Monday morning. After his death became public earlier this morning, many of my friends, well read students, writers and academics, didn’t manage more than a shrug in reaction to the news of Grass’ death. Grass’ career, since winning the Nobel Prize in 1999, has been marked by a shift in politics, and significantly worse writing. The first volume of his memoirs, Beim Häuten der Zwiebel is, in my opinion, the only truly excellent piece of writing he had published between 1995 and his death this weekend. The rest of it – subpar poetry, atrocious novels and negligible prose – was often popular, but lagged behind even the worst of his earlier efforts. Yet literary decline alone is not enough of an explanation: for most of his literary career, Grass had also been politically active, including active campaigning for the center-left party SPD and its chancellor Willy Brandt. Many of his books bear the marks of a politically active mind. He wasn’t able to keep the politics of his day out of his books, leading to excellent novels like Kopfgeburten or Der Butt, which directly discussed and reflected on elections and policies. However, after winning the Nobel Prize, Grass, never one to eschew populism, increasingly sensed that a certain nationalistic brand of right wing rhetoric had crept into mainstream discussions and had become acceptable in polite company. Like his fellow traveler Martin Walser (not to be confused with Robert Walser, the Swiss genius), Grass played with tropes of nostalgia, nationalism and antisemitism, to an ultimately alarming degree. When he died, the crooked noises of his blaring populist trumpets had drowned out the memory of his much more sublime earlier work, in part because in the minds of many readers, late career Grass reminded them of the populist portions of his earlier work that had always been present. That’s why a shrug and an imprecise sadness was the main reaction among many of my friends and colleagues, despite the death of an enormous writer who was influential not just for German but world literature. Writers like John Irving and Salman Rushdie have acknowledged their debt to Grass’ voluminous oeuvre and among the highly praised writers of today in this country, few are untouched by his influence.

grass gesammeltFor most of my reading life, Günter Grass had been one of my favorite writers. Yet even I had conflicting emotions when I heard the news. despite Grass’ presence in my reading and writing life. Not just Grass the novelist, but also Grass the playwright, and, most importantly, Grass the poet. It’s not as well known or remembered today, but Grass’ first publication in 1956 was a collection of poetry and art, Die Vorzüge der Windhühner. His status as an broadly talented artist came from the place he was in after the ravages of the war. Born in Gdansk, he voluntary enlisted in the army in WWII and later was a member of the Waffen-SS. Contrary to many former soldiers or SS members, Grass (admittedly late, in 2008), was clear about the fact that he was not seduced, that he was a willing, even fanatic participant, but it was an experience that, he also claimed, cured him of all authoritarian impulses for the rest of his life. After the war, he became a stone mason apprentice and more generally an artist. Throughout his life, he had never really stopped being a well rounded artist. He was a painter, sculptor, a poet, a novelist, an essayist and an editor. If you’ve ever seen one of his books on the shelf, whether in German or in translation, the cover picture is one drawn or painted by Grass himself. I keep repeating these things because with Grass, they are not minor details. Grass was an unbelievably talented artist. He was not a novelist who dabbled in other genres or areas. I can’t properly judge his art (not my field of expertise) but I can certainly vouch for his poetry. Throughout his career Grass wrote poems and while his later poetry was never quite as good as his early work (true for many poets), he had kept his gift until the mid-1990s, when it, with his other gifts, slowly left him. I would not be who I am as a poet and writer today without Grass’ early poetry, and its influence was fairly wide spread in German literature generally. His gifts were so lavish that he started to write almost occasional poetry, poetry with lewd or odd subjects, poetry that was incorporated into novels, most notably Der Butt (The Flounder, 1977), which contains poems extolling the practice of going to the toilet as a group activity, among other subjects. I insist on this because writers so profoundly gifted in so many areas are very rare and for many decades, there was good reason to count him among the world’s foremost purveyors of literature.

tin drumIt was Die Blechtrommel (The Tin Drum, 1959), his very first novel that indelibly established his importance and skill. It’s part of the misleadingly called Danzig trilogy as all three of the books are set in Danzig/Gdansk. The term is misleading because, with a few exceptions, most of Grass work is either set in or refers back to Danzig, which is Grass’ Yoknapatawpha County. In her essential study of Grass’ work, Irene Leonard pointed out that “Danzig was a German microcosm. In Danzig, events in the Reich were repeated in slow motion.” Additionally, Grass makes all his characters into members of the petit bourgeois class, Kleinbürger in German, this being the class with the highest density of Nazi supporters. This obsession makes him give background characters, when they reappear in his later works, more petit bourgeous professions than they were said to have when they first appeared. It’s important to know that this shifting of truths is not an exception, it’s the rule in Grass’ work, starting with his debut novel. Grass is almost obnoxious in his insistence that not only are his narrators unreliable, he himself is not a reliable source regarding his own books and he crafted a prose intended to have a life of its own. I can’t speak for translations, but in German, Grass writes exactly the kind of prose that you’d expect from a masterful poet – he is highly attentive to even the most minute elements of his writing. A Grass sentence is instantly recognizable: Grass has a specific way of using objects and adjectives in his sentences, by omitting pronouns, stacking and shifting adjectives. He paraphrases and dismembers official jargon, figures of speech, commonplaces and sources such as Heidegger or Weininger. His fiction was first written by hand, then typed into a typewriter, then typeset by the publisher. In all these stages, it was continuously edited and refined. In Grass’ work, especially in the latter two novels of the Danzig trilogy, we are made to witness a writing that is highly cerebral and attentive, and yet also compulsively readable. It’s a visceral joy to read Grass, and that’s not just connected to his obsession with physicality, whether that’s young Tulla Pokriefke’s thin body or the rich physical multitudes of cooking, eating and crapping in The Flounder.

nuveau roimanGrass’ influences are complex and varied. The most immediate influences are the nouveau roman for their use of surfaces and objects, the great poet Arno Holz (who almost won the 1929 Nobel prize) for his use of adjectives and Alfred Döblin for almost everything else. Döblin combined for Grass (and many other German writers) the influences of European avantgarde like dada or absurdist literature with the impact of Joyce and Dos Passos, all of which is wrapped in a strong dedication to narrative and readability. Other influences on Grass are Swiss classic Gottfried Keller (especially Der Grüne Heinrich), Goethe and a whole array of novelists ranging from Laurence Sterne to Grimmelshausen. From all these influences, Grass learned how to deal with narrators and reliability, how to use objects in order to fragment narratives of reality into episodes or scenes that are then co-determined by the presence of the objects arranged in the scene. Public language, molded into Grass’ syntax, becomes one more objects among many, all of which often ends up overwhelming the stories’ subjects. Grass as the author is intentionally elusive, pushing the text away even from himself. His is a writing heavy with symbols but on close reading, these symbols tend to shift, displace, elude. To an incredulous American interviewer he once said “Symbols are nonsense – when I write about potatoes, I mean potatoes.” At the same time, he was aware and adamant that as the author, he did not have final authority over the text, especially once the book was written and he got rid of his notes. The author as a dubious witness – it’s more than an application of Tristram Shandy to the shambles of post WWII Europe. In the light of his autobiography, it also reflects a profound mistrust of grand narratives. A writer with a social and humanist conscience who is aware that in his youth and young adulthood, he unquestioningly and voluntarily followed and fought for the Nazi regime in general and Hitler more specifically, this kind of writer can end up with a poetics as Grass’: distrustful of narratives and distrustful of himself. Even in Beim Häuten der Zwiebel, doubt creeps in. Characters from the novels are given a voice, sowing doubt in the memoirist’s mind.

grass krebsAll of these things are already present in his first books. Die Blechtrommel is narrated by Oskar Matzerath, a person of stunted growth, who writes down the book from within a sanatorium, a “Heil- und Pflegeanstalt”, the “cloisters of modernity” as Elias Canetti referred to them. According to its internal logic, Oskar wrote the book between 1952 and 1954, the book ending on the eve of his 30th birthday. There are two levels of story, one, Oskar’s life from conception uo to his 28th birthday, the other, the two years in the sanatorium during which Oskar writes down the book. There is no external authority verifying the truth of the events presented – in fact, it’s Grass’ own oeuvre that ends up factchecking his early books, confirming and denying various ostensible facts told us by Oskar. Oskar’s honesty is not the most importanr part. It’s his insistence, his obsession in marshaling the past to come back and give a record of the small and large crimes and sins that happened. The word “sin” is not randomly chosen here: Die Blechtrommel, is a book suffused with a sense of religion, reflecting Grass’s Catholic upbringing. Even more openly religiously influenced is the second book in the trilogy, the novella Katz und Maus (Cat and Mouse, 1961). Numerous studies have shown that Grass carefully crafted the book to fit quite a few German theories of the form (ours is a nation obsessed with the genre of the novella, cf. Hartmut Lange for the probably best living practitioner of the form). For a writer enamored with excess and the fullness of story, this novella is remarkably strict and lean. It’s probably Grass’ most ‘perfect’ book, the one least flawed (we all remember Randall Jarrell’s definition of the novel). It’s an exceptional achievement, and an unbelievable example of an already fantastically good writer rapidly developing and maturing. Katz und Maus tells a story of characters that we’ve already met. One has to imagine the Blechtrommel as opening a fount of stories that are all interconnected and that correct and discuss each other. The crowning achievement of this early work is Hundejahre (Dog Years, 1963), which examines and interrogates guilt and complicity by putting on a virtuoso display of how to employ and undercut various forms of narration. It’s separated into three parts, using multiple kinds of voices, genres and perspectives, hiding and revealing identities, zooming in and out of smaller stories in order to discuss and illuminate the greater stories at length.

grass tänzeI discussed the Danzig trilogy at length for two reasons. One is the importance of its ideas, characters and methods for Grass’s later work that would continue to go back to this well until Im Krebsgang (Crabwalk, 2002), which is almost indistinguishable from parody. The other reason is that these 3 books, as well as the unexpected but excellent Das Treffen in Telgte (The Meeting at Telgte, 1979) are the most likely to endure. They are least shackled to the political events of the day. I don’t mean to say that those four books are Grass’ best work, but they are Grass’ most accessible work for an audience living at least a decade after the books were published. His very next novel after the trilogy, örtlich betäubt (Local Anaesthetic, 1969), published at the height of student protests, questions ideas of revolution and change, using history as a way to make sense of the present, not as a way to look at and interrogate the past. It’s also the first book not to include the writing situation as part of the story, even though its narrative setup is not dissimilar to Katz und Maus. While that one was constructed as an Augustinian confession in a very narrow sense, örtlich betäubt is basically a confession/rant delivered by a patient to his dentist (one is reminded of Peter Brooks’ precise analysis of the culture of confession). The present in question that’s being examined was the tail end of the Kiesinger administration. Long before Merkel, Germany was once, for three years, governed by a coalition of its two largest parties. The chancellor of that coalition was Kurt Georg Kiesinger, a former Nazi party member (who, like Grass, joined with enthusiasm). Other former members of the Nazi party included the foreign minister as well as the economics minister. This may explain the novel’s sense of gloom and doom, especially since Grass, a typical social democrat, did not believe in radical change either (Wer hat uns verraten? Sozialdemokraten!). The next novel, similar in intent, if differently structured, picks up at this point and ends in the election of Willy Brandt, the great hope of Germans center-left intellectuals.

grass brandWith those two novels a new era of Grass novels begins that use not just the past, but also myth and fairy tales in order to examine a political issue of the day, whether that’s feminism (Der Butt / The Flounder), demographics (Kopfgeburten / Headbirths), environmental concerns (Die Rättin / The Rat) or the German reunification (Ein weites Feld / Too Far Afield). They all have their specific strengths and are often powerfully written and elaborately (and cleverly) constructed. They were not, however, as well received by critics, in part because their political content offered critics an easy way to dismiss the books without engaging with their extraordinary literary power. It’s not until 2002 that Grass scored another major success with both critics and audience. That book was Im Krebsgang (Crabwalk). Now, by 2002, Grass work did not have the same potency as it had even 1995. His collection of short prose, Mein Jahrhundert (My Century, 1999) was uncharacteristically flat, by then, he hadn’t published a new book of poetry since 1993. Im Krebsgang was short, hurried and flat – it turned out that Grass’ high octane style didn’t work when it wasn’t powered by a writer working at the top of his game. It seemed -as I mentioned- like a lazy parody. It’s success -somewhat analogous to the lack of success of the earlier books – was due to politics. In 2002 another important and popular, if deplorable, book was published: Der Brand by actor and historian Jörg Friedrich. In it, Friedrich goes on at length about the hardships of the German populace during the Allied bombing, producing a heated amalgam of facts, fiction and some terrible turns of phrases (like “the bomb holocaust”). Grass’ novel about a German civilian ship, sunk by a Soviet submarine in the last weeks of the war perfectly fit the sudden craving in Germany of narratives of German victims. Starting roughly in 1999, a subtle (though increasingly less so) historical revisionism had created this need for counter narratives that emphasized German victims. Apart from the very good first volume of his autobiography Beim Häuten der Zwiebel (Peeling the Onion, 2006), the rest of his work published in the oughts was similarly bad. His collection of poetry Letzte Tänze wasn’t even a parody any more. It’s just a mostly inconsequential book of newfound righteousness and old man horniness. The nadir, finally, of Grass’ literary production was his poem “Was Gesagt Werden Muss” (“What has to be said”), a poem about Israel that is full of modern antisemitic rhetoric.

grass grimmThe young Grass used to take these phrases and twist them into art and truth. Old Grass just regurgitates right wing rhetoric. In the years between Im Krebsgang and the new “poem”, he had given numerous ill informed interviews. Famously, he invented the fact that 6 millions of German soldiers had died in soviet camps, a number clearly intended to balance the 6 million Jews Germans had murdered. His use of German myth and tradition in connection with present day concerns in his last volume of autobiography Grimms Wörter (no translation yet, 2010) suddenly didn’t seem smart and literate any more as it was in the 70s and 80s and more reminiscent of right wing nationalist nostalgia. As his work and reputations slowly disintegrated Grass pressed on, gave interviews, published more individual poems. More, more. Despite his misguided politics in the last decade of his life and his waning literary skills, he was still animated by an urge to say something, to contribute something, to do something. For me, there’s nothing worse than a writer without obsessions and urges. Günter Grass had both in spades and the best of his work ranks with some of the best literature published in the last century. It’s tempting to judge him in the light of his poor last decade. As someone who has been reading Grass for 20 years, who has read all of his books, most of them multiple times, I don’t want to do that. Today we mourn the passing of a Great Writer. Mourn with me. They don’t come along very often.

*

As always, if you feel like supporting this blog, there is a “Donate” button on the left and this link RIGHT HERE. 🙂 If you liked this, tell me. If you hated it, even better. Send me comments, requests or suggestions either below or via email (cf. my About page) or to my twitter.) (ISBN)

Es wird nichts geheilt.

Mich wundert, daß er das Haus will. Diesen Ort, als wäre es ein noch unberührter Ort, der zu seiner Geschichte gehört. Als wäre das Alter und die Traurigkeit dorthin nicht vorgedrungen. Die Traurigkeit und das Entsetzen, daß es keinen Ort gibt, der unberührt geblieben ist, von der Wahrheit, der Kälte. […] Wir Juristen sind rückwirkend immer Historiker einer als gerecht gedachten Geschichte, einer Rechtlichkeit, die objektiv ist. […] Wenn es schon den Engel der Geschichte nicht gibt, nicht wahr, dann muß doch wenigstens etwas anderes zuverlässig sein. Gut, das finde ich auch. Aber warum kann es nicht der schiere Gegenwert von etwas sein? Warum auf dem bestehen, was verloren ist, warum darauf, daß etwas geheilt wird? Es wird nichts geheilt.

aus Katharina Hackers Roman Die Habenichtse

Neuerscheinung

Georg Klauda von lysis hat eine neue Veröffentlichung, die deliziös klingt:

Islamische Staaten geraten durch die Verfolgung Homosexueller immer wieder in den Blickpunkt der westlichen Medien, die solche Vorfälle gern als Zeichen kultureller Rückständigkeit interpretieren. Einige Bundesländer schlugen deshalb vor, Muslime im Einbürgerungsverfahren nach ihrer Einstellung zu Homosexuellen zu befragen. Zeigen sich deklassierte Halbstarke aus Migrantenfamilien aggressiv gegenüber Schwulen, werden reflexhaft religiöse Motive unterstellt.Dabei beschworen Homosexuelle die Kultur des Orient noch zu Beginn des 20. Jahrhunderts als ein tolerantes Gegenbeispiel zu den Jahrhunderten religiöser und säkularer Verfolgung in Europa. Die klassische arabische Liebeslyrik z.B. ist voll von gleichgeschlechtlichen Motiven, die man in der Literatur des aufgeklärten Abendlands vergeblich sucht. Man mag kaum glauben, dass sich die Lebensweise in islamischen Gesellschaften in einer so kurzen Zeitspanne auf so einschneidende Weise geändert haben soll.
Doch gerade diejenigen, die mit dem Finger auf die Homophobie der islamischen Welt zeigen, gehen jeder Erklärung dieses Wandels aus dem Weg.Anhand zahlreicher historischer und aktueller Quellen belegt der Autor, dass die Schwulenverfolgung in Ländern wie Iran und Ägypten weniger das Relikt einer vormodernen Vergangenheit ist. Vielmehr handelt es sich um das Resultat einer gewaltsamen Angleichung an die Denkformen ihrer ehemaligen Kolonialherren, die Homosexuelle im Prozess der Modernisierung erstmals identifiziert, benannt und zum Objekt staatlichen Handelns gemacht haben. Homophobie ist eine Erfindung des christlichen Westens, die im Zuge der Globalisierung in die entlegensten Winkel dieser Welt exportiert wird.

"Senile Selbstbefriedigung": Kertész über Kunst

Der wunderbare Imre Kertész:

Wäre es das, was die Literaten “Begabung” nennen? Ich glaube kaum. Mit keiner meiner Taten, Worte, Äußerungen habe ich je ein Zeichen irgendeiner Begabung oder Originalität gegeben – allenfalls damit, daß ich am Leben blieb. Ich habe mich nicht in erfundene Geschichten hineingeträumt; ich mußte nicht einmal etwas mit dem anzufangen, was mir widerfuhr. Die erlösende Stimme der Berufung drank kein einziges Mal an mein Ohr, die Summe meiner Erfahrungen konnte nur meine Überflüssigkeit bestätigen, nie meine Wichtigkeit. Das erlösende Wort war mir nicht zu eigen; Vollkommenheit hat mich nicht interessiert, und auch nicht Schönheit, von der ich nicht einmal weiß, was das ist. Den Gedanken an Ruhm halte ich für senile Selbstbefriedigung, den an Unsterblichkeit einfach für lächerlich.

– Imre Kertész, Fiasko (trans. György Buda)

Philisterei

Bah:

Die deutsche Ausgabe allerdings basiert auf der englischen Übertragung und ist also das Resultat einer doppelten Übersetzung. Beide Male habe der Text etwas verloren, beim ersten Mal das “Düstere” und die “existenzielle Angst” des indischen Originals, beim zweiten Mal ein paar “kulturspezifische Nuancen”, die in der englischen Übertragung wohl noch mitschwangen. Wenner stört das alles nicht sehr, da sich die Übersetzung von Ursula Gräfe “wunderbarer” als die englische Grundlage lese, und die Rezensentin fühlt sich bei den geglätteten Sätzen und dem “gehobenen” Ton an Novalis und seinen Heinrich von Ofterdingen erinnert.

Kein Wunder, daß deutsche Übersetzungen so furchtbar sind, wenn das der Anspruch ist. Wort- und Kulturkannibalismus. Die Pest. Bah.

*

On hopes, disappointments and surprises: recent books by Günter Grass and Salman Rushdie

Salman Rushdie and Günter Grass, two of my favorite living writers, have both published new books recently. Both writers have a mixed track record of late. Rushdie took a downward turn with The Ground Beneath Her Feet and hit literary rock bottom with the astonishingly bad Fury. He regained some ground since, with the mixed but good Shalimar the Clown. It wasn’t all good, in retrospect there were many problems with it but I for one heaved a big sigh of relief upon reading it. Especially the Kashmir passages were among his very best work, and in the WWII passages I felt he was slowly getting the hang of writing about the west without descending into self-parody.

Grass has started his bad years with Mein Jahrhundert (My Century), which showcased why he shouldn’t write more short prose, but wasn’t as excruciatingly bad as the poetry he published in the following years. Novemberland and Letzte Tänze were bad. Very bad. Embarrassingly bad. Lord knows, Grass was one of the best German post-WWII poets when he started his career, I’d still recommend his debut volume of poetry, Die Vorzüge der Windhühner to anyone who cares for poetry and my opinion. I can’t really explain what happened. He also published a novel that read like a bad parody of himself, Im Krebsgang (Crabwalk).

So I awaited both writers’ new books with hopes and fears. With Grass, admittedly, the hope was solely based on my love for his older work and wasn’t strong enough to make me pay for the hardcover. When I finally bought the paperback of Beim Häuten der Zwiebel (Peeling the Onion) I was pleasantly surprised. Yes, some irritating ticks, too much talk of Grass’ penis and too much of a hurry marred the book, but it cohered wonderfully, was a great read and contained much of what I loved and love in Grass’ work. A shifty memoirist, he slips in and out of truth, offers interpretations for his own work by claiming real life counterparts to some of his most famous creatures, including the precocious son of an acquaintance of his, who walks into the living room with his tin drum. Grass relates of his talks with a friend in the army, who was to become Pope Benedikt XVI, he does a good job of discussing Germany’s dark past without providing excuses (but also without being really open about it, more on this soon) and his writing often shines as it did in the old days. It’s the old baroque Grass again, who lays it on too thickly but it feels rarely forced. An inspired book.

Not so The Enchantress of Florence. Well. There are two ways of looking at the book. They are not compatible, but they are both true. According to one it’s easily his best work since The Moor’s last Sigh. No matter how you look at it, it’s not as good as Moor or the Verses, or Shame, or Children, or indeed Haroun, but it bests the rest of his novels. There is some glorious writing and there are few writers out there who can do as much justice to the sumptuousness of the setting of the novel as Rushdie can. Without even having to indulge in long descriptions, it’s there, in his prose. He needs few words to paint a whole, finely detailed, rich world. Days after finishing the Enchantress I had vivid visions of Florence. It made me pull Mandragola and The Prince off shelves and reread them.

There are many strange and great characters, often pained with broad brushstrokes that left an intricate pattern in the novel. The story is straightforward enough told with an enormous pace, actually, but without ever seeming hurried. He seems to have regained his talent for telling a rich story in few words, something which has amazed me ever since Shame (which, at the time, I picked up reluctantly, as any thin book, but which, in retrospect, seems like that house in Danielewski’s House of Leaves, it’s bigger inside than outside.)

However, there are, once we invoke the masterpieces of this great writer, some respects in which The Enchantress somewhat short. It’s never as moving, as warm, as his earlier work. People move past you and even though their characterization is superb, the book is still cold. With a writer of Rushdie’s abilities, I wouldn’t be surprised if he had recognized his strengths and crafted a better novel, to the best of his abilities. Unlike Beim Häuten der Zwiebel (Peeling the Onion) this is most certainly not an inspired book, no sir. It’s a supremely well crafted book, but there’s something missing at the heart of it all, although I admit that Rushdie’s language does carry a certain warmth, the warmth of a room hung with thick, rich carpets, in the midst of summer, in a household lonely with cruelty. The child alone in his room basks in the heat, but still shivers, from a different kind of cold.

And this is where we turn to the second point I alluded to before. Rushdie was never a good thinker. Take a peek into one of his volumes of essays and you’ll see what I mean. The best parts of them are inspiring, even thought provoking, but less like real philosophy and more like (at times) good aphorisms. Not that they are aphorisms. If that is confusing, it’s all you’re going to get. Well. Back to Rushdie being a second- or third-rate thinker.

It shows in the new novel which cites and sometimes paraphrases contemporary discussions of that infamous idea of the “Clash of Cultures” and of religion and fundamentalism. Tired, all too well known witticisms, bad arguments that pose in the novel as novel (excuse the pun) ideas, and brilliant and/or daring ones at that. How could Rushdie have read period pieces (it is to be assumed he has read all or most of Macchiavelli’s work, including the luminous work that is the Discourses on Livy) and assumed that his cut&paste method of transplanting weak contemporary arguments into that setting could work at all?

Hence my comparison to Fury. Both are, in their own ways, failed novels of ideas, in both cases because Rushdie hasn’t many good ideas, in the philosophical sense, of his own. It’s not just because Rushdie is channeling the Football Hooligans of Rational Thought, although he is, and it’s not a nice thing to behold. No, this novel immediately takes a nosedive anytime he engages in anything philosophical. It recovers quickly, but I have been known to shout angrily from time to time while reading it. I’m not sure I want to reread it. I’ll try to just remember the great parts and look forward to the new novel, which is, hopefully, emptier of philosophy and fuller of awesome (yes, I use awesome as a noun). ISBN

Emanzipation

Zwei Zitate aus Leben und Abenteuer der Trobadora Beatriz nach Zeugnissen ihrer Spielfrau Laura von Irmtraud Morgner

Der Soldat vergaß nicht zu erwähnen, daß Manöver und Rüstung entbehrlich wären, sobald die Ausbeutung des Menschen durch den Menschen in allen Ländern abgeschafft wäre. “Und die Ausbeutung der Frau durch den Menschen.” sagte Beatriz. “Wie”, sagte der Soldat. Sein Unverständnis erklärte sich Beatriz mit den idealen Zuständen seiner Heimat.

*

Als neulich unsere Frauenbrigade im Espresso am Alex Kapuziner trank, betrat ein Mann das Etablissement, der meinen Augen wohltat. Ich pfiff also eine Tonleiter rauf und runter und sah mir den Herrn an, auch rauf und runter. Als er an unserem Tisch vorbeiging, sagte ich “Donnerwetter”. Dann unterhielt sich unsere Brigade über seine Füße, denen Socken fehlten, den taillenumfang schätzten wir auf siebzig, Alter auf zweiunddreißig […] Wegen schlechter Haltung der schönen Schultern riet ich zu Rudersport. Da der Herr in der Ecke des Lokals Platz genommen hattem mußten wir sehr laut sprechen. Ich ließ ihm und mir einen doppelten Wodka servieren und prostete ihn zu, als er der Bedienung ein Versehen anlasten wollte. Später ging ich zu seinem Tisch, entschuldigte mich, sagtem daß wir uns von irgendwoher kennen müßten, und besetzte den nächsten Stuhl. Ich nötigte dem Herrn die Getränkekarte auf und fragte nach seinen Wünschen. Da er keine hatte, drückte ich meine Knie gegen seine, bestellte drei Lagen Sliwowitz und drohte mit vergeltung für den Beleidigungsfall, der einträte, wenn er nicht tränke. Obwohl der Herr weder dankbar noch kurzweilig war, sondern wortlos, bezahlte ich alles und begleitete ihn aus dem Lokal. In der Tür ließ ich meine Hand wie zufällig über seine Hinterbacke gleiten, um zu prüfen, ob die Gewebestruktur in Ordnung wäre. Da ich keine Mängel feststellen konnte, fragte ich den Herrn, ob er heute abend etwas vorhätte, und lud ihn ein ins Kino. Eine innere Anstrengung, die zunehmend sein hübsches gesicht zeichnete, verzerrte es jetzt grimassenhaft, konnte die Verblüffung aber endlich lösen und die Zunge, also daß der Herr sprach: “Hören Sie mal, Sie haben ja unerhörte Umgangsformen.” “Gewöhnliche”, antwortete ich, “Sie sind nur nichts Gutes gewöhnt, weil Sie keine Dame sind.”

Pilgern

Der Pilger sollte ausreichend Geld für seine Familie hinterlassen, und keine Schulden; selbst wenn sein Nachbar Not leidet, sagt ein Hadith, muß er die Reise aufschieben. […] Am wichtigsten aber ist, daß der Gläubige sich vorab von seinen Lastern und Schwächen befreit. Die Hadsch wird ihn zwar von allen Sünden reinigen, aber sie wird nicht einen besseren Menschen aus ihm machen. Wer als Lügner oder Heuchler aufbricht, wird als Lügner oder Heuchler heimkehren. Die Hadsch ist kein Selbstzweck, sie wirkt nicht an sich.

aus Ilija Trojanows Büchlein “Zu den heiligen Quellen des Islam: Als Pilger nach Mekka und Medina” Malik, 2004.

Vom Lesen

Ich esse Bücher. Wenn Bücher die Missionare der Vernunft und Kreativität sind (Ich gebe zu, “Missionare” und “Vernunft” in ein und demselben Satz beißt sich), dann bin ich der kraushaarige Wilde, der sie auffrisst. Ich verschlinge sie hastig, gierig, während der reichen Mahlzeit die Augen bereits nach dem nächsten auswerfend.

Ich lese viel und mit einer Gier, die dem hehren Medium “Buch”, das eigentlich eine entschleunigende Funktion in der modernen Gesellschaft erfüllen könnte, im Grunde schlecht bekommt. Ich lese mehrere Bücher parallel und trotzdem fällt mein Auge ab und zu auf ein ausgelesenes Buch im Regal und prompt falle ich auch über dieses her. Neue Bücher sind ohnehin sofort dran. Das führt zu der Situation, daß ich, trotz hohen Lesepensums, zu wenigstens einem viertel angelesene Bücher in den Regalen habe. Ich habe keinerlei ungelesene Bücher, aber mehrere dutzend angelesene. Im Moment versuche ich mich zwar von Neukäufen abzuhalten und endlich ein paar Bücher zu Ende zu lesen, aber das ist nicht gerade leicht, meine Freunde.

Ich verschandele Bücher. Gier ist ein schlechter Begleiter behutsamen Lesens. Ich bin zwar bibliophil bis (fast) zum Fetisch, meine Bücher haben kaum äußere Schäden, Knicke zum beispiel, dafür sind sie aber im Inneren gezeichnet durch dutzende Eselsohren. Eine Zeitlang wollte ich dem Beispiel einer guten Bekannten folgen und Zitate herausschreiben und archivieren, aber das dafür notwendige Innehalten im Lesen ist mir unerträglich. Also pflüge ich weiter durch die Bücher wie der ausgehungerte Wilde der ich bin.

Ich fresse Bücher und mit der Zeit entwickelt man einen feinen Gaumen, aber, seien wir ehrlich: ein echter Leser ist immer auch ein Schwein. Er frißt alles. Das heißt nicht, daß er unterschiedslos schlechte und gute Bücher liest, aber durchaus, daß er durcheinander hohe Literatur und das, was sich manchmal abwertend “Trivialliteratur” bezeichnen lassen muß, völlig zu Unrecht, und was ich Genreliteratur nenne. Sicher, auch dieser Begriff, will er hilfreich sein, impliziert eine Abwertung, aber besser wird es nicht. Ich lese nicht nur Kriminalromane, das wohl literarischste Genre, das auch elitäre Handkegenießer (Ich finde Handke fantastisch, aber darum geht es ja nicht) guten Gewissens lesen. Ich verschlinge Berge an Fantasy, historischen Romanen, Science Fiction, Horror. In den letzten Jahren zwar weniger als noch vor 5 Jahren, aber immer noch habe ich im aktuellen Lesestapel mindestens ein Genrebuch (in diesem Augenblick ist es Laura Lippman’s toller Roman “What the Dead know”). Ich finde, daß ‘trivial’ der falsche Begriff dafür ist. Sicher gibt es schlechte Bücher in der Genreliteratur, aber die gibt es auch in sogenannter Hochliteratur. Die wilde Freude am Fabulieren, die herausgeschrieene Lust am Erzählen und Erfinden ist in der Genreliteratur oft frischer und lebendiger, als in der zuweilen etwas müde wirkenden Hochkultur. Jedes Buch, und zwar jedes, kann einem denkenden Menschen, und daß das Denken beim Lesen wichtig ist, daß passives Lesen eine Verschwendung an Zeit und Buch ist, ist ohnehin klar, den Horizont erweitern. Trivial ist nur ein passiv aufgenommenes Buch, und das kann Beckett ebenso wie Stephen King sein.

Ich bin ein allesfressender Vielfraß, aber das ist nicht schlimm. Schlimm ist, daß meine Augen größer sind als mein Magen. So viele saftige Bücher und eine vergleichsweise winzige Menge an Zeit, um sie sich einzuverleiben. Heute habe ich mir die große neue P&V Übersetzung von Krieg und Frieden bestellt und zwei Biographien von Ackroyd, sowie die Tagebücher von Schlesinger, ohne eine Idee davon, wann ich diese 4000+ Seiten lesen will. Je mehr man liest, umso mehr wird einem bewußt, daß es noch unzählbare Mengen an Büchern gibt, die man noch nicht gelesen hat.

Und es kommt einem auch ein bißchen die eigene Meinung abhanden, die ich nur noch rhetorisch formulieren kann, fast alles was ich schreibe, ist dem Vorredner geschuldet, als Reaktion, denn je mehr man liest, umso schneller fällt einem auf, daß alles immer komplizierter ist, als man auf die Schnelle erklären kann. Auf jedes kurze Statement, so gut es auch ist, muß man eigentlich immer antworten: ‘ja, aber…’. Insofern ist eine eigene Meinung, die keine Reaktion ist, immer eine ungeheure Unverfrorenheit, eine wilde Ungeheuerlichkeit, an der man sich nicht versucht, weil sie einen bei den anderen Dampfplauderern immer ärgert und ist doch schon immer ein Dampfplauderer. Also liest man weiter, ohne all das Gelesene angemessen schöpferisch zu verarbeiten, um es ablegen zu können, man liest weiter und frißt sich immer mehr Material an und keine Diät der Welt hilft dem gierigen Leser da weiter.

Und dann sitzt man da, aufgebläht mit Büchern, Worten, Wissen, Figuren und hundertfachem Leben, und weiß doch nur, daß es immer und immer weiter geht, weiter, hinaus in die welt und in die Bücher, ich, die gefräßige Lesesau, der aufgedunsene Wilde mit dem Kraushaar und dem Herz voll Buchstaben.

Lustige Bücher kann man nie genug haben

Weltoktober, von Thorsten Mann.

Der Name Michail Gorbatschows ist bis heute mit dem Ende des “real existierenden Sozialismus” verbunden. In den 1980er Jahren wurde von ihm unter dem Begriff der “Perestroika” ein Prozess eingeleitet, der zur Auflösung der Sowjetunion, des Warschauer Paktes und zur deutschen Wiedervereinigung führte. Dieser Prozess verlief zum Erstaunen vieler Analysten relativ friedlich, nur wenige Beobachter stellten die Frage nach dem Warum. Fiel die Berliner Mauer auf Veranlassung des KGB? Gibt es einen Zusammenhang mit dem Aufbau der Europäischen Union, die immer sozialistischere Züge trägt? Welche geheimen Interessen verfolgte Gorbatschow wirklich? Ist der Kommunismus wirklich tot oder steht die Welt im Zuge der Globalisierung unmittelbar vor dem Zusammenbruch der kapitalistischen Weltwirtschaft? Wird dies zu einem Wiedererstarken der marxistischen Ideologie führen, gefolgt von einer neuen Oktober-Revolution, dem Weltoktober?

Torsten Mann zeigt, dass der Zerfall der Sowjetunion und ihrer Satellitenstaaten sowie der Übergang zu marktwirtschaftlichen Verhältnissen nur eine raffiniert inszenierte Täuschung war, eine Täuschung, die dem Ziel dient, eine seit Lenins Zeiten bestehende geheime flexible Langzeitstrategie umzusetzen, zur Errichtung einer sozialistischen Neuen Weltordnung.

Ich bin schon wieder vom Stuhl gefallen vor Lachen. Erst Broder mit seiner ganz speziellen Theorie der Islamphobie und nun das. Ich sollte den Wippermann anrufen.

via classless kulla

Wissenschaftlichkeit der Literaturwissenschaft nach Peter Szondi

Ist Literaturwissenschaft wirklich eine Wissenschaft, im gleichen Sinne, wie die Naturwissenschaften es sind, oder sollte man dem Habitus des Englischen folgen, das nur von literary criticism redet, also von Literaturkritik, und das wissenschaftliche Moment der Literaturwissenschaft als reine begriffliche Fehlschöpfung und im Prinzip nicht vorhanden betrachten? Die Antwort auf diese Frage ist eng mit der speziellen Art der Erkenntnis der Literaturwissenschaft verknüpft, der philologischen Erkenntnis, die für den Unterschied zwischen ihr und den Naturwissenschaften verantwortlich ist.

Peter Szondi sieht in seinem Traktat über die philologische Erkenntnis diese im Einklang mit Schleiermachers Forderung nach einer Hermeneutik „für ein vollkommenes Verstehen einer Schrift“ (263) als „bloßes Textverständnis“ (263) an.
Dabei mag das Wort „bloß“ falsch gewählt sein, ist das Textverständnis doch nachgerade keine simple Tätigkeit, vielmehr ist es so, dass das Textverständnis die einzige Aufgabe der philologischen Erkenntnis ist, die nicht in Gebieten ihrer Schwester, der natur-wissenschaftlichen Erkenntnis wildern sollte, des logischen Deduzierens aus Beweisen.

Anders als in den Naturwissenschaften darf philologisches Wissen nie „Wissen“ im naturwissenschaftlichen und im landläufigen Sinn, also aufgeschriebenes, auswertbares und als Beweis heranzuziehendes Wissen werden.
Philologische Erkenntnis kann sich nicht auf ein statisches, griffbereites Wissen verlassen, im Gegenteil, der Prozess des philologischen Erkennens setzt eine Bewegung der gegenseitigen Abhängigkeiten voraus. Philologisches Wissen ist nämlich dynamisch, es muss immer wieder auf Erkenntnis zurückgeführt werden und durch Erkenntnis geprüft und bestätigt oder verändert werden. Philologisches Wissen kann nur bestehen, indem es immer wieder mit dem Text oder dem Kunstwerk konfrontiert wird. In dieser Konfrontation muss es immer bereit sein, im Zweifelsfalle einer Revision unterzogen zu werden.

Dieser Text, beziehungsweise: dieses Kunstwerk ist auch immer gegenwärtig, das Buch oder heute auch: den geposteten oder gespeicherten Text kann ich immer wieder aufschlagen, ausdrucken oder herunterladen, um ihn wieder und wieder zu lesen und so zu einem Verständnis zu gelangen. Auch wenn ein Exemplar des Textes verbrennt oder verloren geht oder vergilbt, gibt es den Text immer noch irgendwo. Die Aufgabe der Literaturwissenschaft ist, ihn zu finden, ihn zu lesen, zu verstehen und schließlich Erkenntnis aus ihm zu gewinnen. Mag es auch ein großer Text der Weltliteratur sein, der schon unzählbare Male Gegenstand philologischer Untersuchungen geworden ist, man hat sich nie völlig an ihm abgearbeitet, man kann nie das Buch schließen und nun das vermeintlich gewonnene und bewiesene Wissen heranziehen als Basis für Erkenntnis.

Sicher kann auch die Literaturwissenschaft nicht verzichten auf Beweise, etwa durch die Lesartenmethode, die das Erschließen des Wort- oder Metaphernsinns meint, unter Berücksichtigung anderer Worte, die in früheren Textfassungen an gleicher Stelle stehen, oder der Parallelstellenmethode, in der sich der Sinn erschließt durch andere Stellen, in denen das gleiche Wort steht, idealerweise im gleichen Zusammenhang.

Oft genug werden die durch diese Methode gewonnenen Indizien wie klare Beweise behandelt, indem die Parallelstellen in einer Fußnote oder einer Anmerkung bekräftigend aufgeführt werden: quod erat demonstrandum. So einfach verhält es sich jedoch nicht.

Diese Belege müssen ihrerseits mindestens so gründlich untersucht werden, wie die eigentlich zu interpretierende Stelle selbst. Was sagt mir denn, dass das wirklich der gleiche Zusammenhang ist? Oder, die Lesartenmethode betreffend: was sagt mir, dass der Dichter nicht zwischen der einen und der anderen Fassung einfach seine Meinung und den Sinn der untersuchten Passage geändert hat und sich aus der Änderung gar keine Konsequenz für die Interpretation ableiten lässt? Gerne wird auch aus einer, durchaus legitimen, Aussage über den allgemeinen Wort- oder Metapherngebrauch des Dichters heraus ein Ausschluss einer Deutungsmöglichkeit begründet.

Jedoch ist diese Art von Verfahren den Naturwissenschaften allein eigen. Eine philologische Untersuchung muss den zu interpretierenden Text als Individuum betrachten und nur aus Erkenntnis, die wiederum nur aus interpretierendem Textverständnis erwachsen kann ihre Interpretation begründen. Sie kann nicht verzichten auf die Belege, schließlich ist es der einzelne Beleg, aus dem sie ihre Erkenntnis schöpft, allerdings ist der philologischen Erkenntnis eine zirkuläre Bewegung eigentümlich, die die Interpretationsnotwendigkeit immer wieder auch auf die Belege ausweitet.

Man darf nicht vergessen: philologische Erkenntnis ergibt sich aus einem Textverständnis, das ein Verstehen des dichterischen Wortes meint und dem Dichter als kreativer Persönlichkeit immer wieder das Recht einräumen muss, sich im Einzelfall eine völlig neue, im Gesamtwerk einmalige Bedeutung für ein gegebenes Wort oder eine Metapher zu überlegen. Das heißt aber nicht, dass der Interpret abhängig wäre von einem „divinatorischen Funken“, wie manche Schleiermacheradepten es vielleicht fordern würden.
Im Gegenteil. Das „Verständnis“ ist ja kein „Dichterverständnis“, wie man Verständnis für eine Person haben kann, sich einfühlen kann in ihre Gedanken- und Gefühlswelt, um Verständnis für eine ihrer Handlungen zu haben. Richtig heißt es ja Textverständnis, also ein Verständnis, das aus einleuchtenden Gründen zwar den Dichter als kreative Person respektieren, das jedoch die philologische Erkenntnis auf den Text zurückführen muss und nur auf den Text.

Die angebliche Autorintention kann sogar eine Krücke für die Interpretation sein, dann nämlich, wenn sie zum Vorwand genommen wird, eine Eindeutigkeit bei einer bestimmten Metapher oder einem bestimmten Wort festzustellen und die objektiv vorhandene Mehrdeutigkeit des Wortes einfach übergeht. Die Textbelege sind zwar subjektiv und müssen auch wahrgenommen werden als subjektiv vermittelte, darin aber liegt ihre Objektivität, die einzige, die ihnen möglich ist.
Ein Text kann nicht untersucht werden auf einen ihm einfach unterstellten Sinn hin, ein Text muss befragt werden und die Erkenntnis muss dieses Fragen und die Antwort wiederspiegeln, die der Text gibt, in ihrer –womöglich- Unentschiedenheit und der ihm eigenen Färbung und Sprache. Die Erkenntnis kann nicht für sich stehen, der Text ist ihr stets komplementär.

In dieser Interdependenz muss sich die Erkenntnis an einem einzigen Kriterium messen lassen: der Evidenz, die keineswegs das gleiche ist wie ein naturwissenschaftlicher Beweis.
An dem Unterschied zwischen Evidenz und Beweis ist die Natur der ganzen Literaturwissenschaft auszumachen.
Die Literaturwissenschaft ist schlecht benannt. Durch den Begriff „Wissenschaft“ wird suggeriert, dass es hier, wie in anderen Wissenschaften um das Wissen geht, während die Literaturwissenschaft auf philologischer Erkenntnis aufbaut, die ihrerseits nicht von einem „Wissen“ im landläufigen Sinn abhängig sein darf. Kann es also Literaturwissenschaft geben? Oder handelt es sich nur um eine unwissenschaftliche Methode, wenn von philologischer Erkenntnis die Rede ist?

Bei genauerem Hinsehen aber ist die Wissenschaftlichkeit doch, strenggenommen, nicht abhängig von einer bestimmten Methode. Naturwissenschaften haben ihre Methode doch dem Gegenstand ihrer Erkenntnis angepasst: anders kann man Biologie, Chemie oder Physik nicht betreiben, als über Deduktion. Ebenso hat die Literaturwissenschaft ihre Methode ihrem Gegenstand angepasst, darin liegt ihre Wissenschaftlichkeit. Ohne die methodischen Einschränkungen würde sie der Literatur, der Dichtung, ihrem Objekt nicht gerecht, ihre Untersuchungen wären von vornherein mit Fehlern behaftet und sie selbst damit schlicht unwissenschaftlich.

Außerdem wird „wissenschaftlich“ gemeinhin definiert als Vorgehen „nach Forscherart“. Wenn aber der Prozess des Forschens bestimmt ist von einem Vorgang des „Fragens und Suchens“ (267), dann ließe sich schon daraus der nur scheinbar unüberbrückbare Unterschied zwischen den Naturwissenschaften und der Literaturwissenschaft erklären: entscheidend hierbei ist das Motiv des Fragens. Die Literatur als befragtes Objekt der Wissenschaft unterscheidet sich darin grundlegend etwa von den Zahlen, dass ihre Antworten abhängig sind von dem individuellen Text, den man befragt. Bedeutungen sind nicht ohne weiteres auf andere Texte, wie wir bei der Parallelstellenmethode gesehen haben, übertragbar, noch weniger auf Texte anderer Autoren, die zufälligerweise die gleiche Metapher, das gleiche Bild oder nur das gleiche Wort benutzt haben. Die Rose im lyrischen Werk von Paul Celan und im lyrischen Werk von Friedrich Hölderlin tragen andere Konnotationen wenn nicht sogar fundamental andere Bedeutungen. Die 5 jedoch ist immer eine 5, wenn nicht ausdrücklich etwas dazu gesagt wird. Wenn die Interpretation von Literatur evident sein muss, dann muss sie unbedingt auf solche Unterschiede Rücksicht nehmen, ebenso wie auf explizite und implizite Bedeutung.

In der Mathematik ist jede Bedeutung explizit, Änderungen der Bedeutung werden angezeigt, durch hochgestellte Zahlen, Klammern oder andere Zeichen im Umfeld der Zahl. Die Änderungen in literarischen Texten sind meistens jedoch implizit und selbst wenn es explizite Verweise gibt, etwa in poetologischen Texten, dürfen sie nicht bei ihrem Wortlaut genommen werden sondern müssen wie alle literaturwissenschaftlichen Belege ihrerseits wiederum interpretiert werden, um als philologische Erkenntnis zugelassen zu werden.

Entscheidend ist nicht die Beweisführung, sondern die Evidenz der Interpretation, sie wird damit zum Wissenschaftlichkeitsmerkmal der philologischen Erkenntnis. Wenn man die Beweisführung der Mathematik als ihre eigene Spielart der „Legitimation durch Verfahren“ ansieht, einem Begriff der Jurisprudenz, der aussagt, dass etwas schon dadurch legitimiert ist, dass das Verfahren, durch das es zustande gekommen ist, fehlerlos und legitim ist, ein Beweis, der leicht zu führen wäre, könnte man das gleiche für die Literaturwissenschaft einklagen.

Das literaturwissenschaftliche Verfahren ist nämlich nicht beliebiger als das mathematische. Auch hier gibt es ein Urteilen über „richtig“, „falsch“ und die Kategorie der Unentschiedenheit, aber statt in einem logischen Beweis sind literaturwissenschaftliche Urteile begründet in der Evidenz. Dieser Unterschied, wie bereits dargestellt, folgt aus der Natur der Literatur. Philologische Erkenntnis, die aus logischen Verfahren gewonnen wäre, wäre falsch, im gleichen Sinne, wie „2 + 2 = 5“ falsch wäre. 2 + 2 ist fast fünf, der Fehler ist ein relativ kleiner, aber er ist da. Im Vergleich dazu wird der Fehler in logischer Literaturanalyse vermutlich ein grundsätzlich verfälschtes Ergebnis erzielen.

Literaturwissenschaft ist notwendig, als die einzige Wissenschaft, die eine angemessene Untersuchung von Literatur leisten kann, aber ihre Möglichkeit ist abhängig davon, wie sie in Angriff genommen wird. Lediglich wenn sie als Tätigkeit, wie Wittgenstein es von der Philosophie forderte, gesehen wird, kann sie Wissenschaft sein, jedoch nur wenn sie das Wesen ihres Gegenstandes, die Literatur, berücksichtigt und die Konsequenzen, die dieses Wesen für die der Literaturwissenschaft eigene Erkenntnis hat, die philologische Erkenntnis.

Wovon man nicht sprechen kann (Überarbeitet)

Jorge Sempruns Debütroman Le Grand Voyage, schon früh als wichtiger Teil der noch jungen Lagerliteratur erkannt, ist ein Buch, das “modern in der Form, aber bei aller Kompliziertheit doch einfach und verständlich” (Möckel 1059) ist. Seither hat Semprun verschiedene autobiographisch gefärbte Bücher geschrieben. Obwohl sich Le Grand Voyage mit der Shoah beschäftigt, “befaßt sich [Semprun] allerdings nicht speziell mit der Judenfrage” (Möckel 1055), es ist ein Roman, der aus der Perspektive eines Rotspaniers, wie man zur Zeit des Dritten Reichs spanische Mitglieder der Résistance nannte, verfasst ist. Die “Große Reise” des Titels meint eine Zugreise im Viehwagon aus Frankreich ins Konzentrationslager Buchenwald.
Der zentrale erzählerische Trick des Romans ist, daß der Erzähler von dieser Reise 16 Jahre nach der Befreiung von Buchenwald erzählt und in seiner Erzählung Erinnerungen, die zu verschiedenen Zeiten abgerufen werden, intertextuelle Bezüge und politische Anmerkungen vermischt. Es ist aber nicht nur dieses Netz aus Erinnerungen und Literatur, das seinem Shoah-Zeugnis besondere Kraft verleiht, sondern auch die Lücken in dem Netz, zwischen dem Wissen und Erzählen die Unwissenheit und das Schweigen, neben der Erinnerung das Vergessen.
An diesem Punkt setzt die vorliegende Arbeit an. Es wird sich zeigen, daß nicht die Erinnerung der wichtigste Aspekt des Romans ist, soweit es die Shoahverarbeitung betrifft, sondern daß vielmehr das Vergessen und Schweigen die Grenzen und Möglichkeiten von Erinnerung aufzeigt. Dafür wird die Reise als dreistufige Auseinandersetzung mit Erzählen, Erinnern und Schweigen begriffen. Nachdem wir die Erzählkonstellation des Buches und ihrer Verbindung zum Erzählen nach und von Auschwitz, ihre Verbindung zum traumatischen Erzählen, dargestellt haben, wenden wir uns der Erinnerung und der literarischen Auseinandersetzung mit autobiographischer Erinnerung zu. Schließlich werden wir zu der besonderen Form der Erinnerung, die das Zeugnisablegen darstellt, kommen. Zum Schluß werden wir dem Schweigen begegnen, als Nicht-Erzählen ebenso wie als Nicht-Erinnern, und diese zwei Seiten des Schweigens, die in diesem Roman vorgestellt werden, besprechen. Es wird sich zeigen, daß das Schweigen sowohl absolut notwendig ist, als auch überwunden werden muß, soll die Shoah Teil unseres kulturellen Gedächtnisses werden und nicht vielmehr eine obskure Fußnote der Geschichte.

In der Rezeption von Le Grand Voyage wird regelmäßig auf die autobiographische Natur des Romans verwiesen, obwohl es bei genauer Betrachtung von den sogenannten autobiographischen Büchern Sempruns gerade dasjenige ist, das formal betrachtet, zumindest wenn man sich auf Lejeune bezieht, im Grunde der einzige in der Sekundärliteratur herangezogene Theoretiker, gerade nicht autobiographisch ist, “according to the minimal criteria proposed by Philippe Lejeune: the author’s name is identical to the names of the narrator and of the protagonist.” (Suleiman 137). Weder ‘Jorge’ noch ‘Semprun’ kommen im Roman vor, also kommt ein “autobiographischer Pakt” nicht zustande.
Dennoch, da “he used several pseudonyms during his years in the Resistance and in
the Communist Party, Semprun’s names have been multiple” (Suleiman 137). Der “Ich-Erzähler, der innerhalb der Handlung von den französischen Romanfiguren Gérard und von den spanischen Manuel genannt wird” (Küster 43) trägt zwei dieser Namen und außerdem, wie z.B. Küster gezeigt hat, stimmen die Biographien des Ich-Erzählers und die Sempruns “völlig überein” (43). Es wird wohl diese Übereinstimmung sein, die in der Kritik die Auseinandersetzung mit der autobiographischen Hypothese vermissen läßt, es scheint offensichtlich zu sein, daß Le Grand Voyage einen autobiographischen Text darstellt.
Die so verfahrenden Autoren verweisen jedoch recht selten auf die Tatsache, die gerade in ihrem Text- und Autorenverständnis schwer wiegen sollte, daß Semprun in späteren Werken verschiedene Details in früheren Texten in Bezug auf ihren Wahrheitsgehalt korrigiert. Semprun scheint ein unsicherer Kantonist zu sein, was die autobiographische Wahrheit seiner Texte angeht. Dies aber bedeutet, daß die Entscheidung, Romane wie Le Grand Voyage aufgrund von Übereinstimmungen einfach als autobiographisch zu markieren, von einer unsauberen kritischen Methode zeugt .

Schon Paul De Man verweist in seinem Essay “Autobiography as De-facement” (cf. De Man, Rhetoric of Romanticism, 67ff.) auf die methodischen Schwierigkeiten, die bei einer Bestimmung der Autobiographie als Genre, das sich z. B. von der Fiktion oder der Reportage klar unterscheidet, auftreten. Was ich zuvor als ‘autobiographische Hypothese’ bezeichnet habe, begründet de Man mit der “illusion of reference” (69). Gerade aber in Arbeiten, die sich mit der Shoah beschäftigen, sollte die Beziehung zwischen Fiktionen und anderen Illusionen ausreichend geklärt sein, um nicht in die Situation gedrängt zu werden, die Wahrheit der Shoah verteidigen zu müssen, gegen Angriffe, die insinuieren, daß, wer in einem Detail lügt, dies vielleicht auch in anderen, wesentlicheren Details macht.
Im Folgenden wird daher der Roman als ein fiktiver Text behandelt, in dem zwar Zeugnis abgelegt wird, aber nicht Zeugnis vom Schicksal des Schriftstellers Jorge Semprun, sondern vom Schicksal des Rotspaniers Gérard. Alle im weiteren Text auftauchenden Aussagen über Erinnerung, Zeugnis oder Erzählung beziehen sich auf den Erzähler Gérard, nicht auf Semprun.

Das gros des Romans ist in der ersten Person Singular geschrieben, es beschreibt die Zugreise Manuels, eines spanischen Résistancekämpfers der seit seinem Eintritt in eben jene Résistance unter dem Kampfnamen Gérard bekannt ist. Die Geschichte wird sechzehn Jahre nach der Befreiung von Buchenwald von Gérard erzählt, wobei dies nicht die einzige Ebene bleibt, auf der jemandem etwas erzählt wird. Die zentrale Erzählkonstellation des Romans ist in dem Gespräch zu finden, das Gérard mit einem namenlosen Mithäftling im Zug führt, der dem Leser lediglich als ‘gars de Semur’ bekannt ist. Kaplan schlägt vor, den ‘gars de Semur’ als Erfindung zu betrachten, die Gérard in seine Erzählung einführt, “because the memory of taking the gruelling journey alone would have been difficult to reconstruct without an interlocutor” (Kaplan 322). Das Gespräch ist also nicht nur ein erinnertes Gespräch, es erfüllt außerdem noch eine Funktion innerhalb der Erzählstruktur des Romans. Zu dieser Doppelbelegung von wichtigen Ereignissen werden wir jedoch später kommen.
Diese Figur des Zuhörers hat jedoch einen weiteren Vorteil für die Erzählung von Gérard 16 Jahre nach der Befreiung. In Anlehnung an modernistische Prosavorbilder wie Proust und Faulkner, stellt Gérards Erzählung eine Flickenteppich aus Erinnerung und literarischen Anspielungen dar, in dem verschiedene Zeitebenen überlappen. Es ist vorgeschlagen worden, daß ein Erzählen von episodischem Erinnern dann besonders kohärent erscheint, wenn “very personal emotive attitudes, evaluative beliefs and emotional associations of a remembered episode” (Bublitz 378) ins Spiel kommen. Aber dies ist mit einem so außergewöhnlichen Ereignis wie der Shoah nicht leicht zu erreichen. Die Einführung eines ‘echten’ Zuhörers zusätzlich zum impliziten Zuhörer, der sich aus der informellen, mündliche Rede nachahmenden Sprache des Romans ergibt, kann als ein Versuch gelesen werden, eine Ebene der geteilten Erfahrung zu erreichen, indem Gérard dem ‘gars de Semur’ nach und nach alles was ihn in die Situation brachte, in der er nun ist, kleinteilig erklärt.
Damit erklärt er dem ‘gars de Semur’ aber auch das, was gerade passiert, die Zugfahrt ebenso wie die Greuel während und die antizipierten Greuel nach der Fahrt. Im Zusammenhang mit der Traumaforschung ist ein solches Sprechen über schlimme Erfahrungen als positiver Mechanismus bekannt, der dafür Sorgen kann, daß die ‘live’ beschriebene Erfahrung nicht zu einer traumatischen Erinnerung wird (cf. Shabad 201). Diese Konstellation allerdings sorgt auch dafür, daß Buchenwald weitgehend ausgespart bleibt, eine Lücke bildet, denn das Lager, wie sich im Laufe des Romans herausstellt, kann er niemandem mehr erzählen, d.h. verständlich machen. Es ist dann auch das Lager, das den Grundstock seiner traumatischen Erfahrung bildet. Der Erzähler klagt: “Il n’y a plus personne à qui je puisse parler de ce voyage. La solitude de ce voyage va me ronger […] toute ma vie.” (GV 165)

All dies wird mit den erzählerischen Mitteln vollbracht, die Marcel Proust zu einem Bestandteil der Weltliteratur machte . Im folgenden Unterkapitel werden ein paar der literarischen Techniken dargestellt, die zu diesen Mitteln gehören, wie von Gérard Genette in Figures III dargestellt.
So kann das Gespräch mit dem ‘gars de Semur’ und die Reise als Analepsis gesehen werden, jedoch liegt es in der Natur der Darstellung dieses Romans, daß der Leser häufig vergisst, daß es sich bei der jetzt-Ebene keineswegs um die Reise-Ebene handelt, so daß Bezüge ins Jetzt und in die Jahre nach der Befreiung dem Leser als Prolepsis, also als Vorgriff erscheinen. Beide Begriffe kann man unter dem Begriff der Anachronie zusammenfassen (cf. Genette 76-120).

Man muß nicht so weit gehen wie Edwards und Potter und sagen, daß

“reality is not a stable phenomenon that can be used to validate memories but is instead established by memories” (Lebow 12).

Jedoch ist im Roman von Semprun die Wirklichkeit, auf die Gérards
Erzählung rekurriert, nicht zu trennen von literarischen Reminiszenzen und Konstrukten, zu denen, wie oben angeführt, unter Umständen auch der ‘gars de Semur’ gehört. Die Unterscheidung von Wirklichkeit und Erinnerung soll jedoch hier noch nicht geleistet werden, das wird anderorts geschehen. Vielmehr möchte ich an dieser Stelle Erzählung, also literarische Mittel, Konstrukte und ähnliches, abgrenzen von genuiner Erinnerung, verstanden als zunächst einmal unabhängig vom ‘tatsächlichen’ Wahrheitsgehalt in Bezug auf die Welt. Diese Unterscheidung ist schon dann sinnvoll und notwendig, wenn man sich ins Gedächtnis ruft, daß erinnernde Erzählungen, ihren Gegenstand, die autobiographische Erinnerung “modellieren” (Tschuggnall 58). Gerade im Fall von Gérards Erzählung ist angesichts der vielen metonymischen und symbolischen Elemente die Vermutung sinnvoll, daß der Erzähler die Reise wieder aufnimmt, nachdem er sie vergessen hat, “in order to create myth” (Haft 181).
Der ‘gars de Semur’ ist zum Beispiel unter Umständen eine erinnerte Figur, in jedem Fall aber hat er eine bestimmte literarische Funktion, nämlich den des Zuhörers in der Geschichte, der dafür zuständig ist, daß das Erlebte nicht aus der Erinnerung verschwindet oder zum Trauma wird. So ist auch die Reise, abgesehen von ihrer erinnerten Tatsache, auch eine Figur, es “is made to encapsule every element of the concentration camp universe” und “it contains within itself the camp experience” (Haft 40). Es ist also eine Figur die das darstellen soll, was der Erzähler, Gérard, zu erzählen nicht imstande ist. Im Grunde, könnte man sagen, gewinnt so das Nicht-Erzählte Konturen durch das Erzählen des sich davor und des sich danach Ereignenden. Eine andere Art dem Nicht-Erzählten eine Form zu geben stellt die Figur des Hans von Freiberg zu Freiberg dar, aber dazu später.
Ähnlich funktionieren die literarischen Anspielungen die diesen Text überfluten. Die zwei wichtigsten dieser literarischen Bezugspunkte bilden marxistische Texte und das Werk Marcel Prousts. Besonders auf das letztere wird oft zurückgegriffen. Ob es sich nun um Abwandlungen berühmter Formulierungen handelt, so wird etwa ” Longtemps je me suis couché de bonne heure” umgeschrieben zu ” Je me suis longtemps couché de bonne heure” (cf. Kaplan 325), oder um eine Parallele zwischen einer literarischen Reminiszenz und einem erinnerten Ereignis, das zu einer zentrale Episode des Romans ausgebaut wird, der Begegnung mit einer Jüdin nämlich, die Gérard nach dem Weg fragt (cf. Haft 43), oder schließlich um die sprachlichen Strukturen und Figuren wie der mémoire spontanée, die bei Semprun wie bei Proust die erzählerische Darstellung von Erinnerung bestimmt, Proust ist allgegenwärtig. Ein anderer wichtiger literarischer Bezugspunkt ist der Reisetopos, weist der Roman doch zumindest Beziehungen zu zwei anderen Reisetexten der Weltliteratur auf, zum einen zu Baudelaires Gedicht “Le Voyage” und zum anderen zu Dantes Divina Commedia (cf. Ferrán 283).
Wortspiele und Anspielungen, die weder literarische Referenz noch eigenständige Figuren sind, bilden das dritte wichtige Element im Erzählkonstrukt, das in Le Grand Voyage über das Erinnerungskonstrukt gelegt ist und sich so mit ihm verbunden hat, daß an vielen Stellen unentscheidbar ist, was Erinnerung und was erzählerische Struktur ist. In diese Gruppe gehören Ortsnamen wie das Tabou, das als Wortspiel für sich stehen kann, oder Semur, das in dem Gebiet liegt, in dem wichtige erinnerte Ereignisse situiert werden, und das sich ausgerechnet als Teil der Bezeichnung des namenlosen Gesprächspartners im Deportationszug wiederfindet. Erwähnung findet auch die Tatsache, daß Buchenwald bei Weimar gelegen ist, der Stadt, wo einige der großen Klassiker der deutschen Literatur weite Teile ihres Lebens verbracht haben, darunter Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. Die Tatsache, daß dessen Werk missbraucht wurde für völkisches Denken war sowohl zur Zeit der Fahrt, man denke nur einmal an Walter Flex, als auch zum Zeitpunkt, da Gérard die Geschichte erzählt, wohlbekannt . Und schließlich, auf dem Weg ins Lager, passiert der Zug Trier, die Geburtsstadt von Karl Marx, der seine wichtigsten Werke außerhalb der Grenzen Deutschlands verfasst hat und dessen Gesellschaftsanalyse Gérard dazu dient, sich, dem ‘gars de Semur’ und dem Leser den Faschismus zu erklären. Zusammen bildet diese Erzählschicht die über der Erinnerung liegt, nicht nur die Möglichkeit, eine Geschichte zu erzählen, sondern sie hilft auch der Erinnerung aus, denn Erinnerung ist in Le Grand Voyage kein einfacher Prozeß und das Erzählen von Erinnerung schon gar nicht.

In Le Grand Voyage ist es mit der Erinnerung keine einfache Sache. Das Projekt des Erzählers ist es zweifellos, sich zu erinnern, “refaire ce voyage” (GV 29) und jemandem davon zu erzählen. Jedoch bekommt dieser Impuls zum Erzählen, zum Erinnern, immer wieder negative Entsprechungen, so wie das stete Vergessen und das fast körperliche Unwohlsein, das im Erzähler spontan auftauchende Erinnerungen auslösen: “J’étais immobile, […] une fois encore blessé à mort par les souvenirs de ce voyage” (GV 152). Die erwünschte, vom Impuls gedeckte Sorte Erinnerung ist offenbar die memoire volontaire. Diese Sorte Erinnerung errfolgt im Allgemeinen langsam und nach und nach, und zwar in einer der Gelegenheit angemessenen Ordnung (cf. Helstrup et al. 295). Es ist vergleichsweise leicht, diese Art Erinnerung in eine Erzählung umzuformen und “present the situations and episodes such that within the reader a sensibility is created […] and hereby make him share the world of the Narrator.” (Bartsch 120). Wie man auch zum Beispiel an der Episode mit dem deutschen Soldaten sieht, sind solche Erinnerungen auch recht strukturiert und können, wie in der angeführten Episode (cf. GV 47ff.) sogar die Form eines Arguments annehmen. Diese Eigenschaft von willkürlichen Erinnerungen wird im Roman durchaus erkannt und als positiv verbucht: “Il y a une autre méthode, aussi. C’est de profiter de ce voyage pour faire le tri.” (GV 34).
Jedoch, “involuntary memories do not simply capture schematic knowledge” (Helstrup et al. 295). Unwillkürliche Erinnerungen erscheinen spontan, ohne den Willen, sie hervorzurufen (cf. Helstrup 293f.), so sagt Gérard über eine davon, daß “elle a explosé tout à coup” (GV 253). Sie sind der wichtigste Bestandteil von Gérards erzählten Erinnerungen. Es kann sogar sein, daß die als kontrolliert dargestellten Erinnerungen eigentlich nur erzählerisch aufbereitete unwillkürliche Erinnerungen sind, die deshalb bearbeitet sind, “um […] die Vorrangstellung des Geistes gegenüber dem unwillkürlichen Einbruch der Vergangenheit ins gegenwärtige Bewußtsein zu behaupten.” (Küster 53f.). Die direkte, verletzende Wirkung traumatischer Ereignisse wirkt sich auch auf die zerrissene Form des Textes, die sich in den ständigen Tempuswechseln zeigt, aus (cf. Suleiman 136).

Es ist jedoch bereits eine enorme Leistung Gérards, aus der traumatischen Erinnerung, die manche “as an underground river of recollection” (Winter 271) mit sich herumtragen, eine zusammenhängende Erzählung zu konstruieren. Paradoxerweise ist es nicht das Sprechen oder Erzählen das ihn darauf vorbereitet, sondern das Schweigen, vielmehr: das Vergessen. Das Schweigen nach dem Ereignis, das ja hier ein öffentliches Schweigen ist und noch kein echtes Vergessen “était la seule façon de s’en sortir” (GV 125). Schweigen als der einzige Ausweg, das erscheint im Zusammenhang mit der Traumatheorie, in der das Sprechen über das Trauma der beste Weg ist, damit fertig zu werden, paradox. Nun präzisiert Gérard jedoch, daß es sich nicht darum handelt, nicht darüber zu reden, sondern eher, nicht Fragen zu beantworten. Hier klingt die berühmte Antwort nach, die ein Aufseher Primo Levi gibt und die Lanzmann in seinem opus magnum Shoah übernimmt: “Hier ist kein Warum” (Levi, Ist das ein Mensch, 18). Gérard betont auch an anderer Stelle, daß seinen ehemaligen Mithäftlingen nicht geholfen ist mit Erklärungen: “[ils] n’ont pas besoin d’explication” (GV 89).
Also ist dieses Schweigen zunächst ein sich-Verweigern an die ‘üblichen’ Fragen. Andererseits macht es auch den Eindruck eines Selbstschutzmechanismus’, wobei diese beiden Konzepte schwer zu trennen sind. Schließlich beschließt Gérard sogar, bestimmte Episoden zu vergessen. Aber es ist nicht klar, ob Gérard, wenn er sagt “j’avais tout oublié” (GV 193), wirklich meint, er habe alles vergessen. Schließlich scheint er sich der Präsenz der Erinnerungen wohl bewußt zu sein, denn er vertraut darauf, daß die Erinnerungen einfach wieder zur Verfügung stehen werden, wenn er das will, “tout était là” (GV 29), schreibt er an anderer Stelle. Das ‘Vergessen’ kann also kein Vergessen im herkömmlichen Sinn sein, es ist vielmehr festzustellen, daß es sich bei dem Vergessen wohl eher um das eben beschriebene Schweigen handelt, das ein Nichtssprechen über bestimmte Aspekte oder alle Aspekte der Reise und der auf der Reise erfahrenen Greuel ist.
Wenn dies der Fall ist, dann kann man in diesen Passagen einen ersten Hinweis dafür sehen, daß das Schweigen eine Art Vergessen nach sich ziehen kann. Wenn es aber nicht plausiblerweise als persönliches Vergessen gelesen werden kann, schließlich ist der Text durchzogen von unwillkürlicher Erinnerung, dann muß es eine Art öffentliche Erinnerung sein. Die enorm häufige Verwendung von Stilmitteln wie der oben beschriebenen Prolepsis stellt dabei die verschiedenen Grade des Schweigens dar, indem ein Ereignis, das auf der Zugebene stattgefunden hat, zu späteren Zeitpunkten gespiegelt wird, außerdem wird Gérards Umgang mit diesem Ereignis dargestellt . Gleichzeitig wird durch Bemerkungen wie “il va mourir” (GV 165) die Zeitebene der Reise, die so wie sie ist, schon nicht als ‘unschuldig’ gelten kann, mit weiterer schwerer Bedeutung aufgeladen und die Ereignisse in ihrer vollen traumatischen Form gezeigt. Dies ist relevant, wenn man beachtet, daß LaCapra unterscheidet zwischen “the traumatic […] event and the traumatic experience” (LaCapra, History in Transit, 55). Das traumatische Ereignis, also die Reise kann eigentlich ohne weiteres Teil einer Erzählung werden, aber die traumatische Erfahrung läßt sich gerade nicht auf einen bestimmten Zeitpunkt festlegen, also nicht in die Chronologie eines Erzählens einfügen. Gérard jedoch gelingt es durch die Anachronien, dennoch eine recht präzise Darstellung dieser traumatischen Erfahrung zu zeichnen.

Trauma, beziehungsweise das sogenannte Posttraumatische Belastungssyndrom folgt oft einem besonders emotional belastendem Ereignis. Die Erinnerung an ein solches Ereignis ist begleitet von Angst. Weiterhin gilt: “One of the […] features of this disorder […] is that the memory of the traumatic experience remains powerful for decades and is readily reactivated by a variety of stressful circumstances” (Kandel 343). Das heißt, daß das Besondere an einem traumatischen Erlebnis im Grunde eine Verschärfung der Proustschen Erinnerung ist. Das Problem in traumatischen Erinnerungen ist nachgerade nicht die Verdrängung, oder ein wie auch immer gearteter “Gedächtnisschwund”, sondern die Dauerpräsenz von Erinnerungen, die “ungewollt und beharrlich immer wieder” (Caruth 87) zurückkehren. Aus der “überwältigende[n] Unittelbarkeit und Genauigkeit der Erinnerungen” (Caruth 87) ergeben sich dann gewisse Probleme bei der Wiedergabe des Erfahrenen.
Vor allem zwei dieser Probleme sind relevant für diesen Roman. Zum einen der besondere Umgang mit Zeit, denn die sogenannte traumatische Zeit “is circular or fixed rather than linear” (Winter 75). Das bedeutet aber für den Erzähler, daß er mit der gewöhnlichen chronologischen Erzählweise brechen muß, denn das “Fortdauern der Holocaust-Zeit, die als beständig neue Zeit erfahren wird, bedroht die Chronologie der erfahrenen Zeit” (Langer 56, seine Hervorhebung). Gérard löst die Chronologieprobleme, indem er das Zirkuläre, das Wiederkehrende, mit der häufig variierten Figur der Reise zu fassen sucht, es wird die Reise nach Buchenwald zweimal unternommen, und zusätzlich eine Rückreise nach Frankreich und so weiter. Jedoch, es scheint einen Bereich des Romans zu geben, der sich beharrlich dieser Zirkularitätsthese widersetzt, das ist das vergleichsweise konventionell, mit einem traditionellen auktorialen Erzähler erzählte, zweite Kapitel des Romans. Es ist aber nun so, daß für besonders schwierige Ereignisse, deren Erinnerung besonders belastend für den Erzähler ist, eine objektivierende Erzählweise durchaus häufig ist, es “serves as a protective shield” (LaCapra, History in Transit, 70). Im Fall des vorliegenden Romans ist es die “nuit de folie” (GV 236, et passim), die nicht einmal als “vide” (GV 236) bezeichnet wird, wie die der “Nacht des Wahnsinns” direkt vorausgehenden Stunden einmal bezeichnet werden . Denn das ‘vide’ bezeichnet einfach eine Lücke in der Erinnerung, die man mit Anstrengung füllen kann, wenn auch erst nach 16 Jahren. Eine Leere, sofern nichts anderes gesagt wird, impliziert schließlich immer die mehr oder weniger temporäre Abwesenheit von etwas.
Dieses etwas ist aber, um zum zweiten Problem zu kommen, im Falle besonders traumatischer Erinnerung so belastet, daß man seine Stelle nicht einmal als Leere bezeichnen kann, denn es ist wohl, wenn wir die Natur traumatischer Erinnerungen, wie oben angerissen, betrachten, gar nichts abwesend, sondern sehr wohl anwesend. Die Schwierigkeit liegt also eher im Beschreiben als im Erinnern der traumatischen Ereignisse. Daß es aber Gérard gelingt, aus dem Bereich der traumatischen Erinnerungen, dessen Subjekt “essentially passive” ist, in den Bereich der “narrative memory” (beide Zitate Suleiman 139) zu wechseln am Ende ist wichtig, denn nicht nur ist die Trauer und das Verarbeiten ein Teil der narrative memory (cf. Suleiman 139f.), sondern eine erzählerisch glaubwürdige Distanz ermöglicht auch das Ablegen eines Zeugnisses und das damit verbundene Überwinden des Schweigens über ein historisches Ereignis.

Dies ist die entscheidende Funktion des Ankommens, denn um nichts anderes handelt es sich bei der nuit de folie, im Zusammenhang mit dem Ablegen von Zeugnis: “[l]e moment décisif qui fera d’un survivant un témoin est […] la brutale arrivée” (Nicoladzé 233). Die Funktion des Zeugnisablegens in Le Grand Voyage kann gut mit Gérards Ausruf beschrieben werden: “Mais oui, je me rends compte et j’essaie d’en rendre compte” (GV 79): es sich und anderen klar machen, was da passiert ist. Es geht, wohlgemerkt, nicht darum etwas zu erklären, das heißt, nach Ursachen zu suchen. Vielmehr handelt es sich um ein ‘einfaches’ Erzählen des Erlebten. Dies hat verschiedene Folgen, zum einen bedeutet es, daß man auch für jene Zeugnis ablegen muß, die das Lager nicht überlebt haben: “witnesses have special standing as spokesmen for the injured and the dead” (Winter 239). Auch Gérard ist sich dieser Verantwortung bewußt: “il faut que je parle au nom des choses qui sont arrivées pas au mon nom personnel” (GV 193). Wichtig ist, von dem Unglück zu erzählen, von den Toten, nicht von Gérard selbst, sagt er. In der hochemotionalen und sehr persönlich wirkenden Darstellung scheint jedoch durch, daß er die Geschichte auch deshalb erzählt, damit er selbst die Nachkriegszeit überstehen kann . (). Aus dieser Doppelbeziehung, persönliche Notwendigkeit einerseits und historische Verantwortung andererseits, ergeben sich schwerwiegende Probleme. Das bekannteste Problem des Zeugens für die Shoah wurde von Primo Levi beschrieben: die Scham.

In Levis Buch Die Untergegangenen und die Geretteten spricht er von einer Scham , überlebt zu haben. “[D]as undefinierbare Unbehagen, das mit der Befreiung einherging, [war] möglicherweise keine eigentliche Scham, aber als solche wurde sie empfunden.” (Levi, Die Untergegangenen und die Geretteten, 72). Die Scham schließt zwar auch “verschiedenartige Elemente” (Levi 74) ein, aber hier wollen wir uns lediglich auf eines dieser Elemente beziehen, die Scham nämlich überlebt zu haben, während so viele andere gestorben sind. Es ist wiederholt darauf hingewiesen worden, daß bei Le Grand Voyage ein weiterer, erschwerender Problemkomplex hinzukommt:

Unlike Jews, resistance fighters were interned in the concentration camps due to acts of will rather than genetic heritage and, as grim as deportation and camp conditions were, members of the resistance were better treated and consequently had higher survival rates than Jewish prisoners. (Kaplan 328)

Nicht nur hat Gérard also überlebt während Millionen anderer gestorben sind, sondern er hatte in der Zwischenzeit auch ein angenehmeres Schicksal. Dies bleibt ihm selbst nicht verborgen, so berichtet er, daß “il y a encore une autre façon de voyager, pour les Juifs, j’ai vu cela plus tard” (GV 110). Zwar wird in diesem Zusammenhang in der Forschungsliteratur immer die Funktion der Jüdin, der Gérard den Weg zum Bahnhof zeigt, aufgeführt, als der diesem Problemkomplex entsprechende Erinnerungsteil (vgl. z.B. Kaplan 327), ich möchte aber im folgenden einen weiteren Textteil in diesem Zusammenhang besprechen.

Aus der Figur Hans von Freiberg zu Freiberg, ein deutscher Jude, der in die Résistance eintrat, um nicht aufgrund seiner Abstammung zu sterben, sondern aufgrund seiner Handlungen, ergeben sich verschiedene wichtige Verbindungen zu den zuletzt besprochenen Themen. Während der Zugfahrt, während sich die Zugfahrt im Grunde dem Ende näherte, spricht Gérard mit einem Widerstandkämpfer über seinen Freund Hans, der, während Gérard schon einsaß, mit der Nachhut einer Résistancegruppe verloren ging, womöglich aufgerieben wurde. Während der Fahrt und des Lageraufenthalts “läßt sich die Hoffnung, sein Freund könnte überlebt haben, noch aufrecht erhalten” (Neuhofer 112). Später jedoch, als Gérard auf alte Freunde trifft und auch eine Reise in das Gebiet unternimmt, in dem er und Hans zu Résistancezeiten aktiv waren, zeichnet sich ab, daß Hans wohl nicht überlebt hat. Gewissheit ist jedoch über dieses Faktum nicht zu erlangen, denn niemand der überlebenden Mitkämpfer hat Hans sterben sehen. Zuletzt gibt Gérard auf: “je réalise subitement, que nous ne retrouverons jamais la trace de Hans” (GV 213).
Aus dieser noch wenig spektakulären, wenn auch sentimentalen Geschichte läßt sich erst Gewinn ziehen, wenn wir uns die in Kapitel 2.3 dargelegte Doppelstruktur ins Gedächtnis rufen. Es wird im Text, wenn man darauf achtet, sehr stark auf das Konstrukt “Hans” hingewiesen, beginnend damit, daß der mitteilende Widerstandskämpfer nur “une voix” (GV 205 et passim) ist und ausgeweitet durch Namen wie etwa ‘Tabou’. Der entscheidene Hinweis für die Funktion von Hans als Teil der Erzählstruktur ergibt sich aus der Auflösung eines Rätsels. Während Gérard mit einem Freund auf der Spur von Hans ist, werden ihm die Umstände von Hans’ Verschwinden erzählt. Hans, als Teil der Nachhut, ging mitsamt der Nachhut, auf einem nächtlichen Marsch durch die Wälder verloren. Dies löst in Gérard eine ganz andere Erinnerung aus: “[d]epuis que le type nous a raconté leur fuite, à travers la forêt, la nuit du ‘Tabou’, j’ai l’impression que je vais me souvenir d’une autre marche de nuit das las forêt” (GV 223). Diese Erinnerung plagt ihn fortan. Dieses Rätsel wird spät aufgelöst: das zweite Kapitel des Romans, in dem die nuit de folie beschrieben wird, enthält eben diesen ‘anderen’ Marsch. Es ist der Marsch von der Verladerampe des Zugs zum Lager Buchenwald.
Durch die Parallelisierung der Juden, die zum Lager marschieren und Hans der durch die französischen Wälder marschiert, wird, neben der Bestätigung des Erfolgs von Hans’ Vorhaben, seinen Tod betreffend, eine metonymische Beziehung suggeriert, in der Hans’ Schicksal für das Schicksal der Juden stehen kann. Hans, dessen Spur sich verliert in der Geschichte, weil niemand seinem Tod beiwohnte und niemand sein Schicksal bezeugen kann. Hans stirbt nicht, er verschwindet einfach (vgl. besonders GV 221 et passim), und das stellt die Wirklichkeit seines Todes infrage, denn womöglich ist man nicht wirklich tot, wenn man sich einfach verliert (vgl. GV 232f.). Es wird so eine Frage des Umgangs mit dem Schweigen.

Das Verschwinden von Hans ist nicht das erste Mal, daß Vergessen bzw. Verschweigen als Problem, was die Beziehung Erinnerung/Wirklichkeit betrifft, vom Roman thematisiert wird. Das andere Mal betrifft die von Gérard erinnerte Episode mit einer Jüdin, an die sich besagte Jüdin nach dem Krieg nicht erinnern kann, was Gérard wiederum zur Feststellung verleitet: “si vous avez oublié, c’est vrai que je ne vous ai pas vue” (GV 114). An dieser Stelle ist das jedoch noch ambivalent, schließlich ging der Leser mit dem ‘Wissen’ um die Episode in diese Passage, was die Möglichkeit einer Deutung des Satzes als übereilt möglich macht, schließlich hat Gérard die Frau doch wiedererkannt, er kann sie sich mithin nicht völlig eingebildet haben.
Im Fall von Hans ist die Lage jedoch prekärer. Das Schweigen beziehungsweise der Mangel an Zeugnissen bewirkt das Verschwinden von Hans. Metonymisch gelesen weist dies auf die ebenso prekäre Lage der Lagerzeugnisse hin, jedoch schweigt gerade der vorliegende Roman, von kleinen Nebenbemerkungen abgesehen, vom Lagerleben. Es scheint, als ob dieses Schweigen angesichts der möglichen verheerenden Auswirkungen schwer zu rechtfertigen sei. Jedoch stellt dieses Schweigen eine kraftvolle Aussage dar, denn es macht deutlich, daß man etwas nicht aussprechen muß, um es zu erzählen.

The Holocaust as the very figure of a silence […] which our very efforts at remembering […] only reenact and keep repeating, but which a certain silent mode of testimony can translate and thus make us remember” (Felman 164)

Es geht also offenbar nicht unbedingt um ein explizites Erzählen, sondern vielmehr um ein Mitteilen. Entscheidend ist ein inneres Engagement, so wie es bei Gérard der Fall ist, als er beschließt, daß er Hans’ wahrscheinlichen Tod einfach für sich annehmen muß, damit Hans ‘sterben’ kann, er muß ihn Teil seines Lebens werden lassen (cf. GV 233).
Wenn man dieses individuelle Erinnern und Vergessen nun aber auf die kollektive Ebene hebt, denn “forgetfulness […] undoubtedly subsists in a collective version as well” (Wallace 104), dann sieht man schnell, welche Schlüsse dieses in diesem schmalen Roman erörterte Problem in bezug auf das kollektive Erinnern und Vergessen, kurz: auf das kollektive Gedächtnis, zulässt. Es geht um eine kollektive Anstrengung, ein Gedenken, durch das auch Fehlstellen in den individuellen Gedächtnissen ausgeglichen werden können. Die Vergangenheit bleibt ja ohnehin “nicht wirklich im individuellen Gedächtnis verhaftet” (Marcel und Mucchielli 200), denn das kollektive Gedächtnis ist nicht einfach ein Sammelbecken für die verschiedenen individuellen Gedächtnisse. Vielmehr bedingen sich nach Maurice Halbwachs individuelle Gedächtnisse und kollektive Repräsentation gegenseitig, so daß nur beide zusammen “wirkliche Erinnerungen” (Marcel und Mucchielli 200) produzieren. Wirklichkeit und Erinnerungen sind nur an dieser Stelle fest miteinander verbunden. Es gibt also eine Notwendigkeit des Zeugnisablegens, um das Schweigen zu überwinden, so wie Gérard sich schließlich dazu entschließen will, Zeugnis abzulegen vom Tod Hans’. Das Schweigen hat zwar, sofern es nur ein Schweigen über bestimmte Aspekte und eine nach Gründen suchende Fragestellung ist, durchaus positive, bewahrende Funktion. Schließlich aber hat sich das Schweigen als Gefahr für die kollektive Erinnerung herauskristallisiert.

Seitdem es Literatur über die Shoah gibt, gibt es auch das Problem, wie man mit dieser Entsetzlichkeit umgeht. “Holocaust writing is a literature not simply of violence but of atrocity. Atrocity is a form of violence that is capricious, unexpected, and above all, without apparent reason” (Gartland 47). Dies macht es schwierig, darüber vernünftige Literatur zu schreiben. Noch 1994 schrieb der bekannte Holocaustforscher Dominick LaCapra, er sei noch auf der Suche nach einer Sprache, mit der man das, was in den Lagern passierte und die Schlüsse, die man daraus ziehen soll, angemessen beschreiben kann (cf. LaCapra, Representing the Holocaust, 202).
Das vielbeschworene ‘Unsagbare’ hat jedoch bereits Ausdrucksformen gefunden, das Schweigen nämlich, das uneigentliche Sprechen und das Fragment, in dem oftmals beides zusammenkommt. Problematisch wird, wie wir gesehen haben, das Schweigen erst in dem Augenblick, in dem es ein Verschweigen wird. Aber dieses Verschweigen setzt ein Verstandenes voraus, das ver-schwiegen werden muß. In der Literatur über die Shoah muß jedoch Zeugnis abgelegt werden von etwas, das nicht so einfach zu verstehen ist und über das noch viel schwieriger zu erzählen ist.
Wittgenstein schrieb im Tractatus, worüber man nicht sprechen könne, darüber solle man schweigen. Das trifft auch auf den vorliegenden Roman zu. Man soll unbedingt sprechen über die Shoah, aber wenn man dies nicht vermag so soll man in andere Möglichkeiten ausweichen, wie der Roman demonstriert, kann das Schweigen eines davon sein. Es ist besser zu schweigen als nichts zu sagen, und etwas muß passieren.
Und schließlich kann man immer auch Berichte, Zeugenaussagen unter dem Aspekt betrachten, daß das “Schreiben eines Überlebenden nach dem Holocaust […] der Beweis dafür [ist], daß er über die ‘Endlösung’ gesiegt hat” (Young 69). “The literature of silence is not without a voice; it whispers of a new life” (Hassan 201), und obwohl dieser Roman nicht auf einer versöhnlichen Note endet, was bei dem Thema auch eher unangebracht wäre, steckt in der erzählerischen Kraft, die den Roman vorantreibt tatsächlich der Keim von etwas Neuem.

Agamben, Giorgio. Was von Auschwitz bleibt: Das Archiv und der Zeuge. Frankfurt a. M.:
Suhrkamp, 2003.
Bartsch, Renate. Memory and Understanding: Concept formation in Proust’s A la recherche du temps perdu. Amsterdam/Philadephia: Benjamins, 2005.
Brewer, William F. “What is recollective memory?” Remembering our past: Studies in autobiographical memory. Ed. David C. Rubin. Cambridge: Cambridge U.P., 1996. 19-66.
Bublitz, Wolfram. “It utterly boggles the mind: Knowledge, common ground and coherence”
Language and Memory: Aspects of Knowledge Representation. Ed. Hanna Pishwa. Berlin/New York: De Gruyter, 2006. 359-386.
Caruth, Cathy. “Trauma als historische Erfahrung: Die Vergangenheit einholen” ‘Niemand zeugt für
den Zeugen’: Erinnerungskultur und historische Verantwortung nach der Shoah. Ed. Ulrich
Baer. Frankfurt a.M.: Suhrkamp, 2000. 84-100.
Dana, Catherine. Fictions pour mémoire: Camus, Perec et l’écriture de la shoah. Paris: L’Harmattan, 1998.
De Man, Paul. The Rhetoric of Romanticism. New York: Columbia UP, 1984.
Dunker, Axel. Die anwesende Abwesenheit: Literatur im Schatten von Auschwitz. München: Fink,
2003.
Faber, Richard. Erinnern und Darstellen des Unauslöschlichen: Über Jorge Semprúns KZ-Literatur.
Berlin: edition tranvia, 1995.
Felman, Shoshana. “After the Apocalypse: Paul de Man and the Fall to Silence” Testimony: Crises of Witnessing in Literature, Psychoanalysis, and History. New York/London: Routledge, 1992. 120-165.
Ferrán, Ofelia. “‘Cuanto más escribido, más me queda por decir’: Memory, Trauma, and Writing in the Work of Jorge Semprún” MLN 116 (2001): 266-294.
Fitzgerald, J.M. “Autobiographical Memory and Conceptualizations of the Self” Theoretical Perspectives on Autobiographical Memory. Ed. Martin A. Conway, David C. Rubin und Hans Spinnler. Dordrecht/Boston/London: Kluwer, 1992. 99-114.
Gartland, Patricia A. “Three Holocaust Writers: Speaking the Unspeakable” Critique 25 (1983): 45-56.
Genette, Gérard. Figures III. Paris: Du Seuil, 1972.
Haft, Cynthia. The Theme of Nazi Concentration Camps in French Literature. The Hague/Paris: Mouton, 1973.
Hassan, Ihab. The Literature of Silence: Henry Miller and Samuel Beckett. New York: Knopf, 1967.
Helstrup, Tore; Rosanna de Beni; Cesare Cornoldi, Asher Koriat. “Memory Pathways: Involuntary and
voluntary processes in retrieving personal memories” Everyday Memory. Ed. Sven
Magnussen und Tore Helstrup. Hove/New York: Psychology Press, 2007. 291-316.
Kandel, Eric R. In Search Of Memory: The Emergence of a New Science of Mind. New York/
London: Norton, 2006.
Kaplan, Brett Ashley. “‘The Bitter Residue of death’: Jorge Semprun and the Aesthetics of Holocaust Memory” Comparative Literature (2003): 320-337.
Küster, Lutz. Obsession der Erinnerung: das literarische Werk Jorge Semprúns. Frankfurt a.M.: Vervuert, 1989.
LaCapra, Dominick. Representing the Holocaust: History, Theory, Trauma. Ithaca/London: Cornell U.P., 1994.
LaCapra, Dominick. History in Transit: Experience, Identity, Critical Theory. Ithaka/London: Cornell
UP, 2004.
Langer, Lawrence. “Die Zeit der Erinnerung: Zeitverlauf und Dauer in Zeugenaussagen von
Überlebenden des Holocaust” ‘Niemand zeugt für den Zeugen’: Erinnerungskultur und
historische Verantwortung nach der Shoah. Ed. Ulrich Baer. Frankfurt a.M.: Suhrkamp, 2000.
53-67.
Laub, Dori. “An Event without a Witness: Truth, Testimony and Survival” Testimony: Crises of Witnessing in Literature, Psychoanalysis, and History. New York/London: Routledge, 1992. 75-93.
Lebow, Richard Ned. “The Memory of Politics in Postwar Europe” The Politics of Memory in Postwar Europe. Ed. Richard Ned Lebow, Wulf Kansteiner and Claudio Fogu. Durham/London: Duke U.P., 2006. 1-39.
Lejeune, Philippe. Le Pacte Autobiographique: nouvelle edition augmentée. Paris: Du Seuil, 1996.
Lejeune, Philippe. “Avant-propos” Genèses du “Je”: Manuscrits et autobiographie. Ed. Philippe Lejeune und Catherine Viollet. Paris: CNRS Editions, 2001. 7-14.
Levi, Primo. Die Untergegangenen und die Geretteten. München/Wien: Hanser, 1990.
Levi, Primo. Ist das ein Mensch? München: dtv, 1992.
Marcel, Jean-Christophe, Laurent Mucchielli. “Eine Grundlage des lien social: das kollektive Gedächtnis nach Maurice Halbwachs” Maurice Halbwachs: Aspekte des Werks. Ed. Stephan Egger. Konstanz: UVK, 2003. 191-228.
Möckel, Klaus. “Bücher wider das Vergessen” Sinn und Form 18 (1966): 1050-1060.
Neuhofer, Monika. “Écrire un seul livre, sans cesse renouvelé”: Jorge Sempruns literarische Auseinandersetzung mit Buchenwald. Frankfurt a.M.: Klostermann, 2006.
Nicoladzé, Françoise. La deuxième vie de Jorge Semprun: Une écriture tressée aux spirales de l’Histoire. Castelnau-le-nez: Climats, 1997.
Rosenfeld, Alvin. Ein Mund voll Schweigen: Literarische Reaktionen auf den Holocaust. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2000.
Schacter, Daniel L. Searching for Memory: The Brain, the Mind, and the Past. New York: Basic, 1996.
Schacter, Daniel L. Aussetzer: Wie wir vergessen und uns erinnern. Übers. Hainer Kober. Bergisch Gladbach: Lübbe, 2001.
Semprun, Jorge. Le Grand Voyage. Paris: Folio, 1972.
Shabad, Peter. “The most intimate of creations: Symptoms as Memorials to One’s Lonely Suffering” Symbolic Loss: The Ambiguity of Mourning and Memory at Century’s End. Ed. Peter Homans. 197-212.
Sodi, Risa. “The Rhetoric of the Univers Concentrationnaire” Memory and Mastery: Primo Levi as Writer and Witness. Ed. Roberta S. Kremer. Albany: State University of NY Press, 2001.
35-59.
Suleiman, Susan Rubin. Crises of Memory and the Second World War. Cambridge: Harvard U.P.,
2000.
Thompson, Richard F.; Stephen A. Madison. Memory: The Key To Consciousness. Washington, D.C.: Joseph Henry Press, 2005.
Tschuggnall, Karoline. Sprachspiele des Erinnerns: Lebensgeschichte, Gedächtnis und Kultur. Gießen: Psychosozial-Verlag, 2004.
Wallace, Nathaniel. “Cultural Dormancy and Collective Memory from the Book of Genesis to Aharon Appelfeld” The Conscience of Humankind: Literature and Traumatic Experiences. Ed. Elrud Ibsch. Amsterdam/Atlanta: Rodopi, 2000. 101-115.
Weigel, Sigrid. “Télescopage im Unbewußten: zum Verhältnis von Trauma, Geschichtsbegriff und Literatur” Trauma: Zwischen Psychoanalyse und kulturellem Deutungsmuster. Ed. Elisabeth Bronfen, Birgit R. Erdle und Sigrid Weigel. Weimar/Wien: Böhlau, 1999. 51-76.
Winter, Jay. Remembering War: The Great War Between Memory and History in the Twentieth Century. New Haven: Yale U.P., 2006.
Young, James Edward. Beschreiben des Holocaust: Darstellung und Folgen der Interpretation. Frankfurt a.M.: Jüdischer Verlag, 1992.

Das Wort "Holocaust"

Wenn dagegen mit dem Begriff ‘Holocaust’ eine auch nur entfernte Verbindung zwischen Auschwitz und biblischem olah, zwischen dem Tod in den Gaskammern und der “vollkommenen Hingabe an heilige und höhere Ziele” hergestellt wird, dann kann das nur wie Hohn klingen. Dieser Ausdruck schließt nicht nur einen unannehmbaren Vergleich von Krematorien und Altären ein, sondern auch eine von Anfang an antijüdisch gefärbte Bedeutungsgeschichte. […] Wer ihn weiterhin verwendet, beweist Unwissenheit oder Mangel an Sensibilität oder beides.

Giorgio Agamben, Was von Auschwitz bleibt: Das Archiv und der Zeuge (Homo Sacer III)

"Radikal zuerst zerstören": Über die Auseinandersetzung mit der Konservativen Revolution in Thomas Bernhards Romanen "Frost" und "Auslöschung".

[Das Folgende habe ich in wenigen Tagen geschrieben, und es ist auch schon was älter. Wie immer verweise ich gerne darauf, daß es trotz seiner *hust* Schwächen durchaus informativ sein kann.]

1. Einleitung

Das Werk des österreichischen Autors Thomas Bernhard gibt seinen Interpreten auch nach Jahrzehnten ergiebiger Forschungsliteratur immer noch Rätsel auf. Zwischen den ‘Österreichbeschimpfungen’ und komplexen Auseinandersetzungen mit Philosophen von Schopenhauer bis Wittgenstein bietet es Ansatzmöglichkeiten für eine Vielzahl an Deutungen, “weil divergente […] Interpretationsinteressen daran herangetragen wurden”[1], auch im gesellschafts-theoretischen Bereich, in dem sich die vorliegende Arbeit bewegen wird.

Eine Nähe oder wenigstens eine poetische Korrespondenz zu Werken der Konservativen Revolution hat man Bernhard bislang nicht nachgewiesen[2]. Zu überzogen schienen die apodiktischen Urteile von Bernhards Figuren, als daß sich dahinter eine “dezidiert politische”[3] Meinung, die sich nicht auf einen Holocaustkommentar[4] beschränkt oder sich lediglich in rüden Beschimpfungen erschöpft, verbergen könnte.

Genau diese Nähe jedoch wird die vorliegende Arbeit nachweisen. Es gilt zu zeigen, daß Bernhards Texten eine klare Position abzulesen ist, die mit dem schlichten Urteil ‘Kulturpessimismus’ nicht zu fassen ist. Vielmehr scheint diese Position, die sich im Laufe seines Werkes immer weiter verästelt und verfeinert, gut mit Kategorien der sogenannten Konservativen Revolution erklärbar zu sein.

Es wird der vorliegenden Arbeit mehr um eine Darstellung von Bernhards Text und seinen Argumenten zu tun sein, als um eine Diskussion des Begriffs ‘Konservative Revolution’. Aus diesem Grund wird auf lediglich zwei Texte dieser Bewegung[5] Bezug genommen. Hofmannsthals “Das Schrifttum als geistiger Raum der Nation” sowie Borchardts “Schöpferische Restauration” dienen als programmatische Schriften für das, was im folgenden unter dem Begriff der Konservativen Revolution gefasst wird..

Nach einer kurzen Darstellung der beiden Texte folgt eine Untersuchung zweier Bernhardscher Romane unter den erarbeiteten Gesichtspunkten. Diese Texte sind sein erster Roman, Frost, und sein letzter, Auslöschung. Es wird sich zeigen, daß Bernhards Werk sich von einer umfassenden Kulturkritik hin zu einer Untersuchung der Möglichkeiten einer Restauration bewegt, die Visionen der Konservativen Revolution, wie sie Hofmannsthal und Borchardt verstanden, fest im Blick.

2. Die Konservative Revolution

2.1. Die Textauswahl

Hermann Rudolph schreibt:: “Der Begriff der Konservativen Revolution ist zwar nicht von Hofmannsthal geprägt worden, sein Plädoyer für ihn in der Rede ‘Das Schrifttum als geistiger Raum der Nation’ scheint aber nicht unwesentlich zu seiner Fixierung im Bewußtsein der Öffentlichkeit beigetragen zu haben”[6]. Nun ist es nicht im Interesse der vorliegenden Arbeit, Definitionen des Begriffs der Konservativen Revolution gegeneinander abzuwägen, sich gar auf das Gebiet der soziologisch-politischen Untersuchung zu begeben. Hofmannsthals Rede scheint den Geist jener politischen Bewegung getroffen zu haben[7], dieser Umstand, sowie der hohe Grad an Erwähnungen dieses Textes im Rahmen von Diskussionen der Konservativen Revolution, sprechen für eine Verwendung der Rede.

Es ist jedoch nicht ausreichend, die Analyse Bernhardschen Konservativismus allein auf Hofmannsthals Rede zu stützen, schon aufgrund ihrer wenig spezifischen Diskussion des Kritisierten, ihre “formelhaften Wendungen ließen viele Möglichkeiten der Interpretation und der Realisierung offen”[8]. Als eine Ergänzung bietet sich Rudolf Borchardts Rede zur “Schöpferischen Restauration”[9] an, da ihre Kritik an der deutschen Gesellschaft weit konkreter ausfällt, Borchardt sich in ihr eindeutiger festlegt[10] und sie somit hilfreicher im Rahmen der vorliegenden Untersuchung ist.

Die Borchardtsche Rede hat zwar nicht denselben Bekanntheitsgrad wie die Hofmannsthalsche, jedoch ist sie geeignet, um die vielen dunklen Ecken von Hofmannsthals poetisch überladenem Text auszuleuchten, da Borchardt sich auf Details des von Hofmannsthal skizzierten Programms “eine[r] konservative[n] Revolution von einem Umfange, wie die europäische Geschichte ihn nicht kennt”,[11] einläßt. Im folgenden werden kurz zentrale Punkte der beiden Reden referiert, um den Boden für die Lektüre von Frost zu bereiten.

2.2. “Das Schrifttum als geistiger Raum der Nation”

Diese Rede, “eine Art Zusammenfassung seines Weltbildes”,[12] hielt Hofmannsthal zwei Jahre vor seinem Tod und ein Jahr vor Borchardts Rede. Wie später Borchardt das 18. Jahrhundert als Parallele zu seiner Gegenwart konstruiert, so beschäftigt sich Hofmannsthal in seiner Rede zunächst mit dem, was die französische Kultur der deutschen voraus hat[13].

Der wichtigste Vorteil der Franzosen scheint nun nach Hofmannsthal zu sein, daß sie über eine “reine Sprache”[14] verfügen, mit deren Hilfe sie den in der deutschen Kultur allgegenwärtigen “Riß […] zwischen Gebildeten und Ungebildeten”[15] überwinden können. In der Sprache “redet Vergangenes zu uns, […] wir ahnen dahinter ein Etwas waltend”[16], nämlich “den Geist der Nationen”[17]. Es handelt sich hierbei nicht um gesprochene Sprache, sondern um Schrifttum, “Aufzeichnungen aller Art”[18].

Die Deutschen sind zwar nach Hofmannsthal beherrscht von den sogenannten Bildungsphilistern, aber auch unter ihnen regt sich Widerstand. “Das geistige Gewissen der Nation”[19], sind die Suchenden, “Träger […] dieser produktiven Anarchie”[20], was die genaueste Beschreibung der Konservativen Revolution ist, die man im Text finden kann. Zentral in der Bewegung der Suchenden sind verschiedene Führergestalten, die außerhalb der gesellschaftlichen Ordnung stehen. Gleichwohl ist nicht Individualismus, sondern Einheit der Leitgedanke von Hofmannsthals Vision: “[a]lle Zweiteilungen […] sind im Geiste zu überwinden […]; alles im äußeren Zerklüftete muß […] dort in eines gedichtet werden, damit außen Einheit werde.”[21]

“Hofmannsthal sagt nirgends klar und eindeutig, was er unter konservativer Revolution versteht.”[22] Dafür muss erst Borchardt kommen, mit seiner Eloge auf die Romantik und seiner Verdammung des modernen Menschen in seiner Rede zur schöpferischen Restauration.

2.3. “Schöpferische Restauration”

Borchardt entwickelte die Idee der schöpferischen Restauration als Teil einer Redekampagne[23]. So hat sie auch, anders als die etwas zerfahrene Vorgängerrede Hugo von Hofmannsthals, eine ausgeklügelte rhetorische Struktur, die sich des Hauptstilmittels der Analogie bedient.

Ohne Umschweife erklärt Borchardt früh, wem seine Sympathien gehören und wen es anzugreifen gilt. Auf der einen Seite sind die “Schöpfer, Begeisterer und Former”[24] der Romantik, und auf der anderen Seite sorgt das restliche 18. Jahrhundert für die “Unterjochung dessen, was noch Philosophie heißen kann”[25]. In seine ausführliche, beißende Kritik an den Entartungen, die dieses Jahrhundert hervorgebracht habe, streut Borchardt wiederholt Analogien,[26] so daß die Zuhörer seine Anmerkungen auf ihre eigene Zeit anwenden. Er macht klar, daß bloße Ideen diesen Zustand, damals wie heute, nicht ändern können, dazu wäre eine “Schöpfergestalt”[27] vonnöten, ganz im Sinne von Hofmannsthals “Suchenden”[28].

Borchardt betont stärker als Hofmannsthal die herausragende Rolle der Romantiker im gemeinsamen Geschichtsbild. Seine Romantiker sind nicht nur Suchende, sie sind jene, die einst fanden, wonach heute gesucht wird. Sie haben erkannt, woran es der Welt mangelt, sie hatten Teil an “der klaren, der siegreichen, der seherischen Erkenntnis”[29]. Jedoch, Erkenntnis ist nach Borchardt eine notwendige, nicht aber eine hinreichende Bedingung für den Wechsel.

Erst die “politische Katastrophe der Welt”[30] habe damals die Welt in einen Zustand versetzt, in dem sie bereit für einen Wechsel gewesen sei. Aber die Welt habe ihre Chance nicht genutzt, trotz der Romantiker und ihres weltweiten Einflusses hätten sich entscheidende Entwicklungen “erst nach der Schicksalsstunde und schon in der Stunde verfallenden Rechtes”[31] eingestellt.

Diese Analyse ist der entscheidende Teil der Rede. Was folgt, ist eine harte Kritik am modernen Massenmenschen: “[d]er historische Begriff des Volkes ist zersprungen [und] durch den der neuen Massen ersetzt”[32]. Der moderne Mensch ist nun “auf der Pöbelstufe”[33]. Borchardt bietet nun, da erneut ein Krieg die Weichen für eine Veränderung gestellt hat, seine Idee der schöpferischen Restauration an, und zwar “nicht als Reaktion […], sondern, wenn […] das Wort Revolution hier bedenklich klingt, als eine Reformation an Haupt und Gliedern”[34]. Zu den Maßnahmen dieser Reform gehört eine Stärkung des Nationenbegriffs zuungunsten des Volksbegriffs und ein Aufspüren des Urdeutschen in dem, was heute noch deutsche Kultur und Sprache ist.

3. Frost

3.1. Der Pöbel

Thomas Bernhards Erstlingsroman Frost fasst bereits alle kritischen Einwände in Bernhards Werk gegen die Moderne zusammen, die sich später in anderen Formen in seinem übrigen Texten wiederfinden lassen. Der Protagonist, der Maler Strauch, sagt dem ihn beobachtenden Famulanten mit, wie dieser die Welt zu verstehen habe. Das Bild, das Strauch von der Welt zeichnet, ist düster. Wie viele der frühen Romane Bernhards ist auch Frost auf dem Land angesiedelt. Die Städte in Bernhards späterem Werk, darunter Salzburg, Wien und Rom, sind hier noch ferne Orte.[35] Besonders deutlich wird dies in Frost, da keiner der beiden Protagonisten ursprünglich aus der Ortschaft Weng stammt, in welcher der Roman spielt. Mit dem Betreten von Weng betritt der junge Student gleichzeitig die dunkle Welt von Strauch, seine Aussage, Weng sei “der düsterste Ort” den er “jemals gesehen habe” (F 10),[36] könnte sich genauso auf Strauchs Inneres beziehen, schließlich steht Strauchs sich stetig verschlimmernde Krankheit “in korrelativer Beziehung zu dem Auflösungsprozeß in Weng”.[37]

Weng löst sich tatsächlich auf, und zwar ist nicht die Natur die Ursache, obwohl auch der Wald “von einer eigentümlichen Bedrohlichkeit gekennzeichnet ist”[38], vielmehr ist es die moderne Welt, die den Ort in Besitz genommen hat. Weng, das doch eigentlich in einer ländlichen Gegend liegt, ist bevölkert vom Proletariat, das “im Laufe von drei Jahrzehnten ins Tal hereingeschwemmt worden ist” (F 109). Die auf diese Weise neu zusammengesetzte Bevölkerung ist krank, “[d]as Tal ist berüchtigt wegen seiner Tuberkulosefälle” (F 149). “Die Bäuerlichen” (F 109) werden nach und nach verdrängt von dem Proletariat, das mit der modernen Industrie ins Tal kommt, welche die Krankheit mit sich bringt. Die Tuberkulose nämlich “scheint mit den Abwässern der Zellulosefabrik zusammenzuhängen” (F 149), eines der drei Industriemerkmale in der Gegend neben dem Kraftwerk (vgl. F 214f.) und der Eisenbahn.

In der Trennung, die zwischen den Bauern und dem Proletariat verläuft, befindet sich ein deutlicher Anklang an Borchardts Pöbel einerseits und seine Trauer um das verlorene “Volk der Romantik”[39] andererseits. Die Macht des Pöbels nimmt in Weng zu, die Bauern, die mit dem Katholizismus[40] identifiziert werden, haben “ausgespielt”, denn der “Kommunismus schreitet weit aus. In ein paar Jahren gibt es nur noch den Kommunismus. Und Bauerntum ist dann nur noch ein Traum.” (F 109)

3.2. Träumen

Der eigentliche Traum aber hinter der gehässigen Wengbeschimpfung des Malers, die auch auf den Famulanten abfärbt, ist der einer “vorindustrielle[n] aristokratische[n] Utopie[]”[41], etwas, das überdeutlich wird, wenn Strauch von den “Herrenhäusern[n] und Schlösser[n]” (F 230) schwärmt. Diese sind nicht eindeutig als Nachtträume erkennbar, zumindest werden sie vom Maler als wahrhaftig beschrieben, jedoch geschieht dies in einem von Paradoxa übervollen Monolog. Zudem hat Gößling mit Recht darauf hingewiesen, daß die Mitteilungen des Malers, die nicht vom Protokoll führenden Famulanten überprüft sind[42], “den inhaltlich auf diesem lastenden Wahnverdacht”[43] erhärten.

Träume schaffen im Träumenden eine zweite Wirklichkeit, was in Frost für Nachträume wie für Visionen gleichermaßen gilt, “[i]nnen ist jetzt der andere Schauplatz, und er stimmt mit dem Schauplatz draußen nicht überein”[44]. In wenigen Bernhardschen Werken sind der Traum und der Wahnsinn so präsent wie in Frost und die Tatsache, daß sich Strauch diesen Dingen aussetzt, kann gelesen werden als “Resultat eines Denkens, das an das äußerst Mögliche gehen will […] im Interesse der Präzision”[45], wenn man das Hofmannsthalsche Diktum in Betracht zieht, daß “[a]lle Zweiteilungen […] im Geiste zu überwinden”[46] sind. Strauchs Anspruch ist eben ein solcher Hofmannsthalscher, am Rand des Möglichen, ein Denken bzw. eine Sprache, in der es “keine Irrtümer” gibt und ” der Zufall und das Böse […] ausgeschlossen” sind (F 230). Es ist “alles unerfüllbar” (F 30) und doch muß man Strauchs Bemühungen lesen als ein Versuch, durch möglichst starke Verdichtung und Präzision, “bis in die höchsten Vorstellungen der Verfeinerung hinauf” (F 82), sein Ziel der inneren Einheit zu erreichen.

3.3. Das Alleinsein

Ob Strauch nun aber wirklich ein “synthesesuchender Geist”[47] im Sinne Hofmannsthals ist, ist nicht abschließend zu klären. Der Traum bietet eine alternative Lesart des Wahns und Antriebs der Figur Strauch an. Da der Traum, den Strauch versteht als “den Eintritt in das höhere Staunen” (F 269), bei Bernhard fungiert als “das subversive Potential, die anarchische Dimension”[48], schließt er sich nahtlos an Hofmannsthals Diskussion des geistigen Gewissens der Nation an, das “Spannungen und Beklemmungen hervorruft”[49]. Strauch, obwohl er vielleicht nicht der ersehnte Führer ist, versucht doch, die innere und äußere Einigung zu erzwingen, die Entindividuation, die am Ende der Konservativen Revolution stehen soll. “Die erhoffte Entindividuation soll durch ein Höchstmaß […] an Individuation verwirklicht werden. Von dieser wird erwartet, daß sie auf eine mystische Art und Weise in jene umspringt”[50].

Die Individuation des Malers vollzieht sich in Frost mittels des Alleinseins, des “Eingeschlossenseins in sich selbst” (F 29). Er muß Mitteilungen aus sich lösen, “er reißt die Worte aus sich heraus wie aus einem Sumpfboden” (F 137). Dies ist gleichzeitig, neben einer Denkmethode, ein Selbstschutz[51] gegen die feindliche Umwelt. Eine ähnliche Doppelfunktion findet sich auch in dem titelgebenden Frost. “Der Frost frißt alles auf” (F 247), “[p]lötzlich ist es so kalt, daß einem die Stirnhöhle einfrieren kann” (F 246) und andererseits ist die “Kälte […] der scharfsinnigste Zustand”, der “im Hirn den Verstandesklöppel anschlagen läßt” (F 247). Die Kälte, die auch sinnbildlich für ein versagendes, da bewegungsloses[52] Gesellschaftssystem ist, das wir in der Ordnung von Wolfsegg wiederfinden werden.

Strauch scheitert, er findet keine Antwort, und wenn “der Geist keine Antwort zu finden vermag, übernimmt […] der Körper für den Menschen die Antwort”[53]. Strauch versagt in seinem Vorhaben und sein Körper versagt mit ihm. Nicht, weil durch seinen Einsatz sich die Welt oder doch wenigstens Weng nicht verändert hätte, sondern weil er niemandem ein Führer, das heißt: Lehrer war. Gegen Ende formuliert er es so: “der Eintritt in das höhere Staunen, wissen Sie, und ganz allein” (F 269). Seinen Gesprächspartner, der sich in der Sprache wiederfindet als ‘Sie’, kann er nicht in seine Traumwelt mitnehmen.

3.4. Sprache und Ordnung

Der Famulant schließt seinen Bericht mit den knappen Worten: “[a]m Abend des gleichen Tages beendete ich meine Famulatur und reiste zurück in die Hauptstadt, wo ich mein Studium fortsetzte.” (F 316). Als sei nichts gewesen, fährt der Student in seinem Tagewerk fort. Jedoch hat, still und heimlich, eine enorme Veränderung statt gefunden. Aus den Worten, dem “bloßen Verständigungsmittel”[54] wurde durch des Famulanten Tagebuchaufzeichnungen, die, zusammen mit ein paar Briefen, den Roman Frost konstituieren, echtes Schrifttum. Wenn Kritiker wie Huntemann die Tagebuchform als “Reflex [einer] schreibskeptischen Einsicht”[55] begreifen, so ist ihnen unbedingt zu wiedersprechen, drückt doch die Fixierung in Schrift Vertrauen in eben jene aus. Durch die Schrift kann der Famulant, der sich Strauch “ausgeliefert” (F 304) fühlt, genug Distanz aufbauen, um den Maler als “Wortfetzen und verschobene Satzgefüge” (F 214) begreifen zu können.

“Was fange ich mit seiner Sprache an?” (F 137) fragt sich der Famulant, weit entfernt davon, sich tatsächlich Strauchs “Herzmuskelsprache” (F 137) auszuliefern. Statt dessen bildet er von außen jenes Strauchsche Denken nach, das, wie hier bereits festgestellt, ein nach innen gekehrtes ist, mithilfe der Schrift als Ordnungssystem der Sprache. Sie als solche zu begreifen, bietet sich an in einem Text, in dem nicht die Zerstörung von Natur beklagt wird, sondern eben die Zerstörung von Kultur, von von Menschenhand geschaffener Ordnung[56], die von Strauch wiederholt als Utopie beschrieben wird: “ein Park […] der unendlich sei, […] eine Schönheit, ein kunstvoller Einfall reihe sich in diesem Park an den anderen.” (F 82). Wenn Hofmannsthal in bezug auf die Konservative Revolution verkündet, “[i]hr Ziel ist Form”[57], so kommt das den Strauchschen Vorstellungen schon sehr nahe. Aber anders als bei Hofmannsthal und Borchardt ist in Frost kein Prozeß über den sprachlichen hinaus zu sehen. “Der Maler redet und ich höre zu” (F 225), diese “Urszene der Bernhardschen Gesprächskunst”[58] hat hier noch keine Auswirkung.

Sie hat aber wenigstens erkenntnisfördernde Funktion, denn durch die Sprache, die “der Konstruktion des Denkens, dem Ausdruck als Denksystem”[59]dient, merkt der Student als Hörer dieser Sprache, daß die Sprache, aus dem tiefsten Innern “in die Welt, in die Menschen hinein” (F 137) führt und bestätigt somit das Ausmaß der Strauchschen Innerlichkeit. Die Sprache des Malers ist die komprimierte “Worttransfusion” (F 137), die für den in der Welt stehenden Famulanten zusammenhangslos scheint, aber auf den zweiten Blick “ungeheure Zusammenhänge” (F 137) hat, nur eben im Maler.

Der Sprachschwall, der nur in eine Richtung erfolgt, fordert den Famulanten heraus, der ihm zunächst keine Ordnung zu geben vermag. Erst später ist er imstande Bericht zu erstatten (vgl. F 309f.). Durch diesen ‘Erfolg’ wird in Frost eine Gegenüberstellung von redendem und schreibendem Subjekt konstruiert, mithilfe derer eine weitere Dimension des Strauchschen Versagens offenkundig wird, Strauch vermag eben gerade nicht, aufzuschreiben, Bericht zu erstatten, er muß stets aufhören “nach dem dritten oder vierten Wort” (F 316). Hofmannsthals Diktum, daß nur in der Schrift “[a]lles Höhere, des Merkens würdige”[60] überliefert werde, hinterlässt seine Spuren im Versagen von Strauch. Der lehrende Protagonist der Auslöschung ist hingegen auch ein Schreiber[61].

4. Auslöschung

4.1. Wolfsegg

Franz-Josef Murau, der Erbe von Wolfsegg, verschenkt diesen “gigantische[n] Besitzklumpen” (Aus 37), nach der Beerdigung seiner Eltern. Als Privatlehrer von Gambetti, einem jungen italienischen Mann aus gutsituierter Familie, verdient er gut, ließ sich aber immer finanziell von seinen Eltern unter die Arme greifen. Der Grund für sein Handeln kann also kaum finanzielle Unabhängigkeit sein. Einer der vielen möglichen Gründe liegt in der Konstitution von Wolfsegg. “Murau […] ist gleichzeitig ein Teil und ein Opfer von Wolfsegg. Er ist daher unfähig zu erben”[62]. Wolfsegg, wie Weng in Frost, ist mehr als ein Ort, mehr als Wald, Schloß und Felder. Es ist eine “Kindheitslandschaft” (Aus 599), in der nicht nur die Kindheit Muraus abgebildet ist, sondern vielmehr auch die ‘Kindheit’ des modernen österreichischen Staates[63]. Wolfsegg ist konstruiert aus verschiedenen widerstreitenden Elementen. Erstens die “sogenannte Kindervilla” (Aus 184), in der ein Kindertheater untergebracht ist, ihr Gegenstück ist das Haupthaus von Wolfsegg, der Ort der Erwachsenen, wo sich das Familienleben “mehr oder weniger abspielt” (Aus 183). In Nachbarschaft zur Kindervilla befinden sich die anderen beiden, einander als Gegensätze präsentierten Häuser, das Jägerhaus und das Gärtnerhaus.

“Die Jäger waren niemals meine Freunde gewesen” (Aus 185) schreibt Murau, und nicht zufällig klingt in diesem Satz ein kindlicher Ton nach. Denn nahezu alle Wolfseggerinnerungen Muraus verbindet dieser mit der Kindheit[64] oder der frühen Jugend. Als Erwachsener erfährt Murau daß seine Eltern nach dem zweiten Weltkrieg “ihre nationalsozialistischen Gesinnungsgenossen”, Nationalsozialisten hohen Ranges, in eben der “geliebte[n] Kindervilla” (Aus 184) versteckt hatten. Die Jäger “waren die Faschisten” (Aus 192), sagt Murau später zu seinem Schüler Gambetti, aber es bleibt ungeklärt, wie in weiten Teilen des restlichen Romans, wieviel er tatsächlich erinnert und wieviel sich in seiner Erinnerung sich verändert hat, da eine objektivierende Instanz, wie sie der Famulant in Frost wenigstens ansatzweise darstellte, völlig entfällt.

Auf der anderen Seite stehen die Gärtner, die Murau, damals wie später, lobend unter die “einfachen und ungekünstelten” Menschen zählt. Als Kind ging er gerne und oft zu den Gärtnern, “die ich liebte” (Aus 257), wie Murau schreibt. Die Gärtner sind eng verbunden mit der Natur, mit einem restaurierenden natürlichen Kreislauf, nicht wie die Jäger, die auf alles schießen, das ihnen vor die Flinte kommt und seien es unbescholtene Bürger (vgl. Aus 192). “Die Gärtner in Wolfsegg” hingegen “hatten immer eine heilsame Wirkung ausgeübt” (Aus 334). So ist es im Rahmen der Konstruktion von Auslöschung nicht überraschend, daß Murau darauf besteht, daß wenigstens einer der drei Särge von den Gärtnern getragen werden soll (vgl. Aus 412f.).

Die Gärtner sind “die reinen Menschen” (Aus 334), eine Formulierung, die wirkt, als habe Murau in ihnen das Volk der Romantik wiedergefunden, und tatsächlich redet er, kaum daß er in Wolfsegg ankommt, zuerst mit diesen Gärtnern. Sie sind die “die natürlichsten” (Aus 399), in einer Umgebung, die von Ritualen und “eine[r] unerträgliche[n] Künstlichkeit” (Aus 108) dominiert ist. Während in Frost weite Teile des Romans im Wald stattfinden, bei Spaziergängen durch die steifgefrorene Natur, sind in der Auslöschung, soweit es Wolfsegg betrifft, die Räume entscheidend, die vier Häuser, die eben beschrieben wurden, aber “[d]er Raum zwingt zum Ritual […] Jeder Versuch, gegen diese Ordnung aufzubegehren, wird bestraft”[65]. Murau, als Kind in Wolfsegg, steht unter Dauerbeobachtung in diesen Räumen, alles, was er seinen Eltern sagt, kann als mögliche Lüge aufgefasst werden, besonders schwierig scheinen die mit der Bibliothek zusammenhängenden Belange zu sein. Auch wenn Murau schwört, “zum Lesezweck” (Aus 259) in einer der fünf Bibliotheken gewesen zu sein, wird er der Lüge bezichtigt, man unterstellt ihm, er sei dort seinen “abwegigen Gedanken” (Aus 259) nachgegangen, ohne daß die Natur jener Gedanken je spezifiziert wird.

4.2. Das geheime Denken

Gedanken, Bücher, Ideen sind gefährlich in Wolfsegg, es gibt dort Kästen, in denen “[d]ie Voltaire und Montaigne und Descartes […] ein für allemal versiegelt sein” (Aus 147) sollten, Kästen, die Muraus Onkel Georg, das enfant terrible der Familie, einmal geöffnet hatte und die nach Onkel Georgs Abreise und Umzug nach Cannes, “an dieser Teufelsküste” (Aus 148) wieder fest verschlossen wurden, “sie hatten dabei die Schlüssel nicht nur einmal, sondern gleich zwei- und dreimal umgedreht” (Aus 148f.). Denken scheint gefährlich zu sein, und “[d]as geheimgehaltene Denken ist das entscheidende” (Aus 161).

Dieser letzte Punkt scheint mir ein in der Bernhardforschung unterschätzter zu sein[66], das Denken muß nicht geheimgehalten werden, weil die Gedanken inhaltlich gefährlich sind, oder weil Denken überhaupt eine gefährliche Tätigkeit ist, deren Ausübung man dann natürlich verbergen müßte. Es geht im Gegenteil darum, nicht zu verraten, daß unser Kopf “vollkommen leer” (Aus 160) ist, das kommt ab und zu vor, und dann empfinden wir “einen solchen fürchterlichen Schmerz, daß wir nur fortwährend aufschreien müssten” (Aus 160), was man tunlichst vermeiden sollte, denn das würde “das Ende bedeuten” (Aus 160). Es ist also die Leere, die das geheime Denken darstellt, das Verzweifeln. Das macht auch Sinn im Zusammenhang mit den Attacken der Familie gegen Muraus Bibliotheksaufenthalte, denn nie wird er bestraft für das Lesen indizierter Bücher, man vermutet vielmehr dunkle Beweggründe. Diese könnten durchaus das Nichtdenken sein.

Eine weitere Verbindung ergibt sich hier zu Frost. Nachdem er seine Unfähigkeit erklärt hat, einen kohärenten Text zu Papier zu bringen, beschreibt der Maler Strauch einen “unvorstellbare[n] Schmerz” (F 316), der von seinem Kopf ausgeht. Es ist in der Auslöschung genau die umgekehrte Problemlage. Murau vermag sehr wohl zu schreiben, die auch in der Auslöschung vorhandenen Dialoge dienen zur Erzeugung einer “Mündlichkeitsfiktion, wie sie nur im Medium der Schrift möglich ist”[67]. Durch die an den Anfang und an das Ende gesetzten “schreibt Murau” wird der Schriftcharakter der Murauschen Monologe weiter forciert. Wenn also Murau, der nirgends von derartigen Schmerzen an seinem eigenen Körper berichtet, einen ähnlichen Schmerz beschreibt wie Strauch, könnte man daraus, geht man von einem Werkkontinuum bei Bernhard aus, auf eine weitere Abwertung der Strauchschen Geistesleistung sprechen, denn das leere Blatt und der leere Kopf wiedersprechen sich womöglich nicht unbedingt.

4.3. Auslöschung

Ganz so einfach aber sieht es nicht aus in der Auslöschung. Eva Marquard weist mit Recht darauf hin, daß der Text der Auslöschung gar nicht von Murau geschrieben ist, “sein schriftlich abgefasster Text mit dem Titel ‘Auslöschung’ wird lediglich mitgeteilt”[68], ohne daß es Informationen gibt, wer der Herausgeber, beziehungsweise der Erzähler ist, ob das Manuskript tatsächlich den Titel ‘Auslöschung’ trägt[69] und welchen Umfang es tatsächlich hat, denn diesbezüglich gibt es weder Informationen noch Markierungen irgendeiner Art im Text. Das Projekt der Auslöschung, das Murau wiederholt ankündigt, wird so aus dem Text herausgetragen, auch durch den Trick, daß Murau Gambetti aufträgt, “Amras von Thomas Bernhard” (Aus 7f.) zu lesen, nun ist es aber “keine fiktive Tatsache, sondern eine tatsächliche, daß […] Bernhard diesen Text geschrieben hat, Auslöschung bezieht sich damit explizit auf die textexterne Wirklichkeit”[70]. Das Projekt der Auslöschung bekommt damit auch Gewicht außerhalb der narrativen Struktur von Auslöschung, eine Voraussetzung, damit es als gesellschaftstheoretisches Konzept im Rahmen der Konservativen Revolution angemessen diskutiert werden kann.

Zunächst einmal bezeichnet Muraus Konzept der Auslöschung seine Rebellion gegen den “Herkunftskomplex” (Aus 201), gegen die lebenslängliche Auseinandersetzung mit den immergleichen Themen. Es ist ein autobiographisches Projekt, nur daß er in diesem Bericht, den er Auslöschung zu nennen gedenkt, “alles” auslöscht, seine “ganze Familie wird in ihm ausgelöscht ihre Zeit wird darin ausgelöscht, Wolfsegg wird ausgelöscht in meinem Bericht” (Aus 201).

Es ist hier nicht wörtlich seine Familie gemeint[71], oder ihre ‘Zeit’, es handelt sich mehr um das, was seine Familie repräsentiert, “die infame Provinzhölle” (Aus 295). Die Wolfsegger Ordnung ist starr, dort sitzen die Bildungsphilister[72], die kein Interesse an gesellschaftlicher Bewegung haben. Wenn also Murau behauptet, “Wolfsegg […] auseinanderzunehmen und zu zersetzen” (Aus 296), obwohl er eigentlich Wolfsegg für den Leser überhaupt erst erschafft, dann kann seine “Geistesarbeit” (Aus 613) sich nur gegen diese Ordnung, die “etablierten Strukturen”[73] richten, die nicht eine überkommene ist, sondern nur eine zu starre. Die Wolfsegger sind nicht bereit, “in ihre fürchterlichen Geschichtsabgründe hinein und hinunter” (Aus 17) zu schauen, es mußte erst Onkel Georg kommen, um den jungen Murau “auf den Gegenweg” (Aus 147) zu bringen. Die Tatsache, daß es um eine Besinnung auf die alten, jahrhundertelang missachteten Bücher in den Bibliotheken geht, um eine rückwärtsgewandte Geschichtsbetrachtung, legt nahe, daß es sich beim Projekt der Auslöschung tatsächlich um ein Projekt im Geiste der Konservativen Revolution handelt. Murau blickt nicht in die Zukunft, ohne gleichzeitig in die Vergangenheit zu blicken.

4.4. Restauration und Konservierung

4.4.1. Restauration in Wolfsegg

Murau hat genaue Vorstellungen, was er in Wolfsegg erreichen will, als er dort ankommt. Im wesentlichen handelt es sich hierbei um zwei Dinge. “Es wird mein erstes sein, […] in Wolfsegg den eingesperrten bösen Geist [die eingesperrten Bücher; M.I.] auszulassen, […] und die Bücherkästentüren werde ich […] weit auflassen für immer” (Aus 150), ein Vorgang, bei dem Murau offenbar trachtet, Vergangenes wiederzubeleben, um damit wiederum die Gegenwart zu beleben, “die Geschichte des deutschen[74] Geistes […] wieder erbau[en], bewahr[en]”[75]. Diese Geschichte sucht er “in den alten Büchern, auf den alten Stichen” (Aus 115).

Sylvia Kaufmann hat überzeugend nachgewiesen, daß Muraus Buchpräferenz “reinstates the Romantic antagonism of artist and philistine”[76], so daß auch die verhandelten Bücher selber eine Verbindung zu Borchardts “seherischer Erkenntnis”[77] herstellen. Den Ahnen, denen er nachspürt in den fünf Bibliotheken, fühlt er sich verbundener als den Philistern seiner Gegenwart, “sie hatten ein naturgemäßes Bedürfnis nach Geist und Denken” (Aus 263) lobt er und schwärmt: “Was waren das für Zeiten” (Aus 263). Nach einem ähnlichen Prinzip suchte er sich seinen Wohnort Rom aus: “für den Kopf des Altertums ist Rom die ideale Stadt gewesen, für den heutigen Kopf ist es wieder die ideale” (Aus 207). Seine Ahnenverehrung treibt er sogar soweit, daß er in einem obskuren Portrait den Familienphilosophen zu erkennen glaubt, an “diese[m] charakteristische[n] Descartesbart und [der] hochgezogene[n] Descartesbraue” (Aus 360), dessen Existenz nur gerüchteweise bestätigt ist.

Das zweite Projekt, das er sich in Angriff zu nehmen vornimmt, ist die Restaurierung der Kindervilla, die “vor rund zweihundert Jahren in der Art gebaut worden [ist] in der Art der florentinischen Villen” (Aus 184).. Dieser Bezug nach Italien ist gleichzeitig, im Kontext der antiken Figur Rom, wie oben dargestellt, zu lesen als zeitlicher Rückbezug. Zum einen in die Antike, und zum anderen, auf der expliziten Ebene, um 200 Jahre zurück, zur Zeit der Habsburger, kurz vor dem Verfall des KuK.

4.4.2. Habsburg

Zwar wird die glorreiche österreichische Vergangenheit selten explizit thematisiert in der Auslöschung, dennoch ist der Schatten des “habsburgischen Mythos'”[78] immer zu spüren[79], nicht zuletzt durch den vielsagenden Vornamen des Protagonisten, Franz-Josef, der zwangläufig solche Assoziationen auslöst[80]. “Der Untergang der Monarchie wirkt bis heute traumatisch nach”[81] in der österreichischen Literatur und in Bernhards Werk besonders deutlich. Bei einer näheren Betrachtung ist die Angst vor dem dräuenden Kommunismus in Frost übersetzbar in die Angst vor einer der Monarchie radikal entgegengesetzten Gesellschaftsform.

Dennoch ist sich Murau in der Auslöschung nicht zu schade, eine wiederholte, mehrseitige Katholizismusbeschimpfung zu unternehmen, deren erste Beschimpfungswelle in der Behauptung gipfelt: “[w]ie kein anderes Volk hat sich das unsere von der katholischen Kirche ausnützen lassen” (Aus 146) und deren zweiter den Ausdruck “unser nationalsozialistisch-katholisches Volk” (Aus 444)[82] enthält. Der Katholizismus ist aber in der Auslöschung nicht mit der habsburger Zeit assoziiert, sondern mit der starren faschistoiden Ordnung von Wolfsegg, denn “gegen den Katholizismus,” das “bedeutete […] gegen alles” (Aus 147.).

4.4.3. Literatur und Sprache

Zuletzt bleibt die Frage des Umgangs mit den literarischen Traditionen. In Hofmannsthals Rede wurde der schlechte Umgang mit dem “nationalen Besitz”[83], das heißt, Kulturbesitz beklagt. Man ehre “die wahren großen deutschen Epiker”[84] nicht in ausreichendem Maße. Besonders auffällig sei es im Falle von Goethe, zu dessen Werk es keinen Konsens gebe. Scheinbar reiht sich auch Murau in jene von Hofmannsthal kritisierten ein, die Goethe nicht als Teil der Tradition begreifen oder sogar diese Tradition, und Goethe mit ihr schlicht verwerfen, Goethe, “den Gesteinsnumerierer, den Sterndeuter, den philosophischen Daumenlutscher der Deutschen, der ihre Seelenmarmelade abgefüllt hat in ihre Haushaltsgläser” (Aus 575).

Bei genauerem Hinsehen entpuppt sich jedoch diese Goethebeschimpfung als ein Angriff auf die Goethepietät des Bildungsphilisters im Sinne Hofmannsthals, der die “nicht ganz angenehme[] Goethevertraulichkeit der Philologen und [die] Goethepietät der Einzelnen”[85] kritisierte. Die Attacke Muraus gilt nicht Goethe, dem großen Dichter, sondern Goethe, dem “philosophischen Kleinbürger”, der “den Kopf in den deutschen Schrebergarten gesteckt hat” (Aus 575). Nicht die Tradition wird angegriffen, sondern der falsche, starre, geistig unbewegliche Umgang mit ihr[86]. Murau, der die Gedichte seiner Lieblingsdichterin Maria “immer geliebt hat” (Aus 511), erklärt, diese hätten “den Wert der Goetheschen Gedichte, die [er] am höchsten einschätzt” (Aus 512). Es geht um ein tieferes Verständnis von Literatur, das sich auch in seinem Selbstverständnis als Schriftsteller widerspiegelt[87]: er sieht in sich “nur ein[en] Vermittler von Literatur”, “[e]ine Art literarischer Realitätenvermittler” (Aus 615).

“Das Werk ja, habe ich zu Gambetti gesagt, aber seinen Erzeuger, nein” (Aus 616), schreibt Murau und setzt damit eine wichtige Trennung. Der Text geht ein in die literarisch-kulturelle Tradition, sei der Autor auch noch so gefangen in seiner Gegenwart. Eine ähnliche Trennung in der Betrachtung findet statt, wenn Murau feststellt: “die deutschen Wörter hängen wie Bleigewichte an der deutschen Sprache […] und drücken […] den Geist auf eine diesem Geist schädliche Ebene” (Aus 8). Nation heißt für Borchardt “wie in Urzeiten und allen Zeiten mit seinesgleichen eins”[88] sein. Im Rahmen dieses Konzeptes müssen auch die widersprüchlichen Kommentare Muraus zur deutschen Sprache und Literatur gelesen werden.

Die Trennung von der deutschen Gegenwart, sowie die heftige Romanophilie in der Auslöschung, die übrigens auch ihr Pendant in Hofmannsthals Rede hat, hat in Bernhards Text jedoch eine ganz besondere Dimension, die weder von Hofmannsthal noch von Borchardt vorhergesehen werden konnte, nämlich Auschwitz und die Möglichkeiten und Schwierigkeiten mit dem ‘Deutschen’ und der deutschen Sprache nach Auschwitz, findet sich doch der Nationalsozialismus, wie auch in dieser Arbeit mehrfach angeklungen ist, an prominenter Stelle im Herkunftskomplex der Auslöschung wieder.

4.5. Konservative Revolution

4.5.1. Abschenkung

Wie Borchardt erkennt Murau, daß es “einen weltweiten Verdummungsprozeß” (Aus 646) gibt[89] und erklärt lakonisch, im Angesicht dieses unaufhaltsamen Prozesses gebe es nur die Möglichkeit, sich umzubringen. Dies schlägt zwar einen Bogen zu Muraus Auslöschungsfantasien, aber zeigt sich, im Rahmen der Konstruktion der Auslöschung, als rhetorische Figur. Murau ging, war er “unglücklicher als erträglich”, “[z]u den Gärtnern, […] nicht zu den Jägern” (Aus 191, Hervorhebung Bernhards). Auch in dem gerade beschriebenen Verzweiflungszustand ginge er, führte man diesen Denkvorgang fort, nicht zu den Jägern, die sich “durch ihre Vernichtungswut die Illusion verschaffen, Herren über Leben und Tod zu sein”[90], sondern zu den Gärtnern. Auslöschung bedeutet in der Auslöschung nicht Vernichtung, dafür gibt es kein Indiz. Am Ende des Romans verschenkt Murau Wolfsegg, ein folgerichtiges Ende in der Lesart der vorliegenden Arbeit, der Israelischen Kultusgemeinde in Wien (vgl. Aus 650f.). Es ist insofern folgerichtig, als daß Murau damit die starre Ordnung von Wolfsegg völlig auflöst, indem er sie abtrennt von dem Geschlecht und der Befehlsgewalt der alten Schlossherren, aber nicht zur Erreichung von Chaos oder Anarchie, sondern um Wolfsegg in eine andere Ordnung zu überführen, denn von der Schenkung ist ja nicht eine Privatperson betroffen, sondern eine ganze Gemeinde, die über ihre eigene Struktur und Ordnung verfügt. Ausgelöscht wird also nicht Wolfsegg im wörtlichen Sinne, sondern Wolfsegg im übertragenen Sinne, die Ordnung von Wolfsegg.

4.5.2. Zerstörung

Analog zum Wolfsegger Vorgang vollzöge sich auch -in der Theorie- die Konservativen Revolution in der Welt. “[N]ur eine tatsächlich grundlegende, elementare Revolution […] kann die Rettung sein” (Aus 146) schreibt Murau, eine “Reformation an Haupt und Gliedern”[91] gewissermaßen. Murau, der nicht ähnlichen kleinbürgerlichen Hemmnissen ausgesetzt ist wie Borchardt, hat keine Scheu vor dem Begriff der Revolution, und auch keine Scheu davor, zu erklären, man müsse, ehrlicherweise, “die Welt […] ganz und gar radikal zuerst zerstören, beinahe bis auf nichts vernichten, um sie dann auf die [Murau] erträglich erscheinende Weise wieder herzustellen” (Aus 209). Dies mag, an der Oberfläche, kollidieren mit dem Element der Restauration, bzw. mit dem “‘konservativen’ Aspekt der Konservativen Revolution. Jedoch, wie man bereits an der angekündigten Auslöschung und ihrer tatsächlichen Abwicklung gemerkt hat, geht es Murau nicht um Vernichtung.

Der wichtigste Aspekt scheint mithin das “wieder herzustellen” sein und die Zerstörung hat ihren Gegenpart in Borchardts Postulat einer “politische Katastrophe der Welt”[92]. 1983 kann Murau sich allerdings nicht auf den 2. Weltkrieg als Katastrophe besinnen, restaurative Handlungen zu Muraus Gegenwart fänden “erst nach der Schicksalsstunde und schon in der Stunde verfallenden Rechtes”[93] statt und wären somit, ganz im Sinne Borchardts, sinn- und wirkungslos.

4.5.3. Führung

Sowohl Borchardt als auch Hofmannsthal betonen die Rolle des Führers, beide haben gewisse Einwände in mögliche Führerfiguren, wie Hofmannsthal sie skizziert[94]. Die Notwendigkeit einer solchen Figur jedoch steht für beide außer Frage. Wie in der Betrachtung von Frost festgestellt wurde, scheitert dort die Führerfigur Strauch und die Schülerfigur des Famulanten hat keine Entwicklung hin zu einer solchen Figur durchgemacht. Das Problem könnte in einer zu starren Ordnungsstruktur liegen, einer “geistigen Abhängigkeit”[95] zwischen Lehrer und Schüler. Von einer vergleichbaren Abhängigkeit kann in Auslöschung jedoch nicht die Rede sein. Ganz im Sinne des eins seins mit Sprache und Tradition gibt es hier eine “Identitätskette”, in der die Beteiligten “einander ihr Denken beeinflussen”[96].

Im Fall der Auslöschung ist Gambetti der “kommende[] Philosoph[] und Revolutionär” (Aus 209). Der Ausblick auf die Zukunft ist wichtig, weil, Analog zu Borchardt, sich die Gleichgesinnten erst sammeln müssen, denn “[w]ir sind jetzt eine geschwächte, tatsächlich geistlose österreichische Menschheit […] der das Grundlegende und Elementare gar nicht möglich ist” (Aus 146). Es ist eine Krise des österreichischen Geistes, dieser ist in der stetigen Gefahr der Verdummung.

Murau versucht, als Lehrer Gambettis, bei diesem den Hebel umzulegen, ihn auf den “Gegenweg” (Aus 147) zu bringen. Deshalb füttert er ihn mit Literatur, mit Jean Paul, Broch, Schopenhauer. Während Murau seine Phantasien, etwa die Herrichtung der Kindervilla, nie umsetzt, ist Gambetti “nicht nur der geborene Phantasierer, er ist auch der geborene Ausführer seiner Phantasien” (Aus 544). In Gambetti lebt die Hoffnung auf eine Konservative Revolution, wie sie Muraus skizziert, weiter. Das ist die entscheidende Volte, die Bernhards Werk zwischen Frost und der Auslöschung vollzogen hat. Der Frost ist am Ende des gleichnamigen Romans immer noch da, Strauch ist gestorben und der Famulant hat das Weite gesucht, ohne irgend ein Interesse, die Lage zu ändern. Der Frost in der Auslöschung, in Form der starren Strukturen[97] Wolfseggs, ist durch die Abschenkung beseitigt und die entsprechende Schieflage der Welt, die sich “augenblicklich in einem chaotischen Zustand befindet, während in Wolfsegg die Ordnung herrscht” (Aus 369), soll durch Gambetti bereinigt werden. Es ist eine Utopie, die am Ende der Auslöschung steht, deren Möglichkeit in den Raum gestellt wird, ohne Hinweis auf Gambettis Handlungen nach dem Ableben von Murau und ohne Untersuchung des Ausmaßes der möglichen Selbsttäuschung des Ich-Erzählers Murau.

5. Schluss

“In welches Gespräch mischt sich dieser Monolog?”[98] fragt Ingeborg Bachmann in einem unveröffentlichten Prosatext über das Frühwerk Thomas Bernhards. Die vorliegende Arbeit hat hoffentlich gezeigt, um welches Gespräch es sich, unter vielen anderen, Schopenhauer und Wittgenstein sind sicher die am häufigsten genannten Namen in der Forschungsliteratur, handeln könnte: ein Gespräch mit den Dichtern und Denkern der konservativen Revolution, insbesondere Hofmannsthal und Borchardt.

Mit Recht ist der Prozeß der Auslöschung und Zerstörung, der im Zentrum des komplexen letzten Romans steht, immer wieder auf Auschwitz bezogen worden, am prominentesten im Aufsatz von Irene Heidelberger-Leonard[99] und umgekehrt Frost auf den Solipsismus in der literarischen Tradition, aber die vorliegende Arbeit hat hoffentlich eine weitere Lesart nahe gelegt, die man auch auf das restliche Werk Thomas Bernhards hätte ausdehnen können. Am Beispiel des ersten und letzten Romans jedoch konnte eine Entwicklung untersucht werden, die von Gesellschaftskritik in Frost, der dort noch keine positive Theorie entgegengesetzt werden konnte, hin zu einer voll entwickelten Auseinandersetzung mit der Konservativen Revolution in Auslöschung.

Die enorme Komplexität des Bernhardschen Werks bringt es jedoch mit sich, daß auch diese Lesart sehr selektiv vorging und das Thema eigentlich nach einer genaueren Studie verlangt, die hier aber, im beschränkten Rahmen der vorliegenden Arbeit nicht geleistet werden konnte.

6. Bibliographie

6.1. Ausgaben

Bernhard, Thomas: Frost, Frankfurt a.M. 1972.

Bernhard, Thomas: Auslöschung. Ein Zerfall, Frankfurt a.M. 1988.

Borchardt, Rudolf: Reden, Stuttgart 1955.

Hofmannsthal, Hugo von: Prosa IV, in: ders.: Gesammelte Werke in Einzelausgaben, hrsg. v. Herbert Steiner, Frankfurt a.M. 1988, Bd. 10.

6.2. Forschungsliteratur

Bachmann, Ingeborg: Watten und andere Prosa (über Thomas Bernhard), in: dies.: Kritische Schriften, hrsg. v. Monika Albrecht und Dirk Göttsche, München 2005, 453-458.

Bozzi, Paola: Der Traum als Wiederkehr des Körpers. Zum anderen Diskurs im Werk Thomas Bernhards, in:

Schweizer Monatshefte 9, 2000, 30-34.

Breuer, Stefan: Anatomie der Konservativen Revolution, Darmstadt 1995.

Curtius, Ernst Robert: Europäische Literatur und lateinisches Mittelalter, Bern 1954.

Eickhoff, Hajo: Die Stufen der Disziplinierung. Thomas Bernhards Geistesmensch, in: Thomas Bernhard. Die Zurichtung des Menschen, hrsg. v. Alexander Honold und Markus Joch, Würzburg 1999, 155- 163.

Gößling, Andreas: Thomas Bernhards frühe Prosakunst. Entfaltung und Zerfall seines ästhetischen Verfahrens in den Romanen Frost – Verstörung – Korrektur, Berlin 1987.

Greiner, Ulrich: Der Tod des Nachsommers, München 1979.

Heidelberger-Leonard, Irene: Auschwitz als Pflichtfach für Schriftsteller, in: Anti-Autobiografie. Thomas Bernhards ‘Auslöschung’, hrsg. v. Hans Höller und Irene Heidelberger-Leonard, Frankfurt a.M. 1995, 181-196.

Helms-Derfert, Hermann: Die Last der Geschichte. Interpretationen zur Prosa von Thomas Bernhard, Köln 1997.

Hoffmann, Dieter: Prosa des Absurden. Themen- Strukturen – geistige Grundlagen von Beckett bis Bernhard, Tübingen 2006.

Höller, Hans: Kritik einer literarischen Form. Versuch über Thomas Bernhard, Stuttgart 1979.

ders.: Thomas Bernhards Auslöschung als Comédie humaine der österreichischen Geschichte, in: Thomas Bernhard. Beiträge zur Fiktion der Postmoderne, hrsg. v. Wendelin Schmidt-Dengler, Adrian Stevens und Fred Wagner, Frankfurt a. M. 1997, 47-61.

Huntemann, Willi: Artistik und Rollenspiel. Das System Thomas Bernhard, Würzburg 1990.

Jansen, Georg: Prinzip und Prozeß Auslöschung. Intertextuelle Destruktion und Konstitution des Romans bei Thomas Bernhard, Würzburg 2005.

Jurdzinski, Gerald: Leiden an der “Natur”. Thomas Bernhards metaphysische Weltdeutung im Spiegel der

Philosophie Schopenhauers, Frankfurt a.M: 1984.

Jurgensen, Manfred: Die Sprachpartituren des Thomas Bernhard, in: Bernhard. Annäherungen, hrsg. v. Manfred Jurgensen, Bern 1981, 99-123.

Kappes, Christoph: Schreibgebärden. Zur Poetik und Sprache bei Thomas Bernhard, Peter Handke und Botho Strauß, Würzburg 2006.

Kauffmann, Kai: Rudolf Borchardt und der ‘Untergang der deutschen Nation’. Selbstinszenierung und Geschichtskonstruktion im essayistischen Werk, Tübingen 2003.

Kaufmann, Sylvia: The Importance of Romantic Aesthetics for the Interpretation of Thomas Bernhard’s “Auslöschung. Ein Zerfall” and “Alte Meister. Komödie”, Stuttgart 1998.

Kern, Peter Christoph: Zur Gedankenwelt des späten Hofmannsthal. Die Idee einer schöpferischen Restauration. Heidelberg 1969.

König, Josef: “Nichts als ein Totenmaskenball”. Studien zum Verständnis der ästhetischen Intention im Werk

Thomas Bernhards, Frankfurt a.M. 1983.

Le Rider, Jacques: Hugo von Hofmannsthal. Historismus und Moderne in der Literatur der Jahrhundertwende, Wien 1997.

Madel, Michael: Solipsismus in der Literatur des 20. Jahrhunderts. Untersuchungen zu Thomas Bernhards

Roman Frost, Arno Schmidts Erzählung Aus dem Leben eines Fauns und Elias Canettis Roman Die

Blendung, Frankfurt a.M. 1990.

Marquardt, Eva: Gegenrichtung. Entwicklungstendenzen in der Erzählprosa Thomas Bernhards, Tübingen 1990.

Mittermayer, Manfred: Ich werden. Versuch einer Thomas-Bernhard-Lektüre, Stuttgart 1988.

Prohl, Jürgen: Hugo von Hofmannsthal und Rudolf Borchardt. Studien über eine Dichterfreundschaft, Bremen 1973.

Rudolph, Hermann: Kulturkritik und konservative Revolution. Zum kulturell-politischen Denken Hofmannsthals und seinem problemgeschichtlichen Kontext, Tübingen 1971.

Ryu, Eun-Hee: Auflösung und Auslöschung. Genese von Thomas Bernhards Prosa im Hinblick auf die ‘Studie’, Frankfurt a.M. 1988.

Schmidt-Dengler, Wendelin: Der Übertreibungskünstler. Zu Thomas Bernhard, Wien 1986.

Schneider, Franz: Plötzlichkeit und Kombinatorik. Botho Strauß, Paul Celan, Thomas Bernhard, Brigitte Kronauer, Frankfurt a.M. 1993.

Steuer, Daniel: Thomas Bernhards Auslöschung. Ein Zerfall. Zum Verhältnis zwischen Geschichtsschreibung, Autobiographie und Roman, in: Reisende durch Zeit und Raum. Der deutschsprachige historische Roman, hrsg. v. Osman Durrani und Julian Preeze, Amsterdam 2001.

Süselbeck, Jan: Das Gelächter der Atheisten. Zeitkritik bei Arno Schmidt und Thomas Bernhard, Frankfurt a.M. und Basel 2006.

Vellusig, Robert: Thomas Bernhards Gesprächs-Kunst, in: Thomas Bernhard. Beiträge zur Fiktion der

Postmoderne, hrsg. v. Wendelin Schmidt-Dengler, Adrian Stevens und Fred Wagner, Frankfurt a. M. 1997, 25-46.

Weinzierl, Ulrich: Bernhard als Erzieher. Thomas Bernhards Auslöschung, in: Spätmoderne und Postmoderne. Beiträge zur deutschsprachigen Gegenwartsliteratur, hrsg. v. Paul Michael Lützeler, Frankfurt a.M. 1997, 186-196.

Zimmermann, Peter: Der Bauernroman. Antifeudalismus – Konservativismus-Faschismus, Stuttgart 1975.



[1] König, “Nichts als ein Totenmaskenball”, S. 22.

[2] Abgesehen von einem Vergleich Höllers, der Bernhards Ordnungsbegriff mit dem Paul Landsbergs vergleicht. Vgl. Höller

[3] Weinzierl, Bernhard als Erzieher, S. 192.

[4] Zur Rolle des Holocausts bei Bernhard vgl. Süselbeck, Das Gelächter der Atheisten, bes. S. 448-531.

[5] Unklar ist, ob sie überhaupt als mehr oder weniger einhaltliche Bewegung zu bezeichnen ist. Vgl. Breuer, Anatomie der konservativen Revolution. Breuer unterschlägt allerdings sowohl Hofmannsthal als auch Borchardt in seiner Betrachtung, was im Rahmen der vorliegenden Arbeit umgekehrt einen Verzicht auf die konservativen Revolutionäre des neuen Nationalismus’ erleichtert.

[6] Rudolph, Kulturkritik und Konservative Revolution, S. 263f.

[7] Vgl. Rudolph, S. 266.

[8] Prohl, Hugo von Hofmannsthal und Rudolf Borchardt, S. 238.

[9] Borchardt, Reden, S. 230-253.

[10] Vgl. Prohl, ebda.

[11] Hofmannsthal, Prosa IV, S. 413.

[12] Kern, Zur Gedankenwelt des späten Hofmannsthal, S. 93.

[13] Hier ist der vielleicht deutlichste Bruch mit der von Breuer und anderen skizzierten nationalistischen Konservativen Revolution: “Nun ist aber ein Erkennungszeichen der ‘konservativen Revolution’ gerade die erbitterte Kritik an der französischen ‘Zivilisation’, die sie der tugendhaften deutschen ‘Kultur’ gegenüberstellt.” Le Rider, Hugo von Hofmannsthal, S. 273.

[14] Hofmannsthal, S. 391.

[15] ebda.

[16] Hofmannsthal, S. 390.

[17] ebda.

[18] ebda.

[19] Hofmannsthal, S. 399.

[20] Hofmannsthal, S. 400.

[21] Hofmannsthal, S. 411.

[22] Kern, S. 93.

[23] Vgl. Kauffmann, Rudolf Borchardt und der ‘Untergang der deutschen Nation’, S. 166-192.

[24] Borchardt, S. 230.

[25] Borchardt, S. 232.

[26] Angezeigt durch z.B. “ganz wie, mutatis mutandis, bei uns”, Borchardt, S. 234.

[27] Borchardt, S. 235.

[28] Hier ist übrigens anzumerken, daß eine Linie von dieser Rede zur Rede über “Führung” führt, deren Nähe zum Nationalsozialismus in der Aufnahme nach dem zweiten Weltkrieg, nach Auschwitz, die Rezeption dieses Elements der Rede stark einschränkt. Vgl. Kap. 4.4.3.

[29] Borchardt, S. 236.

[30] Borchardt, S. 237.

[31] Borchardt, S. 239.

[32] Borchardt, S. 241.

[33] Borchardt, S. 242.

[34] Borchardt, S. 252.

[35] vgl.: “Die Hinwendung zur Stadt ist die Hinwendung zu Ordnung und Künstlichkeit und zu den sublimen Tätigkeiten des Menschen wie Musizieren, Malen und Schreiben. Das Stadtleben ist ein Leben gegen die Natur und ein Leben für den Geist.” in: Eickhoff, Die Stufen der Disziplinierung, S. 158.

[36] Mittels der Siglen F für Frost und Aus für Auslöschung, sowie nachfolgender Seitenangabe werden Zitate der zu interpretierenden Romane im fortlaufenden Text nachgewiesen.

[37] Ryu, Auflösung und Auslöschung, S. 41.

[38] Jurdzinski, Leiden an der Natur, S. 99. Vgl. F 75.

[39] Borchardt, S. 247.

[40] Der “nationalsozialistisch-katholische” (Aus 292) Österreicher hat in Frost noch nicht die Bühne betreten.

[41] Höller, Kritik einer literarischen Form, S. 12.

[42] Dass etwa die Trauer um die Bauern nur zu Strauchs Vision gehört und im Text nicht als ‘objektiv’ wahr konstruiert wird, zeigt sich am Ekel des Famulanten vor den Dorfbewohnern (vgl. F 85). Sie ist allerdings nicht Teil eines Strauchschen Nachttraums, vielmehr treffen sich in der Welt des Wahns in Frost der Traum in der wörtlichen und übertragenen Bedeutung.

[43] Gößling, Thomas Bernhards frühe Prosakunst, S. 101.

[44] Bozzi, Der Traum als Wiederkehr des Körpers, S. 31.

[45] Schneider, Plötzlichkeit und Kombinatorik, S. 132.

[46] Hofmannsthal, S. 411.

[47] Hofmannsthal, S. 412.

[48] Bozzi, S. 31.

[49] Hofmannsthal, S. 399.

[50] Madel, Solipsismus in der Literatur des 20. Jahrhunderts, S. 57, vgl. auch S. 34.

[51] Vgl. Mittermayer, Ich werden, S. 40.

[52] Dazu passt auch die Episode mit dem totgefrorenen Schwein, das Strauch antreiben will, in das er aber statt dessen mit seinem Stock hineinsticht (Vgl. F 247).

[53] König, S. 195.

[54] Hofmannsthal, S. 390.

[55] Huntemann, Artistik und Rollenspiel, S. 69.

[56] Vgl. Gößling, S. 91.

[57] Hofmannsthal, S. 413.

[58] Vellusig, Thomas Bernhards Gesprächs-Kunst, S. 37.

[59] Jurgensen, Die Sprachpartituren des Thomas Bernhard, S. 110.

[60] Hofmannsthal, S. 390.

[61] Am Anfang und am Ende der Auslöschung steht “schreibt Murau”, ein deutlicher Verweis auf den Unterschied zu fast dem kompletten restlichen Werk, wo im Allgemeinen der Hörer schreibt und berichtet.

[62] Steuer, Thomas Bernhards Auslöschung. Ein Zerfall., S. 67.

[63] Vgl. Höller, Thomas Bernhards Auslöschung als Comédie humaine der österreichischen Geschichte, S. 48ff.

[64] Beachtenswert ist in diesem Zusammenhang die Beziehung, die Helms-Derfert zwischen der Kindheitsverklärung in der Auslöschung und romantischen Märchen zieht, vgl. Helms-Derfert, Die Last der Geschichte, S. 218ff. und der dort später angeführten Verbindung der Jäger zur modernen Entzauberung der Welt, die ja mit dem Kindheits- und Märchenmotiv interagiert, welches leider nicht Eingang finden kann in die vorliegende Untersuchung, vgl. Helms-Derfert, S. 225.

[65] Schmidt-Dengler, Der Übertreibungskünstler, S. 121.

[66] Kappes beschäftigt sich zwar mit dieser Phrase, zieht aber die falschen Schlüsse aus der Passage. Vgl. Kappes, Schreibgebärden, S. 60.

[67] Vellusig, S. 28.

[68] Marquard, Gegenrichtung, S. 58.

[69] Darauf deutet der Satz “[…] und wo ich diese Auslöschung geschrieben habe, […] schreibt Murau” (Aus 151) hin, nicht zuletzt aufgrund der kursiven Schreibweise des Wortes ‘Auslöschung’, das an die literaturwissenschaftliche Zitierweise von Monographien erinnert. Allerdings gibt es so viele kursive Worte in Bernhardschen Texten, auch in der Auslöschung, daß dies ein eher schwaches Indiz ist. Vgl. Jansen, Prinzip und Prozess Auslöschung, S. 110f.

[70] Steuer, S. 69.

[71] Es ist eine bittere Entdeckung, die Murau machen muß, daß seine Familie tatsächlich “ausgelöscht” wurde, wie es eine lokale Zeitung später verkündet (vgl. Aus 404).

[72] Vgl. Aus 76

[73] Hoffmann, Prosa des Absurden, S. 395.

[74] Zur Frage des deutschen, siehe 4.4.2.

[75] Borchardt, S. 249.

[76] Kaufmann, The Importance of Romantic Aesthetics for the Interpretation of Thomas Bernhard’s “Auslöschung. Ein Zerfall” and “Alte Meister. Komödie”, S. 72.

[77] Borchardt, S. 236.

[78] Greiner, Der Tod des Nachsommers, S. 53.

[79] Vgl.: “Hofmannsthal empfand sich als Erben der habsburgischen Tradition” (Curtius, Europäische Literatur und lateinisches Mittelalter, S. 153.)

[80] Vgl. Höller, S. 54.

[81] Greiner, S. 15.

[82] Es scheint dies übrigens auch eine von der Geschichtswissenschaft in letzter Zeit gemachte Verbindung zu sein, so daß sich Bernhard auch in dieser Hinsicht als scharfsichtig erwiesen hat. Vgl. Süselbeck 451f.

[83] Hofmannsthal, S. 396

[84] ebda.

[85] ebda.

[86] Vgl. Süselbeck, S. 299.

[87] Zur Verbindung der Auslöschung mit der Schriftstellerdiskussion, vgl. Ryu, S. 100.

[88] Borchardt, S. 249.

[89] Vgl. Borchardt, S. 242f.

[90] Hoffmann, S. 396.

[91] Borchardt, S. 252.

[92] Borchardt, S. 237.

[93] Borchardt, S. 239.

[94] Vgl. Prohl, S. 235.

[95] Ryu, S. 111.

[96] ebda.

[97] Achtung, es handelt sich nicht um ‘progressive’ Kritik, es ist nicht die Rede von überkommenen Strukturen, vgl. Aus 489.

[98] Bachmann, Watten und andere Prosa, S. 455.

[99] Vgl. Heidelberger-Leonard, Auschwitz als Pflichtfach für Schriftsteller.

Zitat des Tages (1)

Natürlich läßt sich nicht alles auf die Dummheit schieben, wovon ein so vollmenschliches Anliegen, wie es die Kunst ist, verunstaltet wird; es muß, wie besonders die Erfahrungen der letzten Jahre gelehrt haben, auch für die verschiedenen Arten der Charakterlosigkeit Platz bleiben.

Robert Musil (Aus dem Vortrag “Über die Dummheit”.)

Die Kulturindustrie als Retter der Kunst

In der „Kulturindustrie“ von Adorno und Horkheimer wird dargestellt, wie durch die Industrialisierung der Kultur die Herrschaft der Konzerne jeden Bereich kultureller Bildung und Ausbildung erfasst. Dies geschieht durch eine Art Rationalisierung, die zum einen die „irrationale Gesellschaft“ (146) zur Ursache hat, die durch die rationalen Klassifikationen und Schematismen erst kontrollierbar wird, und zum anderen die „Rationalität der Herrschaft selbst“ (142), durch die der Schematismus als Methode zur Kontrolle der Gesellschaft erst plausibel wird. Es scheint, als ob die Kulturindustrie an einem Verfall der Kultur und der Kunst beteiligt sei und als ob der „Kulturindustrie“ -Text diesen Verfall darstellt. Ich meine jedoch in diesem Text auch ein Moment der Hoffnung zu finden, der durch die Kultur-Industrie herbeigeführten Rettung. Kann das überhaupt sein? Kann die Kulturindustrie die Kunst retten?

Die Kulturindustrie scheint nach Adorno und Horkheimer ein im Vergleich zur traditionellen Kultur erhöhtes Maß an Stilbewusstsein zu besitzen, das sich äußert in Form einer stereotypen Übertragung der vorkommenden, aufkommenden, ja, der „noch gar nicht gedachten“ (148) Kulturbestandteile und Ideen in ein Schema, das der mechanisierten Darreichungsform von Kultur gerecht wird und den Schematismen, denen die Konsumenten, also das Publikum, ausgesetzt sind. Diese Anpassung ist, anders als man erwarten könnte, nicht unbedingt eine Vereinfachung, sondern tatsächlich eine Anpassung an einen Stil, eine Anpassung, deren Ausführung unwillkürlich erfolgt, was zeigt, wie tief das Bewusstsein des Stils schon eingegangen ist in die Köpfe der Kulturschaffenden.

Dieser Stil, das Idiom der Kulturindustrie, wird durchgesetzt durch eine scharfe Selbstzensur, die in den wenigsten Fällen bewusst ist, in allen Fällen aber das Konzept einer technisch und mechanisch produzierten und dargebotenen Kultur voraussetzt und der durch sich, durch seine idiomatische Perfektion den Versuch unternimmt, eine Natur herzustellen, die nah genug an der gesellschaftlichen Wahrheit ist, um vom Publikum widerstandslos akzeptiert zu werden und sich andererseits klar genug auf Distanz halten muss, um dem Konsumenten die dahinter stehenden Machtmechanismen zu verbergen und zu verhindern, dass diesem seine ihm von der Kulturindustrie angefertigte Klassifikationen bewusst werden.

Dieser Stil wird nicht von einer äußerlichen Gewalt einem System aufgezwungen, sondern er geht aus von einem Idiom, das durch die Allgegenwart des Einflusses des Kapitals, das des gesellschaftlichen Systems ist. Der Stil ist der Gesellschaft, auf die er trifft, natürlich. Der Stil muss sich von nichts absetzen, nicht gegen etwas arbeiten, er wird ohne Gegenwehr angenommen als eigener.

Die beiden Autoren widersprechen der landläufigen Auffassung, dass im Abendland, wohl durch eben die erwähnte Industrialisierung und Mechanisierung, die „stilbildende Kraft“ im Erlöschen begriffen sei (148), ebenso bestreiten sie die Relevanz einer Konzeption von „Stil“ als Aspekt der „guten alten Zeit“ vor der Mechanisierung als auch die positiven Konnotationen des Stils, den dieser in Zusammenhang mit diesen irrigen Auffassungen annehme. Stil habe schon immer „die je verschiedene Struktur der sozialen Gewalt“ (151) ausgedrückt, also eher die Struktur der Herrschaft als eine wie auch immer geartete Erfahrungswelt der Beherrschten wiedergegeben. Große Kunst sei stets daran erkennbar gewesen, dass sie den Stil nicht verkörperte, sondern ihn beherrschte, ihn verwendete und mit ihm brach, wenn es ihr notwendig war, denn großer Kunst sei es primär darum gegangen, eigene Erfahrung und eigenes Leiden deutlich und lesbar zu machen und Kunst als Vermittlung zu verwenden.

Große Kunst ist also persönlich. Der Stil aber stellt in jedem Kunstwerk die Verbindung her zum Allgemeinen, zur sozialen Struktur, zur Wahrheit, die bei Adorno/Horkheimer immer gesellschaftliche Wahrheit ist. Stil hat damit stets auch ideologische Funktion. Im Stil ist der Versuch des Kunstwerks verortet, eine Einheit von Individuum und Gesellschaft herzustellen.

Der Stil der Kulturindustrie muss eine solche Einheit nicht erst versuchen, denn der Unterschied hat längst eine Nivellierung von Seiten des gesellschaftlichen Idioms erfahren, diesen Unterschied, so verkündet es laut, gibt es nicht. Die Kulturindustrie ist „nur noch Stil“ (152), nur noch gesellschaftliche Wahrheit und damit entlarvt sie den Stil als gehorsam „gegen die gesellschaftliche Hierarchie“ (152). In der Kulturindustrie wird der Stil, der durch keine Abweichungen und Veränderungen und Brüche mehr seine Natur verbergen kann, zum Instrument der gesellschaftlichen Analyse und öffnet auch einen neuen Blick auf das Verhältnis von Kunst zur Gesellschaft und zur Herrschaft und zeigt, dass in ihr durch den Stil immer eine Verbindung innewohnte, das Individuum mit der Herrschaft zu versöhnen.
Den gleichen Effekt, das Entlarven einer altbekannten Erscheinung durch die von der technischen Reproduzierbarkeit angetriebenen Veränderungen dieser Erscheinung, also im Fall des Stils durch die Entwicklung eines „totalen Stils“, zeichnen die Autoren ein weiteres Mal nach, diesmal anhand der Katharsis.

Der Begriff der Katharsis beschreibt bekanntlich eine seelische Läuterung und Reinigung von den Affekten durch ein intensives Ausleben eben dieser Affekte und ist, besonders auch in Diskussionen der Tragödie, durchaus positiv, wenigstens aber neutral besetzt. Das durch die Kulturindustrie enthüllte Wesen der Katharsis besteht darin, dass sie den „äußeren Herren“ (166) Gewalt einräumt über die Innerlichkeit der Beherrschten.

Das Ausleben von Affekten, von „wilden“ Gefühlen und Wünschen, von Trauer, Liebe und Zorn „reinigt“ die Individuen so, dass sie anschließend einem geregelten Leben nachgehen können, in dessen ordnungsgemäßem Verlauf sie abweichende, extreme, unerwünschte oder einfach nur aufwühlende Gefühle gut genug unter Kontrolle haben, um funktionieren zu können. Von wem nämlich ist dieses „geregelte Leben“ geregelt, wenn nicht von einer sozialen Struktur, die immer eine Struktur der Herrschaft war. Dieses „Funktionieren“ ist also ein Funktionieren im sozialen Glied, in einer Hierarchie, an deren Hebeln die „äußeren Herren“ sitzen. Als Herrschende müssen sie sich nicht mit den anarchischen und regelgefährdenden Kräften unkontrollierter Gefühle auseinandersetzen, wenn die beherrschten mittels der Katharsis als Ventil für unpraktische Gefühle, sich selbst schon kontrollieren und diese Kontrolle als wünschenswert postulieren.

So dargestellt, scheint die Evidenz der Funktion der Katharsis überwältigend, dennoch ist dieses Wesen der Katharsis erst offenbar geworden unter dem Eindruck der Kulturindustrie, welche die Innerlichkeit „zur offenen Lüge“ (166) herrichtete, indem sie hohe Güter und Ideale durch stereotype Behandlung, durch Übersetzung in das Idiom der Kulturindustrie den Massen zuwider machte. An ihre Stelle trat das Amusement, in dessen Diensten, also in Diensten der Filmhandlung, der Stars, der Unterhaltung, des Spaßes, des Witzes alles: Liebe, Lust und Wut gestellt wird.

Das Amusement ist nicht der Spaß oder die Unterhaltung des individuellen Konsumenten sondern sie ist das verbindende Element dieses Prozesses, gleichsam der Wiedergänger jener Katharsis, ein Gefühlskompositum, das es dem Konsumenten erlaubt, für den Zeitraum des akuten Konsums gefühlsmäßig „die Sau rauszulassen“, mitzulieben in einer Schnulze, mitzuhassen in einem Boxkampf, mit dem Actionheld zu fluchen und dem Bösewicht zu zürnen, mit einem Wort: sich zu reinigen, um nach dem Konsum wieder ins Glied treten zu können, als Bürger, Konsument und Beherrschter.

Der Beherrschte ist, scheinbar, auch immer der Umworbene, selbst wenn die werbenden Parteien wenig trennen mag. Das Mittel dieser Umwerbung ist die Reklame, die jedes Produkt umgibt und somit Teil des Idioms der Kulturindustrie geworden ist, und so wie das Idiom Hinweise auf die „Verfahren der Menschenbehandlung“ (187) durch das in ihr durchscheinende Individuum gibt, so unterstützt die dem Idiom entspringende Sprache, die völlig im Sprechen aufgeht, die Beeinflussung des Konsumenten durch Reklame oder Propaganda.

Ursprünglich, sagen Horkheimer und Adorno, waren Wort und Bedeutung eng verknüpft miteinander, ein Wort bedeutete wirklich etwas, es war mehr als nur eine Bezeichnung, das Bezeichnete war ihm innerlich und wesentlich, gleichsam eingeschrieben. So konnte die Verwendung von emotional aufgeladenen Worten wie denen der Wortgruppe der Vaterlandsliebe in propagandistischen Zusammenhängen schwer aufgedeckt werden als manipulativ, denn die Worte schienen wirklich „Vaterland“, „Heimat“, „Zuhause“ zu bedeuten. Sie trugen diese Bedeutungen in sich.

Nun aber, da die Verbindung erkannt ist als eine willkürliche, gerinnen gemeinhin als bedeutungsvoll anerkannte Ausdrücke zur Formel, deren Bedeutung sich, wenn überhaupt, aus ihrer Verwendung ergibt. Das Wort „Vaterland“ ist ein hervorragendes Beispiel für ein Wort, dessen Bedeutung nicht aus dem Wort selbst, sondern nur aus dem Kontext gewonnen werden kann. Das Wort bezeichnet zwar eine Sache, diese macht aber keineswegs ihre Bedeutung aus, so sind etwa mehrere propagandistische Bedeutungen denkbar.

Die Worte werden blind und stumm was ihre Bedeutungen betrifft, sie sagen nichts mehr darüber aus, sie lassen, für sich genommen, keine anderen Befunde zu als über den einen Gegenstand den sie bezeichnen, statt dessen wirken sie nun in Form von Praktiken, wodurch die Verbreitung von Ideologien, Propaganda und natürlich auch Reklame vereinfacht wird, da die Worte nichts mehr von dem zu bedeuten scheinen, was sie mit der Welt der Erfahrungen verbunden hatte. Sie werden kälter und nehmen überall in ihrer Verwendung Reklamecharakter an. Und durch die Rückwirkung von Entwicklungen im gesellschaftlichen System auf das Idiom, die wir zu Beginn ausgemacht hatten, wird somit aus aller Reklame- und Propagandasprache umgekehrt Alltagssprache.

Nun freilich ließe sich behaupten, dass all die aufgeführten Veränderungen eher ein Zeichen von kulturellem Verfall denn einer guten Entwicklung seien, welcher Art auch immer. Man übersähe jedoch die Wendung, die alle drei Veränderungen ermöglichen in Bezug auf die Erkenntnis von Einflüssen auf die Beherrschten und auf die Aufrechterhaltung von herrschaftlichen Strukturen mittels der Sprache. In allen drei Fällen enthüllte die extreme Entwicklung von sprachlichen Mustern die Machtstrukturen und die Manipulationsmöglichkeiten, die immer schon in der Sprache gelegen hatten, die jedoch immer übersehen worden waren. Erst die von der Kulturindustrie herbeigeführten Änderungen, deren entscheidende darin bestand, dass die verhüllenden Trennungen von Individuum und Allgemeinheit durch die Allgegenwart der Konzerne aufgehoben wurden und Strukturen, die zuvor nur im Kleinen sichtbar waren, in ihrer Wirkung im Großen offenbar wurden.

In diesen Erkenntnissen sehe ich einen entscheidenden Fortschritt, die Hoffnung einer Kunsttheorie, einer Ästhetikkonzeption, in der die Einflüsse klar liegen, in der die Kunst und die Macht offen getrennt liegen, die nicht mehr Herrschaft perpetuiert. Die Möglichkeit ist eröffnet, eine Kunsttheorie zu entwickeln, die „Kunst“ von „sozialer Struktur“ trennt, die das Moment reiner Kunst darzustellen vermag, ein Moment, dessen Notwendigkeit bislang verborgen blieb, das nun aber zu Tage tritt.

Ja, die Kulturindustrie, so könnte man die Eingangsfrage aufnehmen und beantworten, rettet die Kunst, sie rettet die blinde Kunst vor sich selbst, indem sie mit der Vergrößerungslinse des totalen Stils, des kulturellen Idioms, alle ihre Schwächen aufdeckt und so den Weg freimacht für eine Erneuerung.